Road to justice: Breaking cycle of impunity

Despite increased international attention to the murders of journalists, governments fail to take action to reduce the high rates of targeted violence and impunity, the Committee to Protect Journalists finds. In the past 10 years, 370 journalists were murdered; in 90 percent of cases, there are no convictions. The unchecked, unsolved murders of journalists is one of the greatest threats to press freedom today.
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Reports   |   Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, India, Iraq, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syria

Getting Away With Murder

CPJ's 2015 Global Impunity Index spotlights countries where journalists are slain and the killers go free

Published October 8, 2015

The ambush of a convoy in South Sudan and the hacking deaths of bloggers in Bangladesh this year propelled the two nations onto CPJ's Global Impunity Index, which spotlights countries where journalists are murdered and their killers go unpunished. Colombia exited the index as fatal violence against journalists receded further into that country's past.

For the first time since CPJ began compiling the index in 2008, Iraq did not claim the title of worst offender, as Somalia edged into that spot. The shift reflects a steady death toll in Somalia, where one or more journalists have been murdered every year over the past decade, and the government has proved unable or unwilling to investigate the attacks.

Press Releases   |   China, Ecuador, Egypt, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia

As world leaders take to UNGA stage, CPJ highlights countries of concern

Press freedom records of Egypt, Russia, Iran, China, Nigeria, Mexico, Ecuador

New York, September 25, 2015--Each year, the world's leaders are invited to New York for the United Nations General Assembly, where they are given a platform to speak freely and openly. But while the leaders of many countries enjoy this privilege, their journalists back home are jailed, threatened, attacked, or even killed for reporting the news.

Blog   |   Mexico

'Pedro Canché Law' obscures the real problem in Quintana Roo

Roberto Borge, governor of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo, says a new law is meant to protect journalists, but they say it is a joke. (AP/Israel Leal)

Mayan journalist Pedro Canché spent 271 days in prison on charges of sabotage. Authorities alleged Canché organized protests one year ago against rising water bills in the Zona Maya south of Cancún, in Quintana Roo state, where demonstrators stormed the offices of the local waterworks, CPJ research shows.

September 1, 2015 2:00 PM ET

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Blog   |   Mexico

The murder of Mexican photographer Espinosa has touched a nerve

A protester holds up a photograph of Rubén Espinosa, a journalist who was killed after he fled Veracruz state. Hundreds of journalists, writers, and artists have signed on to a letter calling on the Mexican government to end the cycle of violence in Mexico. (Reuters/Henry Romero)

The July 31 murder of Mexican photographer Rubén Espinosa hit the press freedom community really hard. Espinosa, who was found in an apartment with four female victims--all of them shot in the head--had fled the state of Veracruz in June and sought refuge in Mexico City, where he thought he would be safe from threats and intimidation.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Mexican photojournalist who fled violent Veracruz state murdered in capital

Mexico City, August 3, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the murder of Mexican photojournalist Rubén Espinosa and calls on authorities to investigative all motives in the killing and ensure the perpetrators are held to account. Espinosa, who had fled to the capital from Veracruz state after receiving threats, was found murdered in a Mexico City apartment on Friday, according to news reports.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Journalist found dead in Veracruz, Mexico

New York, July 7, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on Mexican authorities in the state of Veracruz to consider journalism as a motive in the death last week of Mexican journalist Juan Mendoza Delgado, investigate the case thoroughly, and ensure the killers are brought to justice.

Statements   |   Mexico

Journalist gunned down outside radio station in Mexico

New York, July 2, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns today's murder of Mexican journalist Filadelfo Sánchez Sarmiento in Miahuatlán de Porfirio Díaz, a municipality in the southern state of Oaxaca. Sánchez was shot at about 9:30 a.m. outside the offices of radio station La Favorita 103.3FM La Voz de la Sierra Sur, where he hosted a news program, according to news reports. The journalist had also written for local newspapers, according to reports. Sánchez had received threatening phone calls, reports said, without providing further details.

Statements   |   Mexico

CPJ welcomes release of imprisoned journalist in Mexico

New York, May 29, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the release today of Mexican journalist Pedro Celestino Canché Herrera, who had been imprisoned on charges of sabotage in the state of Quintana Roo since August. A local court on Thursday declared Canché innocent of the charges and ordered him to be released, Canché's lawyer, Maria Araceli Andrade Tomala, told CPJ.

Blog   |   Mexico

In Mexico, reporters struggle to cover unrest over missing students

Graffiti referring to 43 students who went missing last September is spray painted on a wall in Mexico City as part of protests about their disappearance. Some journalists say they have struggled to cover the case. (Reuters/Tomas Bravo)

Veteran reporter Sergio Ocampo was having a late dinner on September 26 when his editor called about a shooting in the city of Iguala in Guerrero state. Students from the Ayotzinapa teacher training college were apparently among the victims. But when Ocampo, a correspondent for the newspaper La Jornada, called the then-mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, he was told, "Nothing happened." The mayor added, "They came from Ayotzinapa to do their destruction here," Ocampo recalled.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Veracruz journalist shot dead after reporting on oil theft

Mexico City, May 6, 2015--The body of Veracruz radio journalist Armando Saldaña Morales was found on Monday in the neighboring Mexican state of Oaxaca, according to the Oaxaca state attorney general's office and news reports. The journalist had been shot dead, the reports said. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the murder and calls on authorities to identify the motive in the killing and ensure the perpetrators are held to account.

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