East Timor / Asia

  

Attacks on the Press 2002: Asia Analysis

The vicious murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan focused international attention on the dangers faced by journalists covering the U.S. “war on terror,” yet most attacks on journalists in Asia happened far from the eyes of the international press. In countries such as Bangladesh and the Philippines, reporters covering crime and…

Read More ›

Attacks on the Press 2002: East Timor

A decades-long struggle for independence ended on May 20, when the U.N. Transitional Authority for East Timor (UNTAET) formally handed power to East Timor’s first elected government, making the tiny half-island state the first new nation of the millennium. A fledgling press has emerged from the destruction that followed the territory’s vote for independence from…

Read More ›

Attacks on the Press 2002: North Korea

Shortly after U.S. president George W. Bush arrived in South Korea’s capital, Seoul, in February 2002 for a state visit, the North Korean state news agency, KCNA, reported a miracle: that a cloud in the shape of a Kimjongilia, the flower named after the country’s leader, Kim Jong Il, had appeared over North Korea. “Even…

Read More ›

EAST TIMOR INDICTS TWO INDONESIAN MILITARY OFFICERS FOR MURDER OF DUTCH JOURNALIST

New York, November 7, 2002—The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) welcomes yesterday’s indictment in East Timor of two suspected murderers of Dutch journalist Sander Thoenes, who was killed in Dili on September 21, 1999, while he was reporting for The Financial Times and The Christian Science Monitor. Arrest warrants for both men, who are Indonesian…

Read More ›

Attacks on the Press 2001: East Timor

East Timor’s media faced their first real test under a democratic environment when they covered September’s United Nations-supervised poll electing a constituent assembly and a transitional government. The press performed admirably, with few cases of political harassment and most Timorese journalists attempting to be fair and balanced in their reporting.

Read More ›

Killers of Indonesian journalist convicted of “crimes against humanity”

New York, December 12, 2001—The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) welcomes yesterday’s announcement that the killers of journalist Agus Muliawan were among those convicted of “crimes against humanity” in connection with the violence that surrounded East Timor’s August 1999 vote for independence from Indonesia. The Special Panel for Serious Crimes of the District Court in…

Read More ›

Attacks on the Press 2000: Asia Analysis

DESPITE PRESS FREEDOM ADVANCES ACROSS ASIA IN RECENT YEARS, totalitarian regimes in Burma, China, North Korea, Vietnam, and Laos maintained their stranglehold on the media. Even democratic Asian governments sometimes used authoritarian tactics to control the press, particularly when faced with internal conflict. Sri Lanka, for instance, imposed harsh censorship regulations during the year in…

Read More ›

Justice Delayed

The UN and the Indonesian government both think they know who killed two journalists in East Timor last year. So why aren’t the suspects on trial?

Read More ›

CPJ Welcomes UN Investigation into 1975 Murders of Five Journalists in East Timor

New York, September 15, 2000–The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) welcomes today’s announcement that the United Nations is investigating the October, 1975 murders of five Australia-based journalists in East Timor. [Go to map of region] CPJ urges UN authorities to expand the investigation to include the murder of Australian free-lance journalist Roger East, said to…

Read More ›

Attacks on the Press 1999: Introduction

By Ann CooperAs a foreign correspondent covering the Soviet Union a decade ago, I was an eyewitness to a dramatic example of the press’ critical role in building democracy. Granted a bit of freedom by Mikhail Gorbachev’s mid-1980s glasnost policy, long-suppressed Soviet journalists set their own daring agenda: they probed forbidden history, investigated contemporary corruption,…

Read More ›