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Blog   |   Mexico

In Mexico, covering state elections brings risk of threats and violence

Miguel Angel Mancera, the mayor of Mexico City, casts his vote on June 5. Journalists were threatened and harassed in the lead up to state elections. (Reuters/Edgard Garrido)

As the June 5 elections approached, the anonymous phone calls to Mexican journalist Pedro Canché became more frequent and more ominous. "The Caribbean is a big sea, you'll never be found," one said. "I hope you've written a will," said another. A third caller told Canché, "Remember what happened to Rubén Espinosa," referring to the photographer murdered in Mexico City on July 31 last year. "Do you want that to happen to you too?"

Blog   |   Mexico

Why the governor of Veracruz should resign

Men carry the casket of murdered photojournalist Ruben Espinosa in Mexico City on August 3, 2015. (AP/Marco Ugarte)

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was originally published, in Spanish, on Univision.com.

The state of Veracruz has become one of the world's most lethal regions for the press. According to research by the Committee to Protect Journalists, when you include the case of Anabel Flores Salazar, whose body was found on Tuesday, at least 12 journalists have been murdered in Veracruz since Javier Duarte de Ochoa become governor in 2010. Three more have disappeared, their whereabouts unknown. Other free expression groups, using different criteria, have documented higher numbers.

Blog   |   Mexico

'Pedro Canché Law' obscures the real problem in Quintana Roo

Roberto Borge, governor of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo, says a new law is meant to protect journalists, but they say it is a joke. (AP/Israel Leal)

Mayan journalist Pedro Canché spent 271 days in prison on charges of sabotage. Authorities alleged Canché organized protests one year ago against rising water bills in the Zona Maya south of Cancún, in Quintana Roo state, where demonstrators stormed the offices of the local waterworks, CPJ research shows.

September 1, 2015 2:00 PM ET

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Blog   |   Mexico

The murder of Mexican photographer Espinosa has touched a nerve

A protester holds up a photograph of Rubén Espinosa, a journalist who was killed after he fled Veracruz state. Hundreds of journalists, writers, and artists have signed on to a letter calling on the Mexican government to end the cycle of violence in Mexico. (Reuters/Henry Romero)

The July 31 murder of Mexican photographer Rubén Espinosa hit the press freedom community really hard. Espinosa, who was found in an apartment with four female victims--all of them shot in the head--had fled the state of Veracruz in June and sought refuge in Mexico City, where he thought he would be safe from threats and intimidation.

Blog   |   Mexico

In Mexico, reporters struggle to cover unrest over missing students

Graffiti referring to 43 students who went missing last September is spray painted on a wall in Mexico City as part of protests about their disappearance. Some journalists say they have struggled to cover the case. (Reuters/Tomas Bravo)

Veteran reporter Sergio Ocampo was having a late dinner on September 26 when his editor called about a shooting in the city of Iguala in Guerrero state. Students from the Ayotzinapa teacher training college were apparently among the victims. But when Ocampo, a correspondent for the newspaper La Jornada, called the then-mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, he was told, "Nothing happened." The mayor added, "They came from Ayotzinapa to do their destruction here," Ocampo recalled.

Blog   |   Mexico

Investigative journalist Carmen Aristegui fired from Mexican radio station

Carmen Aristegui speaks to the press outside MVS Radio in Mexico City on March 16. The investigative journalist was dismissed after demanding that the station reinstate two reporters it fired last week. (AFP/Ronaldo Schemidt)

She exposed government corruption with investigative reporting that made international headlines, helped launch the Mexicoleaks whistleblower website, and was voted second most powerful woman in the country last year by Forbes Mexico, but Carmen Aristegui, one of the country's most popular radio journalists, has been fired from MVS Radio after demanding that the privately owned station reinstate two investigative reporters.

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Slideshow: Journalists killed in 2014

In 2014, at least 60 journalists and 11 media workers were killed in relation to their work, according to CPJ research. Local and international journalists died covering conflicts, including in Syria, Iraq, and Ukraine, while many others were murdered reporting on corruption and organized crime in their own countries.

Here, CPJ remembers some of the journalists who gave their lives to bring us this year's headlines.

Blog   |   Mexico

In Reynosa, Mexico, suspected murder of social media user spreads fear

On October 16, photographs of a woman were posted on the Twitter account @Miut3 with an ominous message. "My life has come to an end today. Don't put your families at risk like I did," the tweet read. "I'm sorry. I died for nothing. They are closer on our trail than you think."

October 23, 2014 6:06 PM ET

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Blog   |   Mexico

Governor 'cloned' Cancún magazine to create fake covers with positive stories

The original headline of Luces del Siglo, left, reads Crime Gaining Ground but the headline of the fake cover, right, reads No Truce With Crime. (Articulo 19)

The Cancún-based investigative magazine Luces del Siglo has won a court decision ordering the Quintana Roo state government to stop "cloning" the covers of its weekly editions and spreading the fake versions via social networks, according to news reports.

September 25, 2014 11:00 AM ET

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Blog   |   Mexico

Open government is unsustainable without a free press

This week, as he takes office as lead chair of the Open Government Partnership, Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto will reaffirm the commitment of the more than 60 countries that make up this multilateral initiative, which seeks to enhance governance, promote citizen participation, and improve governments' accountability to citizens.

September 23, 2014 5:03 PM ET

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