Jan-Albert Hootsen/CPJ Mexico Representative

Jan-Albert Hootsen, CPJ's Mexico correspondent for the Americas program, works as a correspondent for Dutch newspaper Trouw, and regularly contributes to publications including Newsweek and RTL Nieuws. He is based in Mexico City.

Griselda Triana, the wife of slain journalist Javier Valdez, attends his memorial service at a funeral parlor in Culiacan, In Sinaloa state, Mexico, on May 16, 2017. Triana wrote a letter calling for justice in his case on May 15, 2020, the third anniversary of his murder. (Reuters/Jesus Bustamante)

On third anniversary of his murder, Javier Valdez’s wife calls for justice in open letter

Today, on the third anniversary of the murder of her husband, Mexican reporter Javier Valdez Cárdenas, journalist Griselda Triana wrote an open letter calling for justice and describing the ordeal of her family in the wake of his killing. The letter was published in several Mexican news outlets and by the Committee to Protect Journalists.

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A journalist is seen in Mexico City on April 8, 2020. Mexican journalists recently told CPJ that a lack of equipment and government obstruction are among their bigget concerns while covering the COVID-19 pandemic. (AFP/Pedro Pardo)

In Mexico, reporters covering COVID-19 face equipment shortages and government obstruction

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic struck Mexico, the country was already one of the most dangerous in the world for journalists, according to CPJ research.

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Graffiti shows the likeness of murdered photojournalist Rubén Espinosa and the eyes and names of the other four victims, on the wall of Mexico City attorney general's headquarters in Mexico City, in July 2016. Deadly violence against journalists is rare in the capital, but reporters covering organized crime in the city say threats are on the rise. (AP/Marco Ugarte)

Threats draw near, damaging Mexico City’s reputation as safe haven for reporters

Emir Olivares was almost too stunned to speak when, on December 6, he found two men in the bedroom of his apartment in Mexico City.

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Flowers and crosses bear the names of journalists and human rights defenders murdered in the first three months since President Andrés Manuel López Obrador took office, in Mexico City in February 2019. At least two of the journalists murdered for their work in 2019 were enrolled in a safety protection mechanism. (AP/Rebecca Blackwell)

When it comes to protecting journalists, Mexico’s safety mechanism comes up short

Gildo Garza sighs when he speaks of the institution that is supposed to protect him. “I feel disappointed, depressed, desperate, and alone,” he said. “I no longer have any hope in a system that was supposed to help me build up a new life or get my old life back.”

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Cameras and a photo of Miroslava Breach are laid out as part of a tribute to the journalist on the second anniversary of her murder. Mexico's investigation into her killing is flawed, a report on the journalist has found. (AFP/Herika Martinez)

‘Project Miroslava’ finds flaws in Mexico’s investigation of journalist murder

An in-depth investigation into the March 23, 2017 killing of Mexican journalist Miroslava Breach Velducea found grave omissions, flaws and irregularities in authorities’ investigation of the murder.

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Patricia Espinosa, the sister of Rubén Espinosa, a photographer murdered in 2015, and Alejandro Encinas, undersecretary for human rights, population, and migration, speak at CPJ's press freedom summit. (Ian Garciafigueroa)

Press freedom summit urges Mexico to reform journalist protections

On June 18, more than 400 people converged in Mexico City for CPJ’s Mexico Press Freedom Summit. Energized by a sense that the country is at a point of profound political change under the government of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, the conference delved into the threats for Mexican journalists.

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A vendor sells newspapers showing the results of Mexico's presidential elections, in Mexico City, in July 2018. Mexico's new government has said it will address the opaque practice of government advertising in media. (AFP/Ulises Ruiz)

Mexico’s press question president’s commitment to press advertising reform

When Andrés Manuel López Obrador won Mexico’s presidential elections last year with a promise to drastically cut the millions of dollars the government spends on press advertising each year, it appeared to signal the end to an opaque system that has been criticized as a way for governments to encourage favorable coverage.

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President Andrés Manuel López Obrador arrives for his daily press briefing at the National Palace in Mexico City, on April 12. Journalists in Mexico say they are harassed online after being criticized by the president. (AP/Marco Ugarte)

López Obrador’s anti-press rhetoric leaves Mexico’s journalists feeling exposed

During his daily press conference on April 15, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador told reporters, “If you go too far, you know what will happen.” López Obrador clarified his remarks the following day, saying he meant that the public would hold reporters who unfairly criticize the government to account. But in a country where…

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Journalists light candles to mark the first anniversary of the murder of Mexican journalist Miroslava Breach, in March. Crime and politics are dangerous beats for Mexico's journalists. (Reuters/Jose Luis Gonzalez)

In Mexico, ‘narcopolitics’ is a deadly mix for journalists covering crime and politics

It was 3 p.m. on January 13 when Carlos Domínguez Rodríguez stopped at a traffic light in Nuevo Laredo, in the northern Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Two men approached the car of the well-known newspaper columnist, opened the driver’s door, and stabbed him more than 20 times in front of his family.

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A mural in Monterrey of murdered Mexican journalist Javier Valdez Cárdenas. Mexico is the most deadly country in the Western hemisphere for journalists. (AFP/Julio Aguilar)

Mexico’s special prosecutor says FEADLE is improving, but impunity continues

For approximately two months, Mexico’s office of the Special Prosecutor for Attention for Crimes Against Freedom of Expression (FEADLE) led a nomadic existence after its building was damaged in a September 19 earthquake that killed almost 400 people in and around Mexico City. The agency now has a new home, but the natural disaster served…

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