Middle East & North Africa

Blog   |   CPJ

On World Press Freedom Day and journalists' safety

Last week, I met a Cameroonian journalist who worked in the Congo until he fled following a series of threats and an attack on his home by armed men who assaulted his sister. Elie Smith, a TV host who documented alleged abuses by police and was outspoken in his criticism of the government, said he thought he had been under surveillance and that he had received multiple threats via text message.

Case   |   Jordan

Jordan jails journalist for criticizing Saudi campaign in Yemen

A Jordanian journalist was arrested on April 23, 2015, after publishing an article the week before that criticized Operation Decisive Storm, the bombing campaign by a Saudi-led coalition including Jordan against Houthi forces in Yemen.

Attacks on the Press   |   Egypt, France, Greece, Pakistan, Paraguay, Syria

Foreword

In Pakistan, an unknown gunman shoots a news anchor multiple times. No one is arrested for the crime, though arrest warrants are issued against the journalist--for his reporting.

Attacks on the Press   |   Syria

Covering war for the first time--in Syria

Journalists are trained in battlefield medicine by Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues, or RISC, in New York City. Mike Shum, left, and Holly Pickett prepare to move a training dummy simulating an injured person during a care-under-fire exercise. (AP/RISC, James Lawler Duggan)

The small room in the back of the Monsours' house was set up for two people: two desks, two nightstands, and two beds. The beds had matching sheets and pillowcases adorned with Superman cartoon characters.

Attacks on the Press   |   Syria

The rules of conflict reporting are changing

Free Syrian Army fighters are filmed as they run towards the fence of the Menagh military airport, trying to avoid snipers loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo's countryside on January 6, 2013. (Reuters/Mahmoud Hassano)

On the icy-cold morning of February 22, 2012, Marie Colvin, a 58-year-old Irish-American reporter, was killed by the blast of a rocket in the Baba Amr neighborhood of Homs, Syria.

Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico, Nigeria, Syria

Broadcasting murder: Militants use media for deadly purpose

A militant uses a mobile phone to film fellow Islamic State fighters taking part in a military parade along the streets of Syria's Raqqa province on June 30, 2014. (Reuters/Stringer)

News of the August 19, 2014, murder of journalist James Foley broke not in the media but instead on Twitter. News organizations faced the agonizing questions of how to report on the killing and what portions of the video to show. If a group or individual commits an act of violence, and then films it, how can traditional news organizations cover it without amplifying the propaganda message?

Attacks on the Press   |   Libya

Lack of media coverage compounds violence in Libya

The mother, right, of photographer Nadhir Ktari, who disappeared with fellow journalist Sofiane Chourabi in Libya in September 2014, attends a demonstration held in solidarity with the missing pair, in Tunis on January 9, 2015. (Reuters/Anis Mili)

Near the end of August 2014, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates launched airstrikes against what were characterized as Islamist-allied militias fighting near Tripoli, Libya. Or maybe they didn't. The New York Times broke the story on August 25, 2014; Egypt denied it, the UAE didn't comment, and U.S. officials made seemingly conflicting statements.

Attacks on the Press   |   Egypt

We completely agree: Egyptian media in the era of President el-Sisi

Journalists protest the imprisonment in Egypt of Al-Jazeera staffers Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed outside the network's offices in Sanaa, Yemen, on June 25, 2014. (Reuters/Khaled Abdullah)

If there were any doubt about who the presidential frontrunner would be in Egypt's May 2014 elections, the Egyptian media made sure to strongly suggest that then-Defense Minister Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi was the only choice.

Attacks on the Press   |   Egypt, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen

Treating the Internet as the enemy in the Middle East

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans against the military and government during a protest in Cairo on November 28, 2014. (Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany)

The snow and freezing temperatures that struck Saudi Arabia unexpectedly in December 2013 were newsworthy in a desert kingdom better known for its extreme heat. But the fact that the ensuing power outages at a regional prison left prisoners without power or heat for nearly a week was apparently off-limits to reporters.

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