Yugoslavia / Europe & Central Asia

Journalists attacked in Yugoslavia since 1992

  

Attacks on the Press 2006: Europe Snapshots

Attacks & Developments Throughout the Region

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Attacks on the Press 2006: Europe and Central Asia Snapshots

Armenia Germany/Poland Poland Bosnia Italy Portugal Bulgaria Lithuania Romania Croatia Macedonia Serbia Cyprus Moldova Switzerland Denmark Netherlands ARMENIA • On May 25, authorities denied independent television station A1+ a broadcasting license for the 12th time. According to press reports, the National Commission on Television and Radio justified the rejection by saying that competitors submitted stronger…

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CPJ Update

CPJ Update July 14, 2006 News from the Committee to Protect Journalists Return to front page | See previous Updates

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Attacks on the Press in 2004: Preface by Tom Brokaw

Remember 1989? The collapse of the Soviet Union and the rise of democracy and democratic institutions in the old Communist bloc, including Mother Russia, inspired a new generation of journalists in places where a free press had been a state crime. Other journalists in other places, such as Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and…

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Attacks on the Press 2004: Europe and Central Asia Analysis

Overview by Alex Lupis Authoriatarian rulers strengthened their hold on power in many former Soviet republics in 2004. Their secretive, centralized governments aggressively suppressed all forms of independent activity, from journalism and human rights monitoring to religious activism and political opposition.

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Journalists Killed in the Last Ten Years

The Toll: 1995-2004 Each year in January, the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) publishes a list of journalists killed in the line of duty around the world. This list has become the most widely cited press freedom statistic and is often seen as a barometer of the state of global press freedom. While the correlation…

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Murder by MediaWhy the Rwandan genocide tribunal went too far.

Murder by MediaWhy the Rwandan genocide tribunal went too far. By Joel Simon Slate

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The Press and the War on Terrorism: New Dangers and New Restrictions

Edited transcript of remarks, 5/5/04 Carnegie Council Conversation (Merrill House, New York City).

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Attacks on the Press 2002: The Hague

December 11 Jonathan C. Randal, The Washington Post The U.N. International War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague (ICTY) ruled to limit compelled testimony from war correspondents. The decision, announced at the tribunal’s Appeals Chamber, came in response to the appeal by former Washington Post reporter Jonathan C. Randal, who had been…

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Attacks on the Press 2002: Kyrgystan

Emboldened by the growing number of U.S. troops in the country, President Askar Akayev has used the threat of international terrorism as an excuse to curb political dissent and suppress the independent and opposition media in Kyrgyzstan. Compliant courts often issue exorbitant damage awards in politically motivated libel suits, driving even the country’s most prominent…

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