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Tunisia

Reports   |   Tunisia

In Tunisia, press freedom erodes amid security fears

Hard-earned press freedom in Tunisia is under threat as journalists are squeezed between violent extremists and security services sensitive to criticism in the wake of deadly terror attacks. While Islamist militants threaten the media, the government introduces restrictive legislation and security forces legally harass and even assault journalists. In this climate, which is further restricted by regulatory disputes, some news outlets resort to self-censorship. A CPJ special report by Safa Ben Said

A journalist holds up a television frame during a protest in 2012. Tunisian news outlets have come under pressure in 2015. (Reuters/Anis Mili)

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Somalia, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, Vietnam, Yemen

For journalists, coverage of political unrest proves deadly

Journalists die at high rates while covering protests in the Arab world and elsewhere. Photographers and freelancers appear vulnerable. Pakistan is again the deadliest nation. A CPJ special report

In Egypt, protesters demanding democratic change gather in Tahrir Square. (AFP)

Reports   |   Belarus, China, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Myanmar, Russia, Syria, Tunisia

The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors

The world’s worst online oppressors are using an array of tactics, some reflecting astonishing levels of sophistication, others reminiscent of old-school techniques. From China’s high-level malware attacks to Syria’s brute-force imprisonments, this may be only the dawn of online oppression. A CPJ special report by Danny O’Brien

A security line outside Google's Beijing office. (AP/Andy Wong)

Reports   |   Belarus, China, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Multimedia, Myanmar, Russia, Syria, Tunisia

Audio Report: The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors




In our special report, "The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors," CPJ examines the 10 prevailing strategies of online oppression worldwide and the countries that have taken the lead in their use. In this accompanying podcast, CPJ Deputy Director Robert Mahoney notes that these strategies range from sophisticated cyber-attacks to traditional brute-force techniques. Listen to the podcast on the player above, or right click here to download an MP3. (2:47)

Read CPJ's special report, "The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors."

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Yemen

Iran, China drive prison tally to 14-year high

Relying heavily on vague antistate charges, authorities jail 145 journalists worldwide. Eritrea, Burma, and Uzbekistan are also among the worst jailers of the press. A CPJ special report

From Africa to the Americas, more journalists are imprisoned today than at any time since 1996. (AFP)

Reports   |   Azerbaijan, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, India, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Myanmar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, USA, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen

CPJ's 2009 prison census: Freelance journalists under fire

Demonstrators demand the release of documentary filmmaker Dhondup Wangchen, jailed in China after interviewing Tibetans. (AFP)

New York, December 8, 2009—Freelancers now make up nearly 45 percent of all journalists jailed worldwide, a dramatic recent increase that reflects the evolution of the global news business, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. In its annual census of imprisoned journalists, CPJ found a total of 136 reporters, editors, and photojournalists behind bars on December 1, an increase of 11 from the 2008 tally. (Read detailed accounts of each imprisoned journalist.) A massive crackdown in Iran, where 23 journalists are now in jail, fueled the worldwide increase.

Reports   |   Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen

Middle East Bloggers: The Street Leads Online

In the Middle East and North Africa, where political change occurs slowly, blogging has becomes a serious medium for social and political commentary as well as a target of government suppression. By Mohamed Abdel Dayem

                        

Reports   |   Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Morocco, Multimedia, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE

Audio Report: Middle East Bloggers





In our special report “Middle East Bloggers: The Street Leads Online,” CPJ’s Mohamed Abdel Dayem says blogging has become a crucial front in the region's struggle for freedom of expression. Here, Abdel Dayem describes how two regional trends--booming Internet audiences and repression of traditional media--have made blogging a vibrant news alternative. Listen to the mp3 on the player above, or right click here to download. (2:05)  
October 13, 2009 11:54 AM ET

Reports   |   China, Cuba, Egypt, Iran, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Vietnam

10 Worst Countries to be a Blogger

CPJ names the worst online oppressors. Booming online cultures in many Asian and Middle Eastern nations have led to aggressive government repression. Burma leads the dishonor roll.

Reports   |   China, Cuba, Egypt, Iran, Multimedia, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Vietnam

Audio Report: Worst Countries to be a Blogger




In our special report, “10 Worst Countries to be a Blogger,” CPJ names the world’s leading online oppressors. Here, Deputy Director Robert Mahoney explains why CPJ undertook this report and how it arrived at its conclusions. Listen to the mp3 on the player above, or right click here to download. (5:34)  
April 30, 2009 12:01 AM ET

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