Carlos Fernando Chamorro

11 results arranged by date

Blog   |   Nicaragua

Long silence from Nicaragua's president as first lady keeps press at arm's length

Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega with his wife, Rosario Murillo, at a memorial for Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez in 2014. Independent journalists say Murillo controls press access to Ortega. (Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas)

It's been nearly 3,000 days since Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega last held a news conference, according to the opposition newspaper La Prensa. But when journalists complain about the lack of access to Ortega they often direct their ire not at the president but at the first lady, Rosario Murillo.

Blog   |   Nicaragua

Reporters covering Nicaragua waterway project obstructed by lack of information

HKND Group chairman Wang Jing celebrates the start of work on Nicaragua's interoceanic waterway in December. Reporters say little information has been released on the $50 billion project. (AFP/STR)

When Nicaragua began preliminary work on an interoceanic waterway designed to handle ships too big for the Panama Canal, some of the foreign correspondents who had flown in to cover the December groundbreaking were left high and dry.

Attacks on the Press   |   Nicaragua

Attacks on the Press 2009: Nicaragua

Top Developments
• Ortega administration marginalizes private media.
• Authorities use legal harassment, smears against critics.

Key Statistic
0: Number of press conferences held by Ortega since taking office.

Three decades after a revolution swept the Sandinistas into power, the government of President Daniel Ortega still cast private media as enemies and moved forcefully to curtail their influence. Ortega—who led the 1979 uprising against the Somoza dictatorship and reclaimed the presidency in 2006 elections—employed a range of tactics to marginalize the press, including legal persecution, smear campaigns to discredit adversaries, and manipulation of state advertising to punish critical outlets.

February 16, 2010 12:24 AM ET


Blog   |   Argentina

Tomás Eloy Martínez, passionate press freedom advocate

Martínez (Reuters)

Argentine writer and journalist Tomás Eloy Martínez, who died on Monday after a long battle with cancer, was ranked among Latin America’s most prominent intellectuals. Best known for his novels about former President Juan Domingo Perón and his wife Eva, Martínez cared deeply about press freedom and was a passionate advocate who helped scores of Argentine reporters, and was actively involved in CPJ’s efforts to campaign on behalf on Cuban imprisoned journalists.

Martínez understood the difficulties journalists face while working on dangerous assignments or under repressive regimes. In 1975, he was forced to flee Argentina after serious threats from a right-wing paramilitary group. He lived in exile during the dictatorship era, and returned briefly to the country after democracy was restored in 1983.

Letters   |   Iran

Free Maziar Bahari: 100 global journalists petition Iran

Your Excellency: We are writing to express our grave concern at the detention of our esteemed fellow journalist Maziar Bahari and to request his immediate release. Mr. Bahari has been detained since June 21. No charges have been brought against him, and he has not been granted access to a lawyer. As one of the most impartial and committed journalists in his field, he has reported regularly over the past decade from the Middle East, principally from Iran and Iraq, and provided consistently balanced and insightful reports. As an award-winning documentary filmmaker, he has earned global respect for his work.

Reports   |   Nicaragua

Nicaragua Special Report: Daniel Ortega's Media War

Nicaragua’s president ignores the news media, except to harass his critics. By Carlos Lauría and Joel Simon

July 1, 2009 11:00 AM ET


Blog   |   Nicaragua

After outcry, Nicaragua drops case against critical editor

The Nicaraguan attorney general's office has dropped a criminal investigation into a nonprofit journalism organization headed by the prominent editor Carlos Fernando Chamorro Barrios after finding no evidence of wrongdoing. A remarkable number of media groups and individuals, including CPJ, spoke out against the investigation as politically motivated. 

Impact   |   Burkina Faso, Cuba, Gambia, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Nicaragua, USA

CPJ Impact

January 2009

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists

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