Canada

Press under surveillance in Canada

Authorities in Canada undermine press freedom as courts grant warrants that allow police to spy on at least eight journalists and Quebec police seize the laptop of La Journal de Montréal reporter Michael Nguyen. VICE reporter Ben Makuch appeals a court order forcing him to hand over details of communication with a source. Rights groups condemn calls for expanded surveillance and weakened encryption.

Video: Canada's press freedom under threat
• Timeline of surveillance
Reuters

Alerts   |   Canada

Canadian reporter faces charges after covering protests

Justin Brake interviews protesters at Muskrat Falls, Labrador, in the fall of 2016. (Janet Cooper)

New York, March 17, 2017--Canadian authorities should immediately drop all charges against journalist Justin Brake, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Brake is scheduled to appear in court on April 11 to answer charges of criminal mischief and contempt of court in connection with his reporting on a protest in the eastern Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador last year.

March 17, 2017 3:15 PM ET

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Blog   |   Canada

Surveillance of journalists and court orders puts Canada's press freedom at risk

VICE News reporter Ben Makuch is appealing a court order to make him hand over details of his communication with a source. (VICE News)

On February 6, VICE News reporter Ben Makuch is due to appear in court to appeal an order requesting that he hand over details of his communication with a source. The hearing comes ahead of a day of action being planned in Canada for February 25, when press freedom and privacy activists are due to lobby the government over issues including surveillance powers and an anti-terrorism bill.

Statements   |   Canada

Montreal police spied on La Presse reporter Patrick Lagacé

New York, October 31, 2016--Montreal police have been tracking an iPhone belonging to La Presse reporter Patrick Lagacé since the beginning of the year, the journalist's paper reported today. Canadian courts authorized 24 warrants to surveil Lagacé's phone, according to court documents obtained by the French-language Montreal daily. The warrants allowed police to access the journalist's call register and track him by activating a GPS monitor on his phone, according to reports.

October 31, 2016 6:24 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Canada

Canadian court sets troubling precedent for press freedom

New York, April 4, 2016 - A Canadian court's decision compelling a journalist to hand over private communications he had with a source sets a negative precedent for press freedom, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

April 4, 2016 3:17 PM ET

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Blog   |   Canada, China, USA

China's overseas critics under pressure from smear campaigns, cyber attacks

"I think my actions ... have harmed the national interest. What I have done was very wrong. I seriously and earnestly accept to learn a lesson and plead guilty," said Chinese journalist Gao Yu during a televised confession on the state-run channel CCTV in May 2014.

Blog   |   Canada, Egypt

CPJ joins call for Canada to help free Al-Jazeera journalist Mohamed Fahmy

The Committee to Protect Journalists has signed a joint letter calling on Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to take immediate action to have jailed Al-Jazeera journalist Mohamed Fahmy deported from Egypt to Canada. CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon and Middle East and North Africa Program Coordinator Sherif Mansour signed the letter to Harper along with more than 300 other prominent public figures and human rights groups.

Statements   |   Canada, Somalia

CPJ welcomes arrest of suspect behind Somali kidnapping

New York, June 12, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the arrest in Canada on Thursday of Ali Omar Ader, a Somali allegedly involved in the 2008 kidnapping of journalists Amanda Lindhout, Nigel Brennan, and Abdifatah Mohamed Elmi, a Somali fixer and photojournalist. Ali, who appeared briefly in court in Ottawa today, is alleged to be the main negotiator of the kidnappers and faces hostage-taking charges, according to a statement by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Attacks on the Press   |   Canada, UK, USA

Surveillance forces journalists to think and act like spies

Graffiti attributed to the street artist Banksy is seen near the offices of Britain's eavesdropping agency, Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, in Cheltenham, England, on April 16, 2014. (Reuters/Eddie Keogh)

Once upon a time, a journalist never gave up a confidential source. When someone comes forward, anonymously, to inform the public, it's better to risk time incarcerated than give them up. This ethical responsibility was also a practical and professional necessity. If you promise anonymity, you're obliged to deliver. If you can't keep your word, who will trust you in the future? Sources go elsewhere and stories pass you by.

Statements   |   Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, UK, USA

G-7 acknowledges post-2015 agenda should include governance, human rights

New York, June 5, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the declaration today by leaders of the Group of Seven leading industrial nations that democratic governance and human rights should be integral to the post-2015 development agenda.  The United Nations is seeking agreement on a broad set of sustainable development objectives to replace the Millennium Development Goals, which expire in 2015 and which made no mention of political or civil rights. The new goals will provide a framework for donor aid and thus influence priorities for years to come.

Alerts   |   Canada, Syria

Two journalists killed in two days in Syria

New York, March 10, 2014--Two journalists were killed over the weekend while covering the conflict in Syria, the deadliest country for the press.

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