Criminal Code

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Police are seen in Montevideo, Uruguay, on January 8, 2015. Proposed legislation in Uruguay's parliament would criminalize insulting the police. (AFP/Mario Goldman)

Legislation proposed by new Uruguayan president criminalizes insulting police

Miami, May 14, 2020 — Uruguayan lawmakers should reject a proposed regulation criminalizing insulting police, and ensure that laws do not infringe on free expression, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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Prime Minister Viktor Orban is seen in the House of Parliament in Budapest, Hungary, on March 23, 2020. The parliament is considering amendments to the country's penal code that could imprison journalists covering the COVID-19 outbreak. (AP/Tamas Kovacs/MTI)

Proposed Hungarian laws could imprison journalists covering coronavirus response

Berlin, March 24, 2020 — Hungarian lawmakers should not pass amendments to the country’s criminal code that threaten journalists with prison sentences for their coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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A street vendor waits for customers in Kathmandu, Nepal, on July 18, 2018. A new criminal code came into effect on August 17 in Nepal that threatened press freedom. (Reuters/Navesh Chitrakar)

New Nepali criminal code threatens press freedom

Washington, D.C., August 20, 2018–Nepal’s government must repeal or amend the new criminal code that came into effect on August 17 to remove provisions that severely threaten press freedom, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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A man fixes Gambia's flag on Feburary 16, 2017, during preparations for the swearing-in ceremony for Gambia's new president, Adama Barrow. Gambia's Supreme Court decided on May 9, 2018, to declare criminal defamation unconstitutional, but upheld segments of the country's criminal code on sedition and false news, according to reports. (Reuters/Thierry Gouegnon)

Gambia declares criminal defamation unconstitutional, keeps some laws on sedition, false news

Nairobi, May 10, 2018–The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the Gambian Supreme Court’s decision yesterday to declare criminal defamation unconstitutional, but is dismayed that segments of the country’s criminal code on sedition and false news were upheld.

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