Venezuela

Venezuela uses range of repressive tactics


The independent daily newspaper El Carabobeño, one of the last remaining independent voices in Valencia, the capital of Carabobo state, publishes its last print edition after it could not purchase newsprint from the state monopoly. A court sentences David Natera Febres, editor of the newspaper Correo del Caroní, to four years in prison on defamation charges for his paper's reporting on corruption. The newspaper El Nacional, one of the last critical newspapers left in Caracas, struggles to continue reporting.

Globovisión defiant after elections
Criminal defamation in the Americas
AP/Alejandro Cegarra

Blog   |   Venezuela

After Venezuelan elections, Globovisión shows more defiant stance

The control room of Venezuelan station Globovisión. Since congressional elections in December, the news outlet has taken a tougher stance in its coverage. (AFP/Miguel Gutierrez)

When Venezuela's opposition broke the ruling party's 17-year stranglehold on power by winning control of congress in December, the political earthquake created editorial aftershocks at the 24-hour news station Globovisión.

Alerts   |   Venezuela

Venezuelan government newsprint squeeze forces newspaper to stop printing

Bogotá, March 18, 2016 - Blaming the refusal of the government to sell it newsprint, the independent Venezuelan daily El Carabobeño printed its final edition on Thursday, according to news reports. The newspaper has published for 82 years and was one of the few independent media outlets in Valencia, the capital of Carabobo state.

March 18, 2016 11:19 AM ET

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Venezuelan editor sentenced to 4 years in prison for criminal defamation

Bogotá, Colombia, March 11, 2016--A Venezuelan judge today sentenced David Natera Febres, the editor of an independent newspaper that investigated corruption at a state-run mining company, to four years in prison for criminal defamation, according to news reports.

Blog   |   Venezuela

Last critic standing: How El Nacional defies challenges to keep publishing

Editor Miguel Henrique Otero, pictured in El Nacional's Caracas office in 2010, has been managing the paper from exile after being accused of defamation. (AP/Fernando Llano)

Patricia Spadaro, news editor at the Caracas daily El Nacional, faces daunting challenges in putting out the newspaper. Her boss, El Nacional's president and editor Miguel Henrique Otero, has been living in exile since May 2015 after a top government official accused him of defamation. Amid the country's deep economic crisis, half of Spadaro's reporters have been laid off and there is less space for articles due to a newsprint shortage. Staff must also sometimes skip work to stand in line at supermarkets to buy milk, meat, and other scarce products.

Blog   |   Venezuela

Venezuela's national assembly reopens to the press after five-year ban

Journalists gather in the press gallery of Venezuela's National Assembly, after a five-year ban was overturned. (AP/Fernando Llano)

When security guards opened the doors to Venezuela's colonial-era National Assembly building last Wednesday, I was among the dozens of reporters who swarmed inside. Even though the day's legislative session would not be called to order for another three hours, every seat in the press galley, located on the second-floor balcony overlooking the chamber, was quickly occupied.

Blog   |   Brazil, Cuba, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela

Inter-American Human Rights System, campaigns against defamation laws keep journalists from jail in Americas

When a prison guard told Ángel Santiesteban Prats that he would be released from jail on a scorching summer day in July, the Cuban independent writer and blogger decided to ignore him, brushing off the news as a cruel joke. By then, Santiesteban had already spent two years and five months in prison, half of his five-year sentence, on trumped-up charges of domestic abuse. But Santiesteban, who had been jailed in reprisal for the critical blog Los Hijos que Nadie Quiso (The Children Nobody Wanted), was unexpectedly paroled a few hours later.

Alerts   |   Venezuela

Regional court orders Venezuela to reinstate RCTV on the air

New York, September 8, 2015--A recent ruling by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights ordering Venezuela to reinstate the broadcasting license of Radio Caracas Television, or RCTV, sets an important precedent for freedom of expression in the hemisphere, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. RCTV has been confined to cable and satellite since being forced off the air in 2007.

September 8, 2015 4:35 PM ET

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Blog   |   Venezuela

In Venezuela, online news helps journalists get their voices back

After leaving Globovisión, Alberto Ravell, pictured in 2010, set up critical online news site La Patilla. (AFP/Miguel Gutierrez)

When Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez was rumored to be gravely ill four years ago, his socialist government was tightlipped about the diagnosis. Then in June 2011 a source in Havana, Cuba, where Chávez was being treated, told Nelson Bocaranda, a veteran columnist for the Caracas daily El Universal, that the president had cancer.

Reports   |   Bangladesh, Denmark, Ecuador, France, India, Iran, Malaysia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, USA, Venezuela

Drawing the line: Cartoonists under threat

On January 7, two gunmen burst into the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing eight journalists and bringing into focus the risks cartoonists face. But with the ability of their work to transcend borders and languages, and to simplify complex political situations, the threats faced by cartoonists around the world—who are being imprisoned, forced into hiding, threatened with legal action or killed—far exceed Islamic extremism. A Committee to Protect Journalists special report by Shawn W. Crispin

Alerts   |   Venezuela

Venezuelan court bars media executives from leaving country

Diosdado Cabello, president of Venezuela's National Assembly, at a rally in Caracas in February. A judge has imposed a travel ban on 22 news executives named in a defamation lawsuit Cabello is filing. (Reuters/Marco Bello)

Bogotá, May 15, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns a decision by a Venezuelan judge that prohibits 22 news executives from three independent media outlets from leaving the country due to a defamation lawsuit filed by one of Venezuela's most powerful politicians. According to news reports, the lawsuit and travel ban came after three outlets republished in January a story from the Spanish daily ABC that linked Diosdado Cabello, president of Venezuela's National Assembly, to drug trafficking.

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