Singapore / Asia

Journalists attacked in Singapore since 1992

  
Government Technology Agency staff demonstrate Singapore's new contact-tracing smartphone app called TraceTogether, as a preventive measure against the COVID-19 coronavirus on March 20, 2020. Bill Marczak, an expert in cellphone surveillance technology, told CPJ about the implications for journalists as governments ramp up their capacity to monitor citizens in a time of crisis. (AFP/Catherine Lai)

Expert Bill Marczak: What journalists should know about coronavirus cellphone tracking

Governments all over the world have been considering cellphone surveillance to help track and contain the spread of the coronavirus.

Read More ›

Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is seen in Singapore on November 15, 2018. The prime minister recently threatened to sue the editor of a local news website for libel. (AFP/Lillian Suwanrumpha)

Singapore prime minister threatens to sue The Online Citizen for libel

Bangkok, September 3, 2019 — Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong should drop his legal threat against news website The Online Citizen and cease his government’s long-running legal harassment of independent media, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Read More ›

The Singapore parliament building is seen on April 29, 2019. The parliament recently passed a restrictive 'fake news' bill that endangers press freedom. (AFP/Roslan Rahman)

Singapore passes ‘fake news’ legislation that threatens press

Bangkok, May 9, 2019 — The Committee to Protect Journalists today condemned the Singapore parliament’s passage of legislation that could be used to stifle reporting and the dissemination of news, and called for the punitive measure’s immediate repeal.

Read More ›

Singapore's Parliament House is seen on March 20, 2019. The country is currently considering a law that poses a threat to freedom of speech online. (Roslan Rahman/AFP)

Singapore ‘fake news’ legislation endangers press freedom

Bangkok, April 2, 2019 — The Committee to Protect Journalists called today on the Singapore parliament to reject legislation that would force online platforms to take down or amend news or information authorities deem as false.

Read More ›

Singapore's Merlion statue is lit up in front of the city skyline in March 2018. Authorities are investigating a criminal defamation complaint against an independent news website. (AFP/Roslan Rahman)

Singapore police seize equipment, interrogate editor of The Online Citizen

On November 20, 2018, five police officers seized a desktop computer, mobile devices, and laptops from the Singapore home of Terry Xu, chief editor of the independent news website The Online Citizen, according to news reports. Xu was summoned to the city-state’s Cantonment Complex at 3pm that day, where authorities interrogated him for over eight…

Read More ›

A bird's-eye view of ships along the coast in Singapore in July 2017. Singapore's parliament is considering draft legislation that would prevent journalists from reporting on what was happening terror attacks.(Reuters/Jorge Silva)

Singapore draft law aims to censor reporting on terror attacks

Bangkok, February 28, 2018–Draft anti-terrorism legislation under consideration in Singapore would imperil press freedom by banning journalists from covering terror attacks, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Read More ›

Turkey’s crackdown propels number of journalists in jail worldwide to record high

At least 81 journalists are imprisoned in Turkey, all of them facing anti-state charges, in the wake of an unprecedented crackdown that has included the shuttering of more than 100 news outlets. The 259 journalists in jail worldwide is the highest number recorded since 1990. A CPJ special report by Elana Beiser

Read More ›

Demonstrators protesting the trial of blogger Amos Yee hold pictures of the late Lee Kuan Yew, founder of modern Singapore, on July 5, 2015. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

Proposed law on contempt of court threatens press freedom in Singapore

Bangkok, August 5, 2016 – Singaporean lawmakers should scrap proposed legislation on what constitutes contempt of court in news reporting and public commentary, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The draft law’s penalties for violations, including possible prison terms for criticizing the judiciary, threaten to entrench more self-censorship in Singapore’s constrained media environment.

Read More ›

Singapore court sentences online editor for sedition

Bangkok, March 24, 2016 – The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns a Singaporean court’s sentencing Wednesday of an Australian editor of a now-defunct independent Singaporean news website, and calls on authorities to stop jailing journalists and censoring websites.

Read More ›

Singapore blogger Roy Ngerng addresses a crowd protesting website regulations in June 2013. The blogger faces damages in a defamation suit brought against him by the prime minister. (Reuters/Edgar Su)

Blogger in Singapore faces financial ruin following defamation suit

“If we want our freedom, we have to fight for it,” wrote blogger Roy Ngerng last year after he was sued for defamation by Singapore’s prime minister. The case was sparked by a blog post in which Ngerng allegedly suggested Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong had misappropriated funds in a state pension system. In November,…

Read More ›