Media Law

25 results arranged by date

A protester wears a T-shirt denouncing Myanmar's telecommunications law in January 2017. The law is used to stifle online criticism and reporting. (AFP/Ye Aung Thu)

Myanmar: One year under Suu Kyi, press freedom lags behind democratic progress

When Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and her long-persecuted National League for Democracy party won elected office in November 2015, bringing an end to nearly five decades of authoritarian military rule, many local journalists saw the democratic result as a de facto win for press freedom.

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Labour MP Chris Bryant holds copies of the Leveson Report into press ethics in 2012, which led to the creation of Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act. A consultation on enacting the restrictive legislation, which came about as a result of the inquiry, ends January 10. (AFP/Justin Tallis)

UK’s Section 40 press law would curb independent, investigative journalism

British journalists say the future of independent and investigative journalism in the U.K. is at stake, as a deadline for public consultation on press regulation ends tomorrow. If it is implemented, Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013 would leave news outlets not signed up to an official press regulator liable for the…

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Proposed changes to Mexico’s right to reply would increase burden on media

Mexico City, November 4, 2016­–The Committee to Protect Journalists expressed concern today over proposed changes to Mexico’s media regulations that could force the press to publish or broadcast more replies to news stories. The changes are due to be voted on by the country’s Supreme Court November 7.

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Reporters surround Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in February. Journalists say control of the media has been tightened since he came to power. (AFP/Jiji Press)

Abe administration throttles media independence, journalists and UN say

Late in 2015, the Japanese government asked David Kaye, the U.N. special rapporteur on the right to freedom of opinion and expression, to reschedule a visit planned for December. At the time, some news outlets speculated that the administration of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, under criticism for rising threats to free expression, was trying to…

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Copies of Jordanian newspapers. During a CPJ mission there in February, the country's journalists said conditions for the press are deteriorating. (CPJ/Jason Stern)

Mission Journal: Rise in journalist arrests tarnishes Jordan’s image as reformist

The phone call came just as our conversation about the escalating crackdown on Jordanian media hit its stride. Lina Ejeilat, the co-founder of the news website 7iber (pronounced hebber), apologized and said she had to take the call. It was 7iber’s lawyer and it was important. For years the website had fought against a requirement…

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How U.S. copyright law is being used to take down Correa’s critics in Ecuador

On December 30, César Ricaurte, the executive director of Fundamedios, received a copyright complaint with the potential to close his entire website. The complaint, filed on behalf of Ecuador’s communications regulator SECOM by a company called Ares Rights, ordered the independent press freedom group to remove an image of President Rafael Correa from its website,…

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Tanzania imposes permanent ban on weekly newspaper

New York, January 21, 2016–The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on authorities in Tanzania to end their harassment of the weekly newspaper Mawio. The Kiswahili-language newspaper was permanently banned from publishing in print and online Friday and two of its editors were briefly detained, according to reports.

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The headquarters of TVP in Warsaw. Poland's new media law moves toward giving the government greater powers over the public broadcaster. (Reuters/Slawomir Kaminski)

Will the EU’s actions speak louder than its words on Poland’s new media law?

On January 13, the European Commission–the so-called guardian of EU treaties–will meet in Brussels to debate a troubling law passed in Poland today that, according to reports, paves the way for the government to take control of public service TV and radio.

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Aseem Trivedi speaks to the media after his arrest in 2012. Charges against the cartoonist have been dropped after India overturned part of its Information Technology Act. (Reuters/Danish Siddiqui)

India’s landmark online speech ruling is step toward greater press freedom

In an historic decision, India’s Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down part of a law used to silence criticism and free expression. While this marks a pivotal victory that has been welcomed in many quarters, many challenges remain for press freedom in the country.

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Ecuador court paves way for media regulation under constitution

Bogotá, November 5, 2014–The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by a decision by Ecuador’s highest court that has paved the way for a constitutional amendment that would categorize the news media as a “public service” subject to government regulation.

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