CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views

John Otis

John Otis, CPJ's Andes correspondent for the Americas program, works as a correspondent for Time magazine and the Global Post. He authored the 2010 book Law of the Jungle, about U.S. military contractors kidnapped by Colombian rebels, and is based in Bogotá, Colombia.

Blog   |   Bolivia

Bolivia's president and state-run TV skip presidential election debate

President Evo Morales wasn't the only no show at Bolivia's lone presidential debate in the run-up to this Sunday's election. State-run Bolivia TV, which has provided live coverage of every presidential debate since the late 1980s, also ignored the September 28 candidate forum.

Blog   |   Bolivia

Journalist investigates Bolivia's 'silent campaign' for editorial control

At a bizarre news conference in April, Bolivia's Communications Minister Amanda Dávila claimed that journalist Raúl Peñaranda, who was born in Chile, represented a dangerous "beachhead" for Chilean interests trying to deny landlocked Bolivia access to the Pacific.

September 25, 2014 4:16 PM ET

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Blog   |   Peru

Peru Interior minister under investigation in 1988 journalist murder

Some of Peru's top government officials, including President Ollanta Humala, are former army officers who spent the 1980s fighting Maoist Shining Path guerrillas. Both sides committed massive human rights abuses, but now one particularly brutal episode is coming back to haunt the Humala administration.

July 9, 2014 10:10 AM ET

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Blog   |   Ecuador

Pressured by government, Ecuadoran cartoonist is forced to adjust

Called to testify before a government media oversight commission, editorial cartoonist Xavier Bonilla--known by his penname Bonil--showed up with a pair of four-foot-long mock pencils. But rather than having a small eraser on the tip, one of Bonil's giant pencils was nearly all eraser.

Blog   |   Ecuador

Ecuador newspaper shutters its presses, citing government pressure

Blaming government harassment and a related advertising slowdown, the daily newspaper Hoy ceased its Quito-based print edition Monday, and said it would transform into an online-only newspaper.

Blog   |   Ecuador

Ecuador's year-old media law stifles in-depth reporting

Rafael Correa is awarded an honorary doctorate by Santiago University in Chile on May 14, 2014. Four newspapers face fines for not covering the event sufficiently. (Reuters/Ivan Alvarado)

Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa generated little actual news during a two-day trip to Chile last month. So Ecuador's four main newspapers did the obvious: They published short wire service dispatches about his visit.

Blog   |   Venezuela

Venezuelan economic controls lead to newsprint shortage

Although nearly all Venezuelan newspapers have websites, many of their readers like to get their news the old-fashioned way: on paper. But that's getting tougher every day amid a critical shortage of newsprint.

Blog   |   Venezuela

Web-based TV opens space for critical voices in Venezuela

This screen shot shows EUTV's home page. (CPJ)

With its low budget décor and grainy images, EUTV has the look and feel of small-town community television. But the Web-based TV station that went live on November 18 has much larger ambitions: It intends to be the primary source for Venezuelans who covet independent television news.

December 19, 2013 2:12 PM ET

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Blog   |   Internet, Venezuela

Venezuela forces ISPs to police Internet

The socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro is forcing Internet service providers to act as policemen. (AP/Ariana Cubillos)

The concept of network neutrality holds that all Internet traffic should be treated equal and that Internet Service Providers, or ISPs, should serve as free-flowing gateways for information rather than as filters. But in politically polarized Venezuela, neutrality is an increasingly rare commodity and now ISPs are feeling the heat.

December 12, 2013 4:57 PM ET

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Blog   |   Venezuela

Venezuela tries to suppress reports of economic upheaval

Shoppers flock to stores after the government orders business owners to lower prices. (Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins)

Amid skyrocketing inflation and shortages of basic goods, Venezuelan authorities claim that an "economic war" is being waged against the socialist government of President Nicolás Maduro. The government is striking back by forcing stores to discount prices, by arresting business owners accused of hoarding--and by targeting journalists trying to cover the grim economic news.

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