Courtney C. Radsch/CPJ Advocacy Director

Courtney C. Radsch, PhD, is the advocacy director at the Committee to Protect Journalists and the author of Cyberactivism and Citizen Journalism in Egypt: Digital Dissidence and Political Change. As a veteran journalist, researcher, and free expression advocate she writes and speaks frequently about the intersection of media, technology, and human rights. Follow her on Twitter @courtneyr.

Journalists are seen in London on April 7, 2020. CPJ recently partnered with groups launching surveys to track the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on journalism. (AP/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Surveys seek to understand impact of COVID-19 on journalists

The Committee to Protect Journalists has partnered with the International Center For Journalists and the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University on the journalism safety and press freedom aspects of their joint Journalism and the Pandemic Project, which today launched an online survey to track the COVID-19 pandemic’s global impact on journalism.

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An antenna is seen in Bogota, Colombia, on December 19, 2019. The Global Network Initiative, a coalition of groups including CPJ, recently called on govermnents to maintain internet connectivity during the COVID-19 crisis. (Reuters/Luis Jaime Acosta)

Network shutdowns restrict reporting during COVID-19 crisis

The Global Network Initiative, a coalition of nongovernmental organizations of which CPJ is a member, issued a statement yesterday calling on governments to refrain from shutting down internet access amid the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The Facebook logo is displayed on a mobile phone screen photographed on a COVID-19 illustration graphic background on March 25, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. CPJ and partners called on social media and content sharing platforms to preserve data amid the pandemic. (AFP/Olivier Douliery)

CPJ, partners call on social media and content sharing platforms to preserve data

The World Health Organization has called the novel coronavirus an “infodemic” and the topic of disinformation and “fake news” has remained at the forefront of this century’s worst pandemic, with social media and tech platforms playing a central role. COVID-19 has forced many companies to move to remote work, and tech platforms and social media…

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AFP photographer Diptendu Dutta works during a government-imposed nationwide lockdown as a preventive measure against the spread of COVID-19 in Siliguri, India, on April 10, 2020. Freelance journalists have faced risks to their lives and livelihoods amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (AFP)

Freelance journalists risk lives and livelihoods amid COVID-19 pandemic

Johannesburg-based freelance journalist Yeshiel Panchia was on his way to cover a story about a local developer who had found a way to keep his wage laborers employed during South Africa’s coronavirus lockdown by letting them live on the construction site so that they didn’t have to leave “home” in contravention of strict rules.

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Human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, British then-Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, and Canadian then-Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland address a news conference on media freedom in Dinard, France on April 5, 2019. A panel of legal experts led by Clooney recommend more sanctions targeted at press freedom violators. (Reuters/Stephane Mahe)

CPJ welcomes call for targeted sanctions to protect journalists

When the U.K. launched an initiative to support media freedom in the waning days of Jeremy Hunt’s tenure as foreign minister, CPJ was skeptical that this government-led effort would be more than a feel-good campaign. However, we chose to engage, given the current vacuum of leadership on press freedom globally. As the U.S. pulls back…

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, left, and French President Emmanuel Macron hold a press conference at the Elysee Palace in Paris, on May 15, 2019. In the wake of a deadly terror attack in Christchurch, tech regulation in the EU and Australia risks restricting journalism. (Yoan Valat/Pool Photo via AP)

In wake of Christchurch, tech regulation in EU and Australia risks restricting journalism

Terrorism has gone viral. The livestreaming on Facebook of the March attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand that news reports said left more than 50 people dead was the latest in a string of terrorist attacks designed for the digital age. More than a dozen world leaders met in Paris last month to…

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A memorial in Valletta for investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, who was murdered in Malta last year. (CPJ)

Efforts to find mastermind in murder of Malta journalist Caruana Galizia stalled

Journalists don’t typically get murdered in Western European democracies that are members of the European Union. Which is why the murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia in Malta last year was so shocking, and the lack of progress on finding the mastermind so disturbing.

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People attend the YouTube Fanfest in Jakarta, Indonesia, in October 2016. Google released its first YouTube-specific transparency report in May. (Reuters/Beawiharta)

Greater transparency welcome but social media sites should allow independent audits of content takedowns

In recent days, some of the world’s largest tech companies released new transparency reports, opened up their content moderation guidelines, and adopted approaches to fighting pernicious content as they tried to head off government regulation amid concerns about “fake news,” harassment, terrorism and other ills proliferating on their platforms.

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People hold signs saying 'Impunity kills' during a 2013 memorial in Kiev for murdered Ukrainian journalist Georgy Gongadze. The US decision to withdraw from UNESCO will make the world less safe for journalists. (AFP/Sergei Supinsky)

US withdrawal from UNESCO is blow for press freedom

The U.S. government’s decision to withdraw from the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), which has a mandate to promote “the free flow of ideas by word and image [and] to foster free, independent, and pluralistic media in print, broadcast and online,” will make the world less safe for journalists, a joint statement…

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Greg Gianforte. right, with Paul Ryan, before his swearing in ceremony in June. CPJ met with the congressman to discuss press freedom issues on October 5. (Pete Marovich/Getty Images/AFP)

CPJ meeting with Gianforte is disappointingly brief

When Montana Congressman Greg Gianforte agreed to donate $50,000 to CPJ as part of his settlement with Guardian journalist Ben Jacobs, whom he body slammed during a congressional race in May, I reached out to set up a meeting to see if Gianforte was serious about his hope that “some good can come of [the]…

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