Go »
  Go »

Sudan


Violence, prison force journalists to flee

Reuters
CPJ helped 55 journalists go into exile in the past year, fleeing deadly places like Somalia and Syria and the threat of imprisonment in repressive countries such as Iran, its annual survey finds. Exiles leave behind careers, family, and livelihood to escape intimidation.
Data: 2012-13 | Since 2008
Español | Français | العربية | فارسی
CPJ Blog entries | Audio reports

New York, March 6, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists today welcomed recent decisions by the Sudanese judiciary supporting press freedom and called on the government to stop confiscating independent newspapers. 

Sudanese authorities on February 4, 2014, confiscated the editions of three independent daily newspapers from the printing press, according to news reports and local press freedom groups.

Despite official promises to end the practice of pre-publication censorship, agents of the Sudanese National Intelligence and Security Services continued to intimidate journalists and censor newspapers. Security service officials routinely ordered papers to be suspended and raided printing houses to confiscate certain issues. At least 14 journalists were arrested over the year, many for their coverage of anti-government protests prompted by economic austerity plans that swept the country in September. After the wave of protests, in which more than 700 citizens were arrested, the Sudanese government ordered editors to publish news in line with official statements and to portray protesters as “vandals.” Foreign media outlets were also targeted and told that their licenses would be scrapped, according to reports. The Sudanese government shut down Internet service twice to prevent protesters from using social media.

New York, October 1, 2013--Amid violent protests in Sudan last week, authorities asked journalists to refrain from publishing news that they said would "disturb the public," according to news reports. Several journalists were subsequently detained and multiple outlets shut down, news reports said.

New York, September 25, 2013--The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by reports that Internet service in Sudan was shut down today in what seemed like an official attempt to stifle coverage of violent protests after the government lifted fuel subsidies on Monday.

New York, July 17, 2013--A Bloomberg correspondent working in Sudan has reported being threatened and assaulted after being detained arbitrarily by authorities in late June. Michael Gunn told CPJ that he fled the country on July 2 fearing for his life.

Somalis, Syrians flee violence; Iran crackdown deepens

Fifty-five journalists fled their homes in the past year with help from the Committee to Protect Journalists. The most common reason to go into exile was the threat of violence, such as in Somalia and Syria, two of the most deadly countries in the world for the profession. Others fled the threat of prison, especially in Iran, where the government deepened its crackdown ahead of elections. A CPJ special report by Nicole Schilit

Syrians take shelter at a refugee camp near the border with Turkey. (Reuters/Muhammad Najdet Qadour/Shaam News Network)

New York, June 18, 2013--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the official harassment of Sudanese reporter Khalid Ahmed who was detained for three days this month and then interrogated three times since on broad allegations that he "harmed the morale of the armed forces" and denigrated its leaders.

A Sudanese man reads Al-Intibaha, a prominent daily that has been banned by the NISS. (AFP/Ashraf Shazly)

New York, June 6, 2013--Sudanese authorities have banned the publication of at least three newspapers in the past two weeks despite statements by government officials to curtail censorship practices, according to news reports.

Your Excellency: The Committee to Protect Journalists, an independent, nonprofit organization that promotes press freedom worldwide, is disturbed by the ongoing campaign by the Sudanese National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) to intimidate journalists and interfere in their work, including by censoring newspapers. In particular we are concerned for the safety of the Khartoum bureau chief for international news network Al-Jazeera, Almassllmani Al-Kabashi, who has been repeatedly harassed by NISS.

  Go »
Text Size
A   A   A
Killed in Sudan

1 journalist killed since 1992

1 journalist murdered

1 murdered with impunity

Attacks on the Press 2012

27 Attacks on journalists during height of popular unrest in June and July.

Country data, analysis »

Contact

Middle East
and North Africa

Program Coordinator:
Sherif Mansour

Research Associate:
Jason Stern

smansour@cpj.org
jstern@cpj.org

Tel: +1 (212) 300-9018,
+1 (212) 300-9017
Fax: 212-465-9568

330 7th Avenue, 11th Floor
New York, NY, 10001 USA

Twitter: @CPJMena

فيسبوك : لجنة حماية الصحفيين بالعربية

Blog: Sherif Mansour
Blog: Jason Stern

Subscribe

Sudan Atom Feed