Oromia Media Network

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CPJ condemns Ethiopian internet shutdown and Oromia Media Network raid

Nairobi, June 30, 2020 – In response to a nationwide internet shutdown in Ethiopia and a police raid on the Oromia Media Network, the Committee to Protect Journalists issued the following statement: “Ethiopian authorities’ persistence of old patterns of censorship in response to crises, when the public most needs access to timely news and information,…

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Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed speaks during a press conference in Addis Ababa, in August 2018. Since Abiy's election, conditions for Ethiopia's journalists have improved, but some challenges remain. (AFP/Michael Tewelde)

Under Abiy, Ethiopia’s media have more freedom but challenges remain

During a trip to Addis Ababa in January, it was impossible to miss the signs that Ethiopian media are enjoying unprecedented freedom. A flurry of new publications were on the streets. At a public forum that CPJ attended, journalists spoke about positive reforms, but also openly criticized their lack of access to the government. At…

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed arrives for a rally in the Oromia region in April, 2018. His government has allowed access to hundreds of websites that had been blocked in the country. (Reuters/Tiksa Negeri)

Ethiopia allows access to over 260 blocked websites

New York, June 22, 2018–The Committee to Protect Journalists today welcomed the Ethiopian government’s decision to allow access to 264 websites, including news outlets and blogs, that were blocked in the country. In a tweet today, Fitsum Arega, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s chief of staff, said that the sites included the diaspora outlets Oromia Media…

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The skyline of Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, in January 2017. Press freedom conditions remain stark, with journalists jailed or facing legal action, internet shutdowns, and reports of surveillance. (Reuters/Tiksa Negeri)

Why release of two journalists in Ethiopia does not signal end to press crackdown

On January 10, radio journalists Darsema Sori and Khalid Mohammed were released from prison after serving lengthy sentences related to their work at the Ethiopian faith-based station Radio Bilal. Despite their release and Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn’s promise earlier this month to free political prisoners, Ethiopia’s use of imprisonment, harassment, and surveillance means that the…

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