Technology

14 results arranged by date

Ghana police officials receive technology

US, UK, Interpol give Ghana phone hacking tools, raising journalist concerns on safety and confidentiality

In May 2019, senior members of Ghana’s law enforcement posed for photos with the U.S. ambassador to their country at a ceremony in the capital, Accra. Between them they held boxes and bags, gifts from the U.S. government to Ghana which, according to one of the recipients, contained Israeli phone hacking technology. That recipient was…

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The Facebook logo is displayed on a mobile phone screen photographed on a COVID-19 illustration graphic background on March 25, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. CPJ and partners called on social media and content sharing platforms to preserve data amid the pandemic. (AFP/Olivier Douliery)

CPJ, partners call on social media and content sharing platforms to preserve data

The World Health Organization has called the novel coronavirus an “infodemic” and the topic of disinformation and “fake news” has remained at the forefront of this century’s worst pandemic, with social media and tech platforms playing a central role. COVID-19 has forced many companies to move to remote work, and tech platforms and social media…

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, left, and French President Emmanuel Macron hold a press conference at the Elysee Palace in Paris, on May 15, 2019. In the wake of a deadly terror attack in Christchurch, tech regulation in the EU and Australia risks restricting journalism. (Yoan Valat/Pool Photo via AP)

In wake of Christchurch, tech regulation in EU and Australia risks restricting journalism

Terrorism has gone viral. The livestreaming on Facebook of the March attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand that news reports said left more than 50 people dead was the latest in a string of terrorist attacks designed for the digital age. More than a dozen world leaders met in Paris last month to…

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Google's logo is seen outside its office in Beijing. If the company were to launch a censored news app in China, it would send a message to other companies and other countries that trading press freedom principles for access to lucrative markets is acceptable. (Reuters/Thomas Peter)

Google complicity in Chinese censorship could endanger press freedom elsewhere

In 2010, after four years of offering Chinese users a heavily censored version of its search engine, Google decided it would no longer block search results at the request of the Chinese state. “Our objection is to those forces of totalitarianism,” Sergey Brin, Google’s co-founder, told The New York Times at the time, adding that…

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The Capitol Building is seen from Russell Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C. in December 2017. A group of senators is trying to attach the CLOUD Act to an upcoming spending bill that needs to be passed before midnight on March 23 to avoid government shutdown, according to news reports. (Reuters/Aaron P. Bernstein)

CPJ expresses concerns with the U.S. CLOUD Act

New York, March 20, 2018–The Committee to Protect Journalists today expressed its concerns with the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act and its potential to expose journalists to targeting by foreign governments. The CLOUD Act would make it easier for some foreign governments to obtain data from U.S. technology companies and allow U.S.…

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A screen shot of the new label on RT's YouTube channel. (CPJ)

YouTube labels on public broadcasters draw ire in US, Russia

With claims to more than one billion users consuming content in 76 languages, Google’s YouTube has become a core part of most media outlets’ dissemination strategy. And although there are 88 localized versions of the service, YouTube.com remains the largest and most influential platform for reaching a global audience. Which is why, when the site…

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Journalists from The Northern Echo newspaper in Darlington, England, are among scores of reporters who have been spied on by British police. New draft regulations would further undermine protection of sources. (AP/Raphael Satter)

Expanded surveillance powers could threaten work of journalists in UK

Brussels, May 5, 2017–The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by news reports that the U.K. government wants to push telecommunication companies to introduce real-time surveillance and the removal of encryption. On Thursday, The Register published leaked draft regulations detailing how telecommunications operators would be required to grant real-time access to individuals under warrant within…

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Chinese Import

Russia tries to emulate Beijing’s model of information control By Emily Parker Russia has embarked on an ambitious social experiment. Just a few years ago, Russians had a mostly free internet. Now Moscow is looking toward Beijing, trying to imitate the Chinese model of internet control. Yet the Kremlin will likely find that once you…

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Introduction: The New Face of Censorship

Governments and non-state actors find innovative ways to suppress the media By Joel Simon In the days when news was printed on paper, censorship was a crude practice involving government officials with black pens, the seizure of printing presses and raids on newsrooms. The complexity and centralization of broadcasting also made radio and television vulnerable…

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CPJ welcomes UN Human Rights resolution on releasing jailed journalists, right to encryption

Washington, September 29, 2016–The United Nations Human Rights Council’s annual resolution on journalist safety for the first time urges all states to release arbitrarily detained journalists. The resolution, co-sponsored by 87 countries and adopted today in Geneva, raises new concerns about mounting attacks on journalists during elections and calls for states to protect the confidentiality…

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