Taiwan / Asia

Journalists attacked in Taiwan since 1992

  
People walk on a street in Taipei, Taiwan, on March 30, 2020. CPJ recently spoke with journalist Brian Hioe on covering COVID-19 in Taiwan. (AP/Chiang Ying-ying)

Reporter Brian Hioe on dealing with misinformation in Taiwan amid pandemic

Brian Hioe is an editor for the New Bloom Magazine, a news website that covers social issues, politics, and culture in the Asia Pacific region. He also works as a freelance journalist in Taiwan, where the government has been praised for its responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Journalists and press freedom supporters stage a silent march to police headquarters to denounce treatment of the media during protests over a proposed extradition bill, in Hong Kong, on July 14, 2019. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

One Country, One Censor: How China undermines media freedom in Hong Kong and Taiwan

Understanding how China tries to influence the media is a first step to preserve press freedom. Hong Kong and Taiwan are on the frontlines of this battle. In deeply polarized Hong Kong, journalists are under pressure as independent outlets struggle to counteract strong pro-Beijing influence. And Taiwan must navigate how to maintain its openness and…

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Journalists and press freedom supporters stage a silent march to police headquarters to denounce treatment of the media during protests over a proposed extradition bill, in Hong Kong, on July 14, 2019. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

One Country, One Censor: Recommendations

CPJ offers the following recommendations regarding press freedom in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

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Journalists and press freedom supporters stage a silent march to police headquarters to denounce treatment of the media during protests over a proposed extradition bill, in Hong Kong, on July 14, 2019. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

One Country, One Censor: About This Report

Understanding how China tries to influence the media is a first step to preserve press freedom. Hong Kong and Taiwan are on the frontlines of this battle. In deeply polarized Hong Kong, journalists are under pressure as independent outlets struggle to counteract strong pro-Beijing influence. And Taiwan must navigate how to maintain its openness and…

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Taiwan's digital minister, Audrey Tang, in an interview with CPJ, compares disinformation to a virus and proactive counter-messaging to a vaccine. (CPJ/Steven Butler)

Q&A: Taiwan’s digital minister on combatting disinformation without censorship

Audrey Tang prefers precise language. During an interview, Taiwan’s minister without portfolio – Tang’s name card simply says “digital minister” – makes a swift correction when we mention the term “fake news.” The preferred term is “disinformation” because, Tang says, it has a legal definition in Taiwan: “That is to say, intentional, harmful untruth, and…

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Democratic Progressive Party lawmaker Lo Chih Cheng poses with copies of Hong Kong's Ta Kung Pao and Wen Wei Po newspapers after a news conference, in Taipei, Taiwan, on January 18, 2019. (Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

Taiwan accuses Beijing-sponsored Hong Kong newspapers of disseminating misinformation, opens immigration investigation into journalists

On January 17, 2019, Taiwan’s presidential office issued a statement on Facebook accusing Ta Kung Pao, a Hong Kong newspaper funded by Beijing, of fabricating a story alleging that Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen secretly sent an envoy to advise three Hong Kong independence activists. The Taiwan government is currently investigating whether the journalists violated immigration…

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Guards attend a flag-raising ceremony at Taipei's Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall in March 2018. Taiwan's parliament is considering a draft bill to penalize 'fake news.' (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

Taiwanese lawmakers propose criminalizing spread of fake news

Taipei, June 13, 2018–The Committee to Protect Journalists today called on Taiwan’s parliament, known as the Legislative Yuan, to reject a proposed amendment that would make spreading fake news punishable by imprisonment or a fine.

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Taiwanese journalists barred from UN aviation agency assembly

New York, September 26, 2016 – The International Civil Aviation Organization should allow journalists to cover its events regardless of where they are from or where their employers are located, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The UN agency, which is responsible for setting global safety standards, yesterday refused to accredit two journalists for…

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Tsai Ing-wen, center, declares victory in the presidential election in Taipei on January 16, 2016. (AP/Wally Santana)

We’re live from Taipei! Please don’t tell China’s censors

Typically, news organizations like to promote original reporting. When an outlet covers a breaking news event at the time and from the place where the event is happening, they want their audience to know. However, for Chinese commercial media that covered this weekend’s presidential election in Taiwan, this was apparently not the case.

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In Taiwan, three journalists arrested at student protest

Three journalists were arrested in Taiwan’s capital, Taipei, on July 23, 2015 while covering a student protest, according to reports. Liao Chen-hui, a photographer for Liberty Times, Sung Hsiao-hai, a reporter for Coolloud Collective, and freelance reporter Lin Yu-yu were released without charge the following day, according to reports.

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