Privacy

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Statements   |   USA

CPJ urges Sessions to commit to journalist protection if confirmed as attorney general

Senator Jeff Sessions at his attorney general confirmation hearing on January 10. Sessions was asked if he would commit to not jailing journalists. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty/AFP)

New York, January 11, 2016--In remarks before the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for attorney general yesterday, U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions said he was unsure whether he would commit to following guidelines adopted by Attorney General Eric Holder in 2015 that make it harder, though not impossible, for the Department of Justice to subpoena journalists' records.

January 11, 2017 5:31 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Thailand

Thai legislation threatens online freedoms

A website displays a message from the Thai Ministry of Digital Economy and Society reading, "This website contains content and information that is deemed inappropriate. It has been censored by the Ministry of Digital Economy and Society," November 17, 2016. (AP)

Bangkok, December 16, 2016--Thailand's cabinet and king should scrap legislation that would give authorities sweeping new powers to censor the internet based on vague and broad criteria, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The military-appointed National Legislative Assembly today passed amendments to the 2007 Computer Crime Act that would severely restrict Thais' rights to privacy and to freely impart and receive information.

December 16, 2016 1:04 PM ET

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Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: First Amendment attorney Floyd Abrams on Trump's power over libel laws

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

President-elect Donald Trump meets with President Barack Obama in November as the new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S. (AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Safety Advisories

CPJ Safety Advisory: Crossing the US border

Travelers are reflected in glass as they line up for security at the international airport in Atlanta, Georgia, March 10, 2016. (AP/David Goldman)


Journalists traveling to or from the United States have been stopped, questioned and faced prolonged and invasive searches that have put the confidentiality of their sources into question. Over the past year, members of the A Culture of Safety
(ACOS) Alliance, a coalition of news organizations, journalists, and press freedom groups that includes the Committee to Protect Journalists and Reporters Without Borders, have documented at least seven such instances. In response to these incidents, CPJ's Emergencies Response Team has issued the following advisory for journalists crossing the U.S. border.

December 9, 2016 4:02 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

In Hong Kong law, privacy may trump public interest

Demonstrators fill Hong Kong's financial district. (Reuters/Bobby Yip)

Tens of thousands of residents demonstrated on the streets of Hong Kong on Monday, the 16th anniversary of the city's return to Chinese rule. The protests have become an annual rite, but the demonstrators' demands were quite specific this year. They wanted the resignation of Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying and they called for direct elections. These demonstrators look around and see eroding freedoms and what one commentator, Emily Lau, called "a rule of law in a precarious state." Journalists are uneasy as well. Vague and potentially onerous aspects of recently passed privacy legislation could put them at risk of harsh punishment.

July 2, 2013 3:43 PM ET

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6 results