Africa

2009

Alerts   |   Somalia

Explosion kills three Somali journalists in Mogadishu

Mohamed Amin (NUSOJ)

New York, December 3, 2009—Three journalists were among the victims of a suicide bombing at a Benadir University graduation ceremony in Mogadishu today. At least 22 people were killed at Hotel Shamo, including three government ministers, by suspected Islamic insurgents, according to The Associated Press.

Hassan Zubeyr, a cameraman for the Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya television network and Radio Shabelle reporter Mohamed Amin were killed instantly in the explosion, local journalists told CPJ. Abdulkhafar Abdulkadir, who recently took up freelance photography part-time, died of injuries in the hospital, according to local journalists. CPJ was unable to determine immediately if Abdulkadir was on assignment for a specific outlet.

Statements   |   Somalia

Kidnapped journalists are freed in Somalia

We issued the following statement after confirming the release today of Canadian freelance reporter Amanda Lindhout and Australian photojournalist Nigel Brennan, both held in Somalia since August 2008...

November 25, 2009 2:41 PM ET

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Blog   |   Azerbaijan, CPJ, China, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Tunisia

Seen and heard at CPJ benefit: 'The pen is not broken'

Small in stature but strong in her words, Naziha Réjiba tells a reporter of all the things the Tunisian government does to try to frighten her. But Réjiba said that she will not be scared, that she will never allow such tactics to have power over her. Editor of Kalima, an online news Web site blocked in her own country, Réjiba was honored Tuesday at CPJ’s International Press Freedom Awards at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria for displaying just that sort of courage. Four other leading journalists were recognized as well. 

Blog   |   Democratic Republic of the Congo

Didace Namujimbo, the brother I lost in Bukavu

Didace Namujimbo, right, with colleague Serge Maheshe at Radio Okapi offices in 2006. Both were later murdered. (Déo Namujimbo)

I shall never forgive myself for having initiated and encouraged my younger brother, Didace Namujimbo, to take up journalism. Working for 21 years in Bukavu, a city nestled on the picturesque shores of Lake Kivu, led me to cover every aspect of the brutal conflict and humanitarian catastrophe in this part of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, but a year ago nothing prepared me to deal with the news that my brother had been killed.

November 20, 2009 5:14 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Azerbaijan, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Tunisia

Honored for their work, threatened at home

CPJ introduces 2009 International Press Freedom Awardees


Naziha Réjiba (CPJ/Jeremy Bigwood) Washington, November 19, 2009Naziha Réjiba, editor of the Tunisian online news journal Kalima, said she knows what to expect when she returns home—surveillance, harassment, and threats conducted by one the world’s most repressive governments.

Alerts   |   Somalia

Two Somali journalists injured in separate shootings

New York, November 18, 2009—Two Somali correspondents for international media outlets were injured in separate shootings, one in the northeast semi-autonomous region of Puntland, and the other in the capital, Mogadishu, according to local journalists and news reports.
November 18, 2009 3:37 PM ET

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Impact   |   Afghanistan, Russia, Rwanda, USA

CPJ Impact

November 2009

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists

Blog   |   Zambia

Zambian editor acquitted in hospital 'obscenity' case

Chansa Kabwela speaks to reporters. (Thomas Nsama)

As the news editor of Zambia’s largest circulation newspaper and a mother to two young children, Chansa Kabwela already has her hands full. For the last four months, however, this 29-year-old journalist was mired in a court case with a peculiarity that made international headlines and sparked a debate on press freedom in this landlocked nation in southern Africa. The case was finally resolved on Monday.

November 17, 2009 5:10 PM ET

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Blog   |   Malawi

The Malawian who harnessed the airwaves

Villagers gather at Kondesi's radio station. (Zodiak Broadcasting)

After The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, the autobiography of ingenious 22-year-old William Kamkwamba’s homemade electric windmill in Malawi, comes “the boy who harnessed the airwaves” by building a radio station with rudimentary materials. The tale of 21-year-old Malawian Gabriel Kondesi also showcases the inventiveness spawned by life in this impoverished, landlocked nation in southeastern Africa. Unlike the story of Kamkwamba, though, Kondesi’s tale is still unfolding.

November 16, 2009 2:28 PM ET

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Statements   |   Zambia

CPJ pleased by Kabwela acquittal in Zambia

We issued the following statement after the Lusaka Magistrate Court acquitted Zambian journalist Chansa Kabwela today on pornography charges. The independent daily Post editor was charged with pornography for disseminating photos to several government officials of a woman giving birth in a hospital car park during a nurses strike in June...

November 16, 2009 1:25 PM ET

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2009

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