Legislation

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The Bolivian parliament is seen in La Paz on April 29, 2020. Bolivia recently passed an emergency decree broadening criminal sanctions for spreading disinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic. (Reuters/David Mercado)

Bolivian decree broadens criminal sanctions for disinformation on COVID-19

Editors’ Note: On May 14, after CPJ published this article, the Bolivian representative to the Organization of American States announced that the government had issued a new decree eliminating the language that CPJ objected to in Decree 4231, and two other passages that had raised freedom of expression concerns, according to news reports and a…

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Police are seen in Montevideo, Uruguay, on January 8, 2015. Proposed legislation in Uruguay's parliament would criminalize insulting the police. (AFP/Mario Goldman)

Legislation proposed by new Uruguayan president criminalizes insulting police

Miami, May 14, 2020 — Uruguayan lawmakers should reject a proposed regulation criminalizing insulting police, and ensure that laws do not infringe on free expression, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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People are seen outside a bank in Istanbul, Turkey, on April 21, 2020. Turkey recently passed a financial regulation that may restrict economic reporting. (AFP/Ozan Kose)

New finance regulation threatens economic reporting in Turkey

Istanbul, May 11, 2020 — Turkish authorities should revise a recently passed financial regulation to ensure that it cannot be used against journalists, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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People use computers in Lagos, Nigeria, on January 20, 2020. Nigerian journalists recently spoke with CPJ about their concerns over a proposed social media bill. (Reuters/Temilade Adelaja)

‘An attempt to gag the media’: Journalists on Nigeria’s proposed social media bill

At a public hearing on Nigeria’s social media bill held in Abuja last month, the voice of Chris Isiguzo, president of the Nigerian Union of Journalists (NUJ), rang clearly across the room: “This bill…seeks to pigeonhole Nigerians from freely expressing themselves.” The NUJ is “totally opposed” to it, he said.

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Prime Minister Viktor Orban is seen in the House of Parliament in Budapest, Hungary, on March 23, 2020. The parliament is considering amendments to the country's penal code that could imprison journalists covering the COVID-19 outbreak. (AP/Tamas Kovacs/MTI)

Proposed Hungarian laws could imprison journalists covering coronavirus response

Berlin, March 24, 2020 — Hungarian lawmakers should not pass amendments to the country’s criminal code that threaten journalists with prison sentences for their coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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A general view of the hemicycle shown ahead of a plenary session of the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium on March 9, 2020. The parliament is drafting legislation on terrorist content online that could affect journalists reporting the news. (Reuters/Francois Lenoir)

EU online terrorist content legislation risks undermining press freedom

Brussels, March 11, 2020—The European Parliament should strengthen protections for journalism in draft legislation on terrorist content online, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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Uruguayan President-elect Luis Lacalle Pou takes a selfie during the announcement of his incoming cabinet, in Montevideo, Uruguay, in December 2019. His party is seeking to introduce the "right to be forgotten" in a hasty legislative process, raising press freedom concerns. (Reuters/Mariana Greif)

Uruguay’s incoming government must consider press freedom in draft ‘urgency law’

Miami, February 6, 2020—A proposed law introducing the so-called “right to be forgotten” in Uruguay could have negative implications for the work of journalists and access to information online, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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Road Town, in the British Virgin Islands, is seen on April 3, 2009. The territory's legislature recently passed a bill that imposes harsh penalties for online defamation. (AP/Todd VanSickle)

British Virgin Islands law to impose fines, jail terms for online defamation

Miami, December 23, 2019 — British Virgin Islands Governor Augustus Jaspert should reject cybercrime legislation recently approved by the territory’s legislature, or require revisions to the bill to protect press freedom, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma, is seen in Moscow on April 17, 2019. The State Duma recently passed legislation that would add individual journalists and bloggers to the country’s list of “foreign agents.” (Reuters/Sputnik/Alexander Astafyev)

CPJ joins call for Russian government to drop foreign agent bill

The Committee to Protect Journalists today joined nine other international press freedom organizations in signing a statement urging Russia to drop draft legislation that would add individual journalists and bloggers to the country’s list of “foreign agents.”

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The Dutch Parliament is seen in The Hague, Netherlands, on September 27, 2018. The parliament is considering legislation that could expose journalists to jail time for reporting from terrorist-controlled areas without government permission. (Reuters/Eva Plevier)

CPJ calls for modification of Dutch terrorism bill to protect press freedom

Berlin, November 4, 2019 — Dutch lawmakers should amend a bill that could expose journalists to jail time for reporting from terrorist-controlled areas without government permission, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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