Special Reports & Publications

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Brazil, India, Iraq, Libya, Mexico, Pakistan, Somalia, Syria, Turkey, Ukraine, Yemen

Journalist killings ease from record highs as murders down, combat deaths up

Deadly violence against the media eased in 2016 from recent record levels as the number of journalists singled out for murder declined. A CPJ special report by Elana Beiser and Elisabeth Witchel

Osama Jumaa, a photographer and video journalist, was killed while covering the aftermath of a bombardment in Syria. (Images Live)

Reports   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Cameroon, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, India, Iran, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nigeria, Panama, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Syria, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia

Turkey's crackdown propels number of journalists in jail worldwide to record high

At least 81 journalists are imprisoned in Turkey, all of them facing anti-state charges, in the wake of an unprecedented crackdown that has included the shuttering of more than 100 news outlets. The 259 journalists in jail worldwide is the highest number recorded since 1990. A CPJ special report by Elana Beiser

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Iraq, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria

Getting Away With Murder

CPJ’s 2016 Global Impunity Index spotlights countries where journalists are slain and the killers go free

By Elisabeth Witchel, CPJ Impunity Campaign Consultant

Published October 27, 2016.

Some of the highest rates of impunity in the murders of journalists can be attributed to killings by Islamist militant groups, CPJ found in its latest Global Impunity Index, which spotlights countries where journalists are murdered and their killers go free. The worst country for the second year in a row is Somalia, where the militant group al-Shabaab is suspected in the majority of media murders, followed by Iraq and Syria, where members of the militant group Islamic State murdered at least six journalists in the past year.

Reports   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba: More space for criticism but restrictions slow press freedom progress

Cuba’s press, emboldened by President Raúl Castro’s call for reforms in 2010, are finding more space for critical comment, but harassment and intimidation from authorities, a legal limbo caused by outdated and restrictive press laws, and limited and expensive access to the internet is slowing the island nation’s progress toward press freedom. A special report by the Committee to Protect Journalists

September 28, 2016 9:00 AM ET

Reports   |   India

Dangerous pursuit: In India, journalists who cover corruption may pay with their lives

In the 27 cases of journalists murdered for their work in India since CPJ began keeping records in 1992, there have been no convictions. More than half of those killed reported regularly on corruption. The cases of Jagendra Singh, Umesh Rajput, and Akshay Singh, who died between 2011 and 2015, show how small-town journalists face greater risk in their reporting than those from larger outlets, and how India’s culture of impunity is leaving the country’s press vulnerable to threats and attacks. A special report by the Committee to Protect Journalists

August 29, 2016 12:00 AM ET

Reports

Critics Are Not Criminals: Comparative Study of Criminal Defamation Laws in the Americas

Criminal defamation prosecutions are still widespread throughout the Americas. In a new special report, prepared by Debevoise & Plimpton LLP in collaboration with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, CPJ finds a total of 32 out of 33 countries in the hemisphere maintain criminal penalties for defamation.

March 2, 2016 11:00 AM ET

Reports   |   Bangladesh, Brazil, France, Iraq, Mexico, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria, Turkey, Yemen

Syria, France most deadly countries for the press

Of 69 journalists killed for their work in 2015, 40 percent died at the hands of Islamic militant groups such as Al-Qaeda and Islamic State. More than two-thirds of the total killed were singled out for murder. A CPJ special report by Elana Beiser

Cartoonists Renald Luzier, left, and Patrick Pelloux at a solidarity march in Paris for their colleagues killed in the attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. In 2015, 28 journalists were killed by Islamic militants. (AFP/Eric Feferberg)

Reports   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Cameroon, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, India, Iran, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, Turkmenistan, UAE, Uzbekistan, Vietnam

China, Egypt imprison record numbers of journalists

Egypt is second only to China as the world’s worst jailer of journalists in 2015. Worldwide, the number of journalists behind bars for their work declined moderately during the year, but a handful of countries continue to use systematic imprisonment to silence criticism. A CPJ special report by Elana Beiser

The Egyptian photojournalist known as Shawkan appears before a court in Cairo in May 2015 for the first time after more than 600 days in jail. A record number of journalists are imprisoned in Egypt in 2015. (AP/Lobna Tarek)

Reports   |   Bahrain, Egypt, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Syria, Turkey, Vietnam

Slideshow: Journalists freed

While just under 200 journalists are behind bars, CPJ witnessed several memorable releases in 2015, including in Vietnam, Ethiopia, and even secretive Eritrea. Some of the journalists had spent years behind bars; they endured isolation and several say they were tortured. This year, CPJ’s advocacy contributed to the release of at least 31 journalists. Some of their stories are shown here.

Reports   |   Tunisia

In Tunisia, press freedom erodes amid security fears

Hard-earned press freedom in Tunisia is under threat as journalists are squeezed between violent extremists and security services sensitive to criticism in the wake of deadly terror attacks. While Islamist militants threaten the media, the government introduces restrictive legislation and security forces legally harass and even assault journalists. In this climate, which is further restricted by regulatory disputes, some news outlets resort to self-censorship. A CPJ special report by Safa Ben Said

A journalist holds up a television frame during a protest in 2012. Tunisian news outlets have come under pressure in 2015. (Reuters/Anis Mili)
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