In India, corruption can be deadly beat

Journalists covering corruption in India are vulnerable to attack, with those from small towns and rural areas at greater risk. The cases of Jagendra Singh, Umesh Rajput, and Akshay Singh, who were all reporting on allegations of wrongdoing at the time of their deaths, highlight the dangers faced by the press and the reluctance by regional authorities to independently investigate the murders of journalists. A special report by CPJ.

• Introduction: English | हिंदी में
• Recommendations: English | सिफारिशें
Video: The case of Jagendra Singh
Graphic: Journalists killed in India

Blog   |   India

In India, online campaign seeks to free press from risk of criminal defamation

India's Parliament in New Delhi. A private members' bill to decriminalize defamation will be heard during its winter session. (AFP/Money Sharma)

An online campaign to decriminalize defamation in India is being led by a member of the country's main opposition party. "Criminal defamation can lead to people being put in jail for something they have said publicly. This law needs to be replaced by a modern, progressive law," reads the statement on the campaign website.

Alerts   |   India

Kashmir newspaper ordered to suspend printing

A protester jumps over burning debris in Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, September 12, 2016. (Reuters/Danish Ismail)

New York, October 3, 2016 - Authorities in Jammu and Kashmir should immediately reverse an order to suspend publication of the Kashmir Reader newspaper, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Police arrived at the daily newspaper's office with an order to stop publishing yesterday.

October 3, 2016 12:56 PM ET


Case   |   India

TV journalists beaten, threatened covering protest

Men in Bangalore, India, take a selfie in front of a truck protesters had set ablaze, September 12, 2016. (AP/Raijaz Rahi)

Protesters in Bangalore, the capital of India's Karnataka state, on September 12, 2016, assaulted Rohini Swamy, deputy editor of the English-language news channel India Today TV, and Madhu Y, a cameraman for the channel, as the two covered demonstrations against a Supreme Court order to divert some water from the Cauvery River to the neighboring state of Tamil Nadu.

Impact   |   Egypt, India, Iraq, Peru, Saudi Arabia

CPJ Newsletter: We fight back against defamation, highlight impunity in India, and host an exhibit on Shawkan's works

September edition

IOC creates mechanism for journalist complaints after CPJ consultation

In early August, we welcomed the creation of a press freedom complaints mechanism by the International Olympic Committee. The move followed years of advocacy with the IOC by CPJ and other rights groups to do more to hold governments that host the Olympic Games accountable for press freedom abuses.

September 1, 2016 2:00 PM ET

Alerts   |   India

Journalists attacked by protesters as curfew lifts in Kashmir

New Delhi, August 31, 2016--Authorities in Jammu and Kashmir must take stronger measures to ensure the safety of journalists, and should investigate two separate attacks against staff at the Kashmir Observer on August 29, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Reports   |   India

Dangerous pursuit: In India, journalists who cover corruption may pay with their lives

In the 27 cases of journalists murdered for their work in India since CPJ began keeping records in 1992, there have been no convictions. More than half of those killed reported regularly on corruption. The cases of Jagendra Singh, Umesh Rajput, and Akshay Singh, who died between 2011 and 2015, show how small-town journalists face greater risk in their reporting than those from larger outlets, and how India’s culture of impunity is leaving the country’s press vulnerable to threats and attacks. A special report by the Committee to Protect Journalists

August 29, 2016 12:00 AM ET

Reports   |   India

Dangerous Pursuit

Foreword: Journalism as well as journalists in danger from failure to stand up for India’s press

P. Sainath

This report by the Committee to Protect Journalists does more than tell us that reporting in India can be a dangerous business. Rural and small-town journalists are at greater risk of being killed in retaliation for their work than those in the big cities but, as this report shows, factors such as a journalist’s location, outlet, level in the profession’s hierarchy, and social background add to that risk. The language a reporter writes in and, most importantly, what they are writing about—especially if it challenges the powerful—increase the vulnerability.

Reports   |   India

Dangerous Pursuit

Impunity and lack of solidarity expose India’s journalists to attack

By Sumit Galhotra

Corruption scandals make for attention-grabbing headlines, but when journalists who expose wrongdoing are killed, their murder is often the end of the story. For eight years India has been a fixture on the Committee to Protect Journalists’ annual Impunity Index, which spotlights countries where journalists are slain and their killers go free. Perpetrators are seldom arrested and CPJ has not recorded a single conviction upheld in any of the cases of journalists murdered in India in direct relation to their work.

Reports   |   India

Dangerous Pursuit

Jagendra Singh: discredited after death

By Sumit Galhotra and Raksha Kumar

Covered in burns and writhing in pain, Jagendra Singh cries out, “They could have arrested me. Why did they have to beat me and set me on fire?” In the video, filmed at a hospital in Lucknow where Jagendra Singh was being treated for burns that covered 60 percent of his body, the journalist accuses a police officer, Sriprakash Rai, and his team, of dousing him in gasoline and setting him alight. A week after the attack, Jagendra Singh died from his injuries.

Reports   |   India

Dangerous Pursuit

In search of justice for Umesh Rajput

By Sumit Galhotra and Raksha Kumar

Parmeshwar Rajput walked exhausted into his lawyer’s office in Bilaspur, weighed down by a black bag filled with court documents, police records, and newspaper clippings about his brother’s death, after the six-hour train and motorbike journey he had taken from his village of Hirabatar so he could meet with CPJ. The 36-year-old is accustomed to frequently traveling with these files. They are his only hope that the killers of his brother, Umesh Rajput, will be brought to justice.

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