Asia

China tightens controls another notch

Chinese regulators issue a sweeping ban on websites' original news programs, soon after a website runs a headline with a typographical error. More information and internet controls are expected under Xu Lin, the new head of the Cyberspace Administration of China. A Hong Kong magazine publisher and an editor are sentenced to prison in mainland China for "running an illegal business." Two journalists are detained for "picking quarrels and provoking trouble," weeks after two other writers are sentenced to more than 10 years in prison for "subversion."

Data:Journalists imprisoned in 2015
AP

Alerts   |   Thailand

Thailand pressures two broadcast journalists off the air

Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha arrives for a cabinet meeting in Bangkok on August 9, 2016. He has empowered a state media regulator to close news outlets without the right to appeal for reasons of national security. (AP/Sakchai Lalit)

Bangkok, August 18, 2016--Two television reporters in Thailand have been suspended for a 10-day period under pressure from military authorities and state media regulators over their critical news coverage, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists today called on Thailand's ruling military regime to cease its systematic harassment of the broadcast media and allow reporters to do their jobs without interference or fear of reprisal.

Blog   |   China

As Beijing tightens grip on Hong Kong media, mainland journalists suffer

A cover of Time magazine on display in Hong Kong, July 22, 2016, features portraits of Chinese leader Xi Jinping and former leader Mao Zedong. (AP/Vincent Yu)

On August 1, prominent Chinese human rights lawyer Wang Yu, who had been detained incommunicado for over a year, reemerged--with an unusual twist on an old script. Wang gave a TV interview in which she renounced her legal work and accused foreign forces of using her to "attack" and "smear" the Chinese government; the report claimed she'd just been released on bail. The public statement of guilt without trial is part of an established pattern in China, with more than a dozen such "confessions" delivered by human rights activists, journalists, and writers. But this time, the state-owned China Central Television (CCTV) failed to play a role. Instead, the interview was carried by a website affiliated with the Hong Kong newspaper Oriental Daily.

Alerts   |   Bangladesh

Bangladesh journalists could face 14 years in prison for refuting rumor

New York, August 12, 2016 -- Bangladeshi authorities should drop all criminal proceedings against three journalists from the news website banglamail24, release them immediately, and restore press credentials to nine of their colleagues, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The three journalists could face a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison if charged and convicted under a law governing online publication.

Alerts   |   India

Indian journalist, magazine face criminal complaint for investigative report

Supporters of India's ruling, Hindu nationalist BJP party greet Narendra Modi, then a candidate for prime minister, at a March 31, 2014, campaign rally in the northeastern state of Assam. (Reuters)

New York, August 11, 2016 - Indian authorities should shelve a criminal complaint against the weekly Indian magazine Outlook, its leadership, and freelance journalist Neha Dixit, and ensure the safety of the journalist and Outlook's staff, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Alerts   |   Maldives

New Maldives criminal defamation law threatens press freedom

Maldivian police watch over an opposition demonstration in February 2012. (Reuters/Dinuka Liyanawatte)

New York, August 10, 2016--Maldivian President Abdulla Yameen Abdul Gayoom should veto a criminal defamation law the parliament passed yesterday, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The legislation threatens to stifle criticism and investigative reporting.

August 10, 2016 5:03 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Pakistan

At least two journalists killed in Pakistan blast

Civil society activists in Peshawar pay tribute to the victims of a bomb attack on mourners at a hospital in Quetta, August 8, 2016. At least two journalists were killed in the blast. (AP/Mohammad Sajjad)

Washington, August 8, 2016 -- At least two journalists were among at least 70 people killed in a massive bomb blast at a hospital in Quetta, Pakistan, today, according to press reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemned the attack.

Alerts   |   Singapore

Proposed law on contempt of court threatens press freedom in Singapore

Demonstrators protesting the trial of blogger Amos Yee hold pictures of the late Lee Kuan Yew, founder of modern Singapore, on July 5, 2015. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

Bangkok, August 5, 2016 - Singaporean lawmakers should scrap proposed legislation on what constitutes contempt of court in news reporting and public commentary, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The draft law's penalties for violations, including possible prison terms for criticizing the judiciary, threaten to entrench more self-censorship in Singapore's constrained media environment.

August 5, 2016 1:59 PM ET

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Blog   |   Philippines

Philippine leader blows hot and cold on press freedom

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, center, speaks with journalists in June. The new leader has given mixed messages on press freedom. (AFP/Manman Dejeto)

Newly installed Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has sent mixed messages on his commitment to upholding press freedom and combating impunity in media murders, a mix of hope and fear that has broadly defined the first months of his leadership. Uncertainty about Duterte's stance on the media's watchdog role comes against the backdrop of a "war on drugs" campaign that has resulted in the killing by police and vigilante groups of hundreds of drug suspects.

Blog   |   China

China shuts down internet reporting as Xi's sensitivity begins to resemble lèse-majesté

A Chinese security officer holds the media rope as U.S. National Security Adviser Susan Rice, background left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, are seated for photographers at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on July 25, 2016. Xi's increasing intolerance of negative coverage has approached a kind of lèse-majesté. (AP/How Hwee Young)

On July 1, popular internet portal Tencent, in its original news reporting section, published an article on a speech that President Xi Jinping gave the same day at a conference celebrating the 95th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party. One line of the article read, "Xi Jinping outburst an important speech." To any reader who speaks Chinese, the sentence clearly included a typo and its meaning was, "Xi Jinping delivered an important speech."

Case   |   India

Lawyers assault journalists covering trial

On July 20, 2016, a group of lawyers chased and beat journalists gathered at a court complex in the southern Indian state of Kerala, injuring three people, according to The Indian Express and other Indian newspapers.

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