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Blog   |   China

Ever broader restrictions handed down for China's reporters

Yet another set of rules restricting the work of journalists in China takes the concept of "overbroad" to new heights. According to guidelines made public Tuesday by the official state news agency Xinhua, the new rules cover various "information, materials, and news products that journalists may deal with during their work, including state secrets, commercial secrets, and unpublicized information."

Blog   |   China

Conditions for international reporters deteriorating in China

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China released at the end of May its annual report on conditions for international journalists working in the country. As we have done in the past, we're posting this year's report as a PDF. The takeaway is that conditions have certainly not gotten better and many feel they have gotten worse, according to the 123 respondents to the survey, slightly more than half of its membership of 236.

Blog   |   China

Ilham Tohti's daughter fights for his freedom

At first glance, 19-year-old Jewher Ilham may seem like a typical college student. As she clutched her smart phone, the face of a cat imprinted on the cover peered through her fingers. She spoke in short sentences with little pause. Her thoughts pulled her in various directions as she spoke about her love for dance, juggling parental expectations, and what she has learned to cook during her past year in a small college town in the U.S.

May 8, 2014 3:23 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Chinese journalist Gao Yu is missing

Gao Yu (VOA)

On April 15, 1989, Hu Yaobang died. Hu had been general secretary of the Communist Party from 1982 to 1987, and recognized for his leanings toward economic reform in China. His death led to demonstrations around China, some of them in Tiananmen Square. On June 4, 1989, Tiananmen became the focus of the government's wrath, and in the intersections of the broad streets around the plaza, the government cracked down brutally. Since then, it has been a government tradition to start cracking down on protesters, critics, and dissidents before April 15, and this year is no different. China watchers say the strictures have already begun with warnings to some and detentions for others. I checked with foreign journalists over the weekend, and they say they're aware of the crackdowns, but are not feeling any heat themselves. Yet.

April 28, 2014 5:25 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

FCCC survey finds China abuses press card, visa process

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China (Beijing) published the findings of its annual visa survey last week. The findings are grim but come as no surprise following the Chinese government's showdown late last year with members of the foreign press. 

Blog   |   China

Chinese journalist Liu Jianfeng crowdsources his funding

Last July, veteran Chinese journalist Liu Jianfeng posted an announcement on the Chinese microblog Weibo, confirming his intention to become an independent investigator and writer. In a country where all media remains state-owned, Liu's plan was a bold one. He promised to produce four to six independent, investigative stories in the coming year, and to fund his costs by crowdsourcing. His financial target was 250,000 yuan (about US$40,000).

March 5, 2014 3:36 PM ET

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Blog   |   China

Journalists in Hong Kong and China: see our security guide

Journalists from Ming Pao hold up front pages of the paper to protest an attack on their former chief editor, Kevin Lau Chun-to. (Reuters/Bobby Yip)

CPJ's Journalist Security Guide is now available in Chinese (PDF). The guide has been available in other languages for more than a year but, frankly, we didn't see a Chinese version as a priority. Last year, after a university professor in China asked if he could translate some sections for his class, we began working on a Chinese version in simplified characters. We felt it was our responsibility to take care of the task ourselves. 

Blog   |   China

More light shed on 'China's tougher tactics'

Chinese policemen manhandle a foreign photographer outside the trial of Xu Zhiyong, founder of the New Citizens movement, in Beijing on January 26. (AP/Andy Wong)

Since CPJ blogged on Monday that tougher tactics are emerging in China toward local and foreign media--and the situation looks to get worse--a few more developments have arisen.

Blog   |   China

Tougher tactics emerge in China's media crackdown

Late in 2013, Time's Hannah Beech posted a great blog on the magazine's website around the time that about 24 foreign journalists were worried that the visas allowing them to work in China might not be approved: "Foreign Correspondents in China Do Not Censor Themselves to Get Visas," she told readers. She's right, of course, and some more proof that they won't dial back their coverage arose last week. 

Blog   |   China

Staff of Hong Kong's Ming Pao fights leadership change

Hong Kong's besieged media were dealt another blow this week, with news that the editor-in-chief of the city's once most trusted Chinese-language newspaper will be replaced with a potentially pro-establishment editor. 

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