Surveillance

134 results arranged by date

Blog   |   UK

UK's proposed Espionage Act will treat journalists like spies

Theresa May, pictured in Brussels in March 2016. Her government is proposing an Espionage Act under which journalists who obtain leaked information could face lengthy prison sentences. (AP/Virginia Mayo,File)

Journalists in Britain are becoming increasingly alarmed by the government's apparent determination to prevent them from fulfilling their mission to hold power to account. The latest manifestation of this assault on civil liberties is the so-called Espionage Act. If passed by parliament, it could lead to journalists who obtain leaked information, along with the whistle blowers who provide it to them, serving lengthy prison sentences.

Blog   |   USA

CPJ calls on Homeland Security secretary to reject password proposal

A traveler arrives at New York's JFK airport. Suggestions by the Homeland Security Secretary that passengers be asked for social media passwords would impact journalists. (Reuters/Brendan McDermid)

The Committee to Protect Journalists is concerned by Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly's suggestion to a committee hearing that the U.S. could request social media profile and password information as a condition to entering the country. Such requirements would have an impact on journalists by undermining their ability to protect sources and work product, and would represent an escalation of the press freedom challenges journalists face at U.S. borders.

Blog   |   China

In China, sources face harassment, jail for speaking to foreign media

A passerby reads newspapers posted on a bulletin board in Beijing. Some foreign correspondents in China say they are finding it hard to find citizens willing to be interviewed. (AFP/Teh Eng Koon)

Zhang Lifan is a Beijing-based historian specializing in modern Chinese history. He is also an outspoken critic of the Chinese government who is interviewed regularly by the foreign press--even when it leads to harassment from officials. Last month alone, he was quoted in a New York Times article about the government revising the length of a war with Japan in history books, The Washington Post and Bloomberg in reports on President Xi Jinping's visit to the World Economic Forum in Davos, The Associated Press on a story about U.S. President Donald Trump's inaugural speech, and by Voice of America in a piece on the government's crackdown on news websites.

Reports   |   Internet, Journalist Assistance, Security

The Best Defense

Only universal technical security will keep journalists safe

By Tom Lowenthal, CPJ Staff Technologist

Journalism is an information field — its practice is based on communication with sources, compiling and analyzing information and data, and then publishing and sharing the results. Like most members of modern society, journalists rely on mobile phones, laptops, email, instant messages, and online service providers to conduct their work, but journalism is heavily impacted by technology trends.

(Scout Tufankjian/CPJ)

Blog   |   Canada

Surveillance of journalists and court orders puts Canada's press freedom at risk

VICE News reporter Ben Makuch is appealing a court order to make him hand over details of his communication with a source. (VICE News)

On February 6, VICE News reporter Ben Makuch is due to appear in court to appeal an order requesting that he hand over details of his communication with a source. The hearing comes ahead of a day of action being planned in Canada for February 25, when press freedom and privacy activists are due to lobby the government over issues including surveillance powers and an anti-terrorism bill.

Alerts   |   UK

UK police monitored calls of Daily Mirror and Northern Echo journalists

New York, January 13, 2017--U.K. police used surveillance powers to monitor the phone calls of three journalists to try to reveal their sources in two separate stories, according to news reports.

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: Why U.S. needs to be global leader in protecting strong encryption

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

Protesters gather outside a district court in March 2016 after Apple was ordered to retrieve encrypted data from the phone of a suspected gunman. Civil rights groups say forcing companies to weaken encryption endangers privacy. (AFP/Frederic J. Brown)

Blog   |   USA

Transition to Trump: What Obama's Freedom of Information legacy means for press

As a new presidential administration prepares to take over the U.S., CPJ examines the status of press freedom, including the challenges journalists face from surveillance, harassment, limited transparency, the questioning of libel laws, and other factors.

President Obama signs the Freedom of Information Improvement Act of 2016. Journalists say there are still delays in accessing information. (AFP/Brendan Smialowski)

Alerts   |   Egypt

CPJ calls on Egypt to lift travel ban on blogger Esraa Abdel Fattah

New York, December 23, 2016--Egypt must lift the travel ban imposed on Esraa Abdel Fattah, an Egyptian blogger, columnist, and social media activist, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Abdel Fattah has been under a travel ban for nearly two years, alongside other bloggers and civil society activists who authorities have accused of illegally receiving foreign funding.

Alerts   |   Thailand

Thai legislation threatens online freedoms

A website displays a message from the Thai Ministry of Digital Economy and Society reading, "This website contains content and information that is deemed inappropriate. It has been censored by the Ministry of Digital Economy and Society," November 17, 2016. (AP)

Bangkok, December 16, 2016--Thailand's cabinet and king should scrap legislation that would give authorities sweeping new powers to censor the internet based on vague and broad criteria, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The military-appointed National Legislative Assembly today passed amendments to the 2007 Computer Crime Act that would severely restrict Thais' rights to privacy and to freely impart and receive information.

December 16, 2016 1:04 PM ET

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