Nicaragua / Americas

Journalists attacked in Nicaragua since 1992

  
A protester holds a national flag during a demonstration against President Daniel Ortega's government in Managua, Nicaragua, on February 25, 2020. YouTube has censored independent Nicaraguan news outlets after copyright complaints from Ortega-owned media. (Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas)

YouTube censors independent Nicaraguan news outlets after copyright complaints from Ortega-owned media

Miguel Mora, director of the independent Nicaraguan news outlet 100% Noticias, oversaw its move online after its television broadcast license was revoked by the government in April 2018. He and his colleagues transferred their archives onto two YouTube accounts and used them to continue documenting the government’s repressive response to escalating protests in the months…

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A homeless man wears a face mask against the spread of COVID-19 as he walks past a mural depicting Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, in Managua on April 9, 2020. Journalist Álvaro Navarro recently described to CPJ his experiences covering the pandemic in Nicaragua. (AFP/Inti Ocon)

Álvaro Navarro on covering COVID-19 in Nicaragua, Central America’s center of virus denial

Over the last two years–since protests and a government crackdown began in April 2018—Nicaraguan journalist Álvaro Navarro and his outlet, news website Artículo 66, have been a vital source of information for people looking for alternatives to the government’s discourse. During the COVID-19 pandemic, he and his team have been on the frontlines, reporting on…

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A protester displays a Nicaraguan flag in Managua on March 16, 2019. Journalists covering anti-government protests across the country were attacked, harassed, and in some cases, detained. (AFP/Maynor Valenzuela)

Nicaragua: A crackdown in four parts

When protests erupted in Nicaragua in April last year, it was clear from the beginning that the country’s media landscape would be a battleground. One day into the unrest, the government ordered cable providers to cut the signals of at least five TV channels. By the end of the year, CPJ had documented attacks, arrests,…

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Verónica Chávez, Miguel Mora, and Lucia Pineda, after Mora and Pineda's release from prison June 11, in Managua, Nicaragua. (CPJ)

Locked in ‘small graves’: Nicaraguan journalists Mora and Pineda describe their ordeal

Miguel Mora and Lucía Pineda were arrested on December 21, 2018, in the Managua newsroom of 100% Noticias and spent 172 days in prison facing charges of “inciting violence and hate” and “promoting terrorism.” The two journalists spoke to CPJ after their June 11 release. They will receive CPJ’s 2019 International Press Freedom Award in…

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The 100% Noticias building is seen in Managua on December 22, 2018, one day after it was raided and closed by the Nicaraguan police. Two journalists from the broadcaster remain in detention. (Maynor Valenzuela/AFP)

CPJ, RSF call on Nicaragua to release two journalists held on terrorism charges

The Committee to Protect Journalists and Reporters Without Borders today condemned the detention of two independent journalists in Nicaragua, and called on Nicaraguan authorities to immediately release them and drop all charges against them.

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At a national dialogue with President Daniel Ortega in May 2018, a woman holds up a newspaper showing images of people who died in protests in Nicaragua. More media outlets are providing hard-hitting news about the violent crackdown. (AP/Alfredo Zuniga)

In Nicaragua, Ortega’s control over the media slips even as a government crackdown intensifies

Nicaragua’s four-month-old popular uprising has not only weakened President Daniel Ortega’s grip on power: it has eroded his government’s control over the news.

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Protests in Managua. Journalists in Nicaragua say they have been beaten, attacked, and had equipment stolen during months of protests against President Daniel Ortega. (Shannon O'Reilly)

Nicaragua’s press defiant in the face of arson attacks and mob violence

At the temporary office of Radio Darío in the Nicaraguan city of León, reporters have set up two emergency escape routes: a trap door that opens into the dining room of the house next door and a ladder leading to the roof.

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Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega with his wife, Rosario Murillo, at a memorial for Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez in 2014. Independent journalists say Murillo controls press access to Ortega. (Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas)

Long silence from Nicaragua’s president as first lady keeps press at arm’s length

It’s been nearly 3,000 days since Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega last held a news conference, according to the opposition newspaper La Prensa. But when journalists complain about the lack of access to Ortega they often direct their ire not at the president but at the first lady, Rosario Murillo.

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HKND Group chairman Wang Jing celebrates the start of work on Nicaragua's interoceanic waterway in December. Reporters say little information has been released on the $50 billion project. (AFP/STR)

Reporters covering Nicaragua waterway project obstructed by lack of information

When Nicaragua began preliminary work on an interoceanic waterway designed to handle ships too big for the Panama Canal, some of the foreign correspondents who had flown in to cover the December groundbreaking were left high and dry.

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The media strategy of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, shown after casting his ballot in Sunday's election, is to ignore journalists. (AP)

Secretive Ortega frustrates Nicaraguan press

It used to be that covering the Nicaraguan presidency was a coveted job for reporters. Now, it’s a frustrating exercise that borders on stenography.

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