Al-Arabiya

104 results arranged by date

Attacks on the Press 2004: Egypt

Egypt For the first time in years, Egyptian journalists are cautiously optimistic about prospects for press freedom. President Hosni Mubarak, whose record on press issues has been spotty since he took power in 1981, proposed decriminalizing press offenses as public debate about political reforms gained steam. Journalists, for their part, showed greater willingness to take…

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Attacks on the Press 2004: Iraq

IraqFor the second consecutive year, Iraq was the most dangerous place in the world to work as a journalist, and the conflict there remained one of the most deadly in recent history for the media. Twenty-three journalists were killed in action in 2004, along with 16 media workers.

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Attacks on the Press 2004: Israel and the Palestinian Authority Territories

Israel and the Occupied Territories, including the Palestinian Authority TerritoriesWith Iraq dominating media security concerns in the Middle East, journalists covering the region’s other main flash point quietly faced a familiar array of hazards on the job. The occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip remained two of the most dangerous and unpredictable assignments for journalists…

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Attacks on the Press 2004: Saudi Arabia

Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabia’s press is among the most heavily censored in the Arab world, but it has shown occasional signs of life since September 11, 2001. Some Saudi newspapers have demonstrated unusual boldness, publishing tough critiques of religious militancy and low-level government mismanagement and calling for reform.

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Attacks on the Press 2004: Sudan

Sudan Sudan garnered international headlines in 2004 due to widespread atrocities and ethnic cleansing in Darfur, an impoverished region in the west of the country. Since February 2003, government-backed militias, known as janjaweed, have killed tens of thousands of people and displaced close to 2 million in a counterinsurgency campaign against rebel groups.

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Attacks on the Press 2004: Yemen

YemenYemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh said in May that he would work to decriminalize press offenses. Yet three months later, a prominent editor who published opinion pieces opposing the president’s handling of a bloody armed rebellion was sentenced to a year in prison, and his newspaper was suspended for six months.

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CNN’s Jordan is gone, but questions remain over U.S. security record in Iraq

Committee to Protect Journalists  This article appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on February 22, 2005 Posted: February 17, 2005 The media was abuzz over comments attributed to CNN news executive Eason Jordan that some of the several dozen journalists killed in Iraq were deliberately targeted by U.S. forces. Pundits, bloggers, columnists, and members of Congress…

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Al-Arabiya correspondent arrested after news report

New York, January 6, 2005—The Committee to Protect Journalists strongly protests the arrest of a correspondent for news channel Al-Arabiya in Kuwait yesterday, shortly after the station aired a disputed report of clashes between Kuwaiti government forces and militants. Correspondent Adil Aidan remained in custody today after his arrest by Kuwaiti authorities, according to Al-Arabiya…

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KUWAIT

JANUARY 5, 2005 Posted: January 19, 2005 Adil Aidan, Al-Arabiya HARASSED, IMPRISONED Aidan, a correspondent for news channel Al-Arabiya, was arrested after the station aired a disputed report of clashes between Kuwaiti government forces and militants.

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Journalist detained in Fallujah by U.S. troops

New York, November 17, 2004—A freelance journalist working for The Associated Press and the Arabic-language, Dubai-based satellite channel Al-Arabiya has been detained by U.S. troops in Fallujah since November 11, according to staff at Al-Arabiya. Najwa Kassem, a correspondent for Al-Arabiya, told CPJ that the station lost contact with Abdel Kader Saadi, a reporter and…

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