Legislation

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Blog   |   Morocco

Mission Journal: Morocco's new press law undermined by draft penal code

King Mohammed VI waves a Moroccan flag as he inaugurates a solar plant in Ouarzazate, central Morocco, on February 4, 2016. The king and national symbols like the flag are sensitive subjects for the media. (AP/Abdeljalil Bounhar)

In the small, polished Moroccan capital of Rabat, pictures of King Mohamed VI, who took the throne in 1999, hang in many shops, offices, and hotels. In most of these, he is clean-shaven, smiling, and wearing a suit: a modern monarch. His image is part of the official narrative of the country as a place of moderation and progress.

Letters   |   Myanmar

CPJ urges Myanmar to reform laws restricting press freedom

CPJ writes to Myanmar's President Htin Kyaw to urge him to prioritize reforming laws that restrict press freedom.

Blog   |   Gambia, Iraq, Russia, USA

Global Magnitsky Act could be powerful weapon against impunity in journalist murders

The funeral of Sergei Magnitsky is held in Moscow on November 20, 2009. The lawyer died in state custody after exposing official corruption. (Reuters/Mikhail Voskresensky)

Last week, the proposed Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act emerged from the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee with approval. The bill was passed by the Senate last year. If passed by the full House of Representatives and signed into law by the president, it has the potential to offer partial redress to one of the most chilling truths facing journalists today: in 90 percent of cases, the murders of journalists go unpunished.

Blog   |   Nigeria

CPJ joins call for Nigeria to drop anti-social media legislation

The Committee to Protect Journalists alongside 19 Nigerian, African and international organisations today signed an open letter addressed to the upper chamber of Nigeria's parliament calling for the rejection of a bill which would undermine press freedom, stifle public opinion, and criminalize freedom of expression in Nigeria.

December 16, 2015 2:24 PM ET

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Statements   |   South Africa

CPJ urges South Africa to revise cybercrime bill that limits press freedom

New York, December 10, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on the South African government to revise provisions in the proposed Cybercrimes and Cybersecurity Bill that would limit journalists' ability to work. Under the bill, journalists and members of the public could be prosecuted for possessing or disclosing state information, reports said.

December 10, 2015 4:53 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Togo

CPJ calls on Togo president to reject law that would impose jail terms for journalists

Abuja, Nigeria, November 12, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on the president of Togo to block a proposed article in the country's penal code that would threaten press freedom. Under the proposed law, journalists could face jail sentences and fines for "false news," according to news reports.

November 12, 2015 8:45 AM ET

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Reports   |   Tunisia

In Tunisia, press freedom erodes amid security fears

Hard-earned press freedom in Tunisia is under threat as journalists are squeezed between violent extremists and security services sensitive to criticism in the wake of deadly terror attacks. While Islamist militants threaten the media, the government introduces restrictive legislation and security forces legally harass and even assault journalists. In this climate, which is further restricted by regulatory disputes, some news outlets resort to self-censorship. A CPJ special report by Safa Ben Said

A journalist holds up a television frame during a protest in 2012. Tunisian news outlets have come under pressure in 2015. (Reuters/Anis Mili)

Blog   |   China

How China's national security and cybersecurity laws will further curb press freedom

Police gather near Beijing No. 3 People's Intermediate Court where veteran journalist Gao Yu is on trial on accusations of leaking state secrets, Friday, November 21, 2014. (AP/Ng Han Guan)

Convincing potential sources to share information and publishing independent journalism on social media or with the help of crowd-funding are a few of the practices that are likely to suffer under a pair of new Chinese laws--one passed, one still in draft form--local journalists tell CPJ.

Blog   |   France, Internet, Security

French surveillance law passes National Assembly, but it's not the last word

Protesters demonstrate against the government's bill giving spies sweeping new surveillance powers on May 4, 2015 in Paris. (AFP/Alain Jocard)

Until the last moment the opponents of a very controversial French intelligence bill tried to be heard. On Monday May 4 on the eve of the vote, activists kept calling deputies to convince them to reject the bill. They had no chance however, since the Socialist government could count on a solid majority from both mainstream left and right at the National Assembly, the lower house of the Parliament. The bill was swiftly and overwhelmingly adopted on Tuesday afternoon with 438 for, 86 against, and 42 abstentions. It will now be sent to the Senate where, despite the chamber being dominated by the center-right opposition, it is not expected to face significant hurdles. "It should be on the statute books by July ," BBC Paris correspondent Hugh Schofield predicted.

Blog   |   Hungary

Mission Journal: Creeping authoritarianism in Hungary

People protesting in Budapest about a new Internet tax on data use hold up their smartphones. (Reuters/Laszlo Balogh)

On the Buda side of the River Danube stands the glass and steel headquarters of the thriving German-owned entertainment channel RTL. On the Pest side of the Hungarian capital, tucked in a corner of a converted department store, lies the cramped office of struggling online news outlet Atlatszo.

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