Middle East & North Africa

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat

While the danger faced by cartoonists is brought into focus by the attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, the threats far exceed Islamic extremism. A CPJ special report finds that as their work transcends borders and languages and simplifies complex political situations, cartoonists around the world are being imprisoned, forced into hiding, threatened with legal action or killed. In Malaysia, political cartoonist Zunar, pictured, could face decades in prison for his work.

Slideshow: Cartoonists share their work
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(AP/Joshua Paul)

Statements   |   Iran

Iran must respect transparency in Jason Rezaian trial

New York, May 22, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on Iran to ensure a fair and transparent trial for Washington Post correspondent Jason Rezaian, and to allow the reporter's defense team and employer access to court proceedings. Rezaian, who has been held in jail since July 2014, is due to appear in court in Tehran on May 26, according to reports.

May 22, 2015 12:19 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Egypt

In Egypt, editor accused of publishing false news

Washington, D.C. May 19, 2015--Egyptian authorities today released on bail the editor-in-chief of the privately owned weekly El-Bayan after arresting the journalist on Monday and accusing him of publishing false news, according to news reports.

May 19, 2015 5:21 PM ET

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Reports   |   Bangladesh, Denmark, Ecuador, France, India, Iran, Malaysia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, USA, Venezuela

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat

On January 7, two gunmen burst into the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing eight journalists and bringing into focus the risks cartoonists face. But with the ability of their work to transcend borders and languages, and to simplify complex political situations, the threats faced by cartoonists around the world—who are being imprisoned, forced into hiding, threatened with legal action or killed—far exceed Islamic extremism. A Committee to Protect Journalists special report by Shawn W. Crispin

Alerts   |   Qatar

Qatar detains international journalists for the second time this year

New York, May 18, 2015--For the second time in two months, an international news crew was arrested and interrogated by Qatari security officials while they were reporting on the human rights situation in Qatar in the run-up to the 2022 World Cup, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the detention and calls on the Qatari government to allow local and international journalists to report freely in the country.

Impact   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Latvia, Myanmar, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, April 2015

CPJ launches annual publication Attacks on the Press


At a U.N. press conference on April 27 to launch CPJ's annual publication Attacks on the Press, CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon called on the U.N. Security Council to include in its May 27 debate on Journalist Safety a warning to states that they should not use national security as an excuse to jail, harass, or censor journalists.

The last three years have been the most deadly for the press, according to CPJ research. One of the reasons is the developing "terror dynamic"--non-state actors targeting journalists with violence while governments restrict civil liberties and press freedom in response. This phenomenon was amply documented in essays published in this year's edition of Attacks on the Press.

The book, which emphasizes reporting and analysis by CPJ staff and outside experts, features essays on multiple threats facing the press: the conflict in Syria, where freelancers and local journalists must adapt to an environment in which they are targets; terror and criminal groups, in countries as Syria, Nigeria, and Mexico, which document their own atrocities and disseminate them through social media; and crackdowns on the press in Ethiopia and Egypt, where governments use the threat of terror to justify repression. Several essays in the book also look at the impact of surveillance in more democratic societies, including those in Europe. The book also includes CPJ's list of the 10 Most Censored Countries.

The print edition of Attacks on the Press is published by Bloomberg Press, an imprint of Wiley, and is available for purchase.

May 7, 2015 4:24 PM ET

Alerts   |   Yemen

Journalist kidnapped in Yemen as conflict intensifies

New York, May 7, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls for the immediate release of Yemeni journalist Waheed al-Sufi, who has been held for more than a month by unidentified kidnappers. Al-Sufi is the editor-in-chief of the Yemeni weekly newspaper Al-Arabiya and its website, Al-Arabiya Online, according to news reports and his family.

Blog   |   CPJ

On World Press Freedom Day and journalists' safety

Last week, I met a Cameroonian journalist who worked in the Congo until he fled following a series of threats and an attack on his home by armed men who assaulted his sister. Elie Smith, a TV host who documented alleged abuses by police and was outspoken in his criticism of the government, said he thought he had been under surveillance and that he had received multiple threats via text message.

Case   |   Jordan

Jordan jails journalist for criticizing Saudi campaign in Yemen

A Jordanian journalist was arrested on April 23, 2015, after publishing an article the week before that criticized Operation Decisive Storm, the bombing campaign by a Saudi-led coalition including Jordan against Houthi forces in Yemen.

Attacks on the Press   |   Egypt, France, Greece, Pakistan, Paraguay, Syria

Foreword

In Pakistan, an unknown gunman shoots a news anchor multiple times. No one is arrested for the crime, though arrest warrants are issued against the journalist--for his reporting.

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