Colombia

Road to justice: Breaking cycle of impunity

Despite increased international attention to the murders of journalists, governments fail to take action to reduce the high rates of targeted violence and impunity, the Committee to Protect Journalists finds. In the past 10 years, 370 journalists were murdered; in 90 percent of cases, there are no convictions. The unchecked, unsolved murders of journalists is one of the greatest threats to press freedom today.
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AFP

Impact   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Colombia, Syria

CPJ highlights challenges to female journalists, reporter released from prison, CPJ hosts book talk

CPJ Newsletter: May edition

CPJ publishes annual edition of Attacks on the Press

On April 27, CPJ launched its annual publication of Attacks on the Press. This edition, which focuses on gender and media freedom worldwide, highlights the challenges faced by female journalists who fight to report the news against all odds. The book--and the dialogue it has already generated--is an important step in the fight toward ending sexual violence against female journalists.

(CPJ/Sumit Galhotra)

Attacks on the Press   |   Colombia, Security

The Sadness of May the 25th

To rewrite one's story, when it is so painful, feels like a kind of suicide. Psychologists would say that is part of a grieving process, helping close nefarious chapters in life. We, the victims of sexual violence, are often told that. But I think it would be more helpful to the goal of moving forward if receiving justice were part of the process.

Impact   |   Azerbaijan, Colombia, Turkey, UAE

CPJ turns 35, jailed journalists walk free, reporters on trial in Turkey, and more

CPJ Newsletter: April edition

Four imprisoned journalists freed in Azerbaijan

The president of Azerbaijan in March issued a decree pardoning 148 people, including three imprisoned journalists--Hilal Mamedov, Tofiq Yaqublu, and Parviz Hashimli.

Statements   |   Colombia

In Colombia, second attacker sentenced in Jineth Bedoya case

New York, March 18, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the sentencing today of former paramilitary fighter Mario Jaimes Mejía who, according to reports, was handed a 28-year prison term for the kidnap, rape, and torture of Colombian journalist Jineth Bedoya Lima in 2000. Last month, Alejandro Cárdenas Orozco, a former paramilitary fighter, was sentenced to 11 years in prison for the kidnap and torture of Bedoya.

March 18, 2016 5:39 PM ET

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Impact   |   Bahrain, Bangladesh, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Turkey, Zimbabwe

CPJ Newsletter: March edition

Landmark conviction in 2000 attack on Colombian journalist

A suspect has been convicted in the 2000 attack on Colombian journalist Jineth Bedoya, pictured at left. (AFP/Dalberto Roque)

A Colombian court on February 26 convicted a former paramilitary fighter in the kidnapping and torture of Colombian journalist Jineth Bedoya and sentenced him to 11 years in prison. The fighter, Alejandro Cárdenas Orozco, was also ordered to pay a fine of around US$17,500.

Alerts   |   Colombia

Ex-paramilitary fighter jailed for 11 years over Jineth Bedoya attack in Colombia

A former paramilitary fighter has been jailed for 11 years over an attack on Colombian journalist Jineth Bedoya, pictured, in 2000 (AFP/Dalberto Roque)

New York, February 26, 2016--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the sentencing Thursday of former paramilitary fighter Alejandro Cárdenas Orozco to 11 years in prison for the kidnap and torture of Colombian journalist Jineth Bedoya Lima in 2000.

February 26, 2016 5:42 PM ET

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Blog   |   Colombia

Are intelligence sector reforms enough to protect Colombia's journalists?

Since taking power President Santos, above, has introduced reforms to the intelligence sector but journalists and privacy groups have questioned their effectiveness. (AFP/Guillermo Legaria)

When Colombia's national intelligence agency, known as DAS, was disbanded in October 2011 after revelations of illegal surveillance and harassment of the press and public figures, many journalists breathed a sigh of relief. But recent claims of reporters being spied on and government agencies buying advanced surveillance technology without ensuring clear guidelines over its use, has raised questions about the country's commitment to ending abusive practices.

Blog   |   Colombia

Claims police spied on two journalists revive surveillance fears of Colombia's press

When Claudia Morales's six-year-old daughter asks about her mother's bodyguards, the Colombian journalist tells her they are colleagues. "She's too young to understand," Morales, who works for the Bogotá-based Caracol Radio in the city of Armenia, told CPJ in a telephone interview. Vicky Dávila, the news director of LA Fm Radio who also has private security, said that her 14-year-old son is afraid and has asked why they don't leave their home in Bogotá.

Impact   |   Bangladesh, Colombia, Cuba, Egypt, Mexico, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, Republic of Congo, Syria, Vietnam

CPJ Newsletter: A year in review

Over the past year, CPJ has documented anti-press violations all over the world, cases of journalists killed, imprisoned, abducted, or threatened in relation to their work. You can see all of our coverage at our website, www.cpj.org.

But here at CPJ Impact we also highlight those times when CPJ has stepped in and advocated for journalists under threat. This year, we made some vital gains in our fight to protect journalists and press freedom.

We know we couldn't have done this without your support. Please continue to join us in our important work.



December 26, 2015 8:30 AM ET

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, India, Iraq, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syria

Getting Away With Murder

CPJ's 2015 Global Impunity Index spotlights countries where journalists are slain and the killers go free

Published October 8, 2015

The ambush of a convoy in South Sudan and the hacking deaths of bloggers in Bangladesh this year propelled the two nations onto CPJ's Global Impunity Index, which spotlights countries where journalists are murdered and their killers go unpunished. Colombia exited the index as fatal violence against journalists receded further into that country's past.

For the first time since CPJ began compiling the index in 2008, Iraq did not claim the title of worst offender, as Somalia edged into that spot. The shift reflects a steady death toll in Somalia, where one or more journalists have been murdered every year over the past decade, and the government has proved unable or unwilling to investigate the attacks.

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