April 2017

Alerts   |   Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan government seeks order to permanently block news websites

New York, April 28, 2017--The Azerbaijani government should immediately stop trying to permanently block access to five independent media outlets' websites and should instead lift a decree that has rendered them currently inaccessible, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. A district court in the capital Baku yesterday began hearing a government lawsuit that seeks to compel internet service providers (ISPs) to block access to the sites, adjourning until May 1, according to media reports.

Alerts   |   Macedonia

At least two journalists injured as protesters storm Macedonian parliament

Macedonian Social Democratic Party leader Zoran Zaev, who was among those injured when protesters stormed the parliament on April 27, 2017, reacts at a news conference in Skopje the following day. (Reuters/Ognen Teofilovski)

Brussels, April 28, 2017--Macedonian police and prosecutors should swiftly bring to justice those responsible for injuring at least two journalists and assaulting at least four others in last night's storming of the parliament building, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Nationalist demonstrators, many of them wearing masks and hoods, last night stormed the building in the capital Skopje to protest yesterday's election of an ethnic-Albanian politician as speaker of the parliament, according to media reports and journalists who were present at the scene.

Impact

CPJ Highlights: April edition

CPJ releases Attacks on the Press

CPJ launched the 2017 edition of our annual publication Attacks on the Press at two events on April 25. The book, "The New Face of Censorship," explores the evolution of censorship tactics into sophisticated tools used to control the flow of information around the world.

Nearly 500 U.S. and international media outlets, including Newsweek, MediaFiled, The Boston Globe, the Press Gazette, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, and the Somaliland Press, reported on the book's release. The book is available to read online or in a hard copy through Bloomberg Press, an imprint of Wiley. CPJ gratefully acknowledges the generous support from Bloomberg, which underwrites the annual publication of Attacks on the Press.

April 28, 2017 4:28 PM ET

Alerts   |   Iran

Iran frees Issa Saharkhiz then sentences him to one year in jail

Issa Saharkhiz, in an undated family photo. The freelance journalist was sentenced to one year in prison the day after being freed. (Mehdi Saharkhiz)

New York, April 28, 2017--Iranian authorities should immediately drop all charges against freelance journalist Issa Saharkhiz, who was sentenced yesterday to one year in prison, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The sentence was handed down the day after Saharkhiz was released from jail on a separate charge, according to the journalist's son and his lawyer.

April 28, 2017 3:29 PM ET

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Alerts   |   India

Jammu and Kashmir state government censors 22 social media services

A Kashmiri youth reads a news item posted on his Facebook page in an internet cafe in Srinagar, India, August 27, 2010 (AP/Altaf Qadri)

New York, April 26, 2017--Indian officials in the state of Jammu and Kashmir should immediately revoke a one-month ban on access to social media services, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The order, announced today, directed all internet service providers to block users' access to 22 platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, WhatsApp, and YouTube, according to local reports.

April 26, 2017 5:14 PM ET

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Statements   |   Zambia

Zambian journalist released from prison

Johannesburg, April 25, 2017--The unconditional release of Zambian journalist Chanda Chimba is a welcome end to the injustice he has suffered, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Chimba, who has advanced prostate cancer, was released on April 21 following a pardon on humanitarian grounds from Zambian President Edgar Lungu, Zambian media reported and Chimba's lawyer, Charles Lisita, told CPJ today.

April 25, 2017 3:07 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   USA

Fighting for the Truth

Journalists have a huge amount of work to do
By Christiane Amanpour

Never in a million years did I expect to find myself appealing for the freedom and safety of American journalists at home. Despite the hostile rhetoric of the U.S. presidential campaign, I hoped that after becoming president-elect, Donald Trump would change his approach to the press.

Attacks on the Press   |   France, Iraq, Mali, Syria

Being a Target

A reporter learns how to dodge terrorist threats to get the story
By Rukmini Callimachi

The convoy of cars flying al-Qaeda's black flag swept across northern Mali in 2012. Within weeks, it felt like a curtain had been drawn.

Attacks on the Press   |   Iraq, Mexico, Syria

Zone of Silence

The public is robbed of information when journalists are murdered
By Robert Mahoney

Journalist Avijit Roy founded the blog "Mukto-Mona," or Free Thinker, as a forum for free expression and ideas that challenged the growing religious intolerance in his native Bangladesh. His blog for intellectual freedom cost him his life.

Attacks on the Press   |   Cambodia, Laos, Mexico, Myanmar

Eluding the Censors

For all its faults, Facebook is a lifeline for journalists in less developed countries
By Karen Coates

Squeezed between China and Vietnam, Phongsali is the northernmost province of Laos, a land of mountains, valleys and isolated villages that is home to more than 15 ethnic groups. As recently as a few years ago, news traveled through Phongsali at a pace akin to regional traffic: slowly, on a bumpy route rife with potholes and disruptions.

Attacks on the Press

Right Is Might

We have the laws and institutions to fight attempts at information control
By David Kaye

Yevgeny Zamyatin's strikingly original 1920s Russian novel We gets read far less than its canonical English-language descendants, Brave New World and 1984. Yet George Orwell knew of and clearly drew from Zamyatin's book in creating 1984. The homage-paying is obvious: A solitary hero struggles to define himself in relation to society; a state and its mysteriously cultish leader control privacy, information, and thought; love is prohibited and freedom is categorically rejected; the violence and brutality of power lurk beneath a seemingly clean and mechanized society; common words are redefined and propaganda is pervasive in daily life; and, in total, reality is rejected in favor of myths and lies.

Attacks on the Press   |   Kenya

Fiscal Blackmail

The Kenyan government withdraws advertising when newspapers step out of line
By Alan Rusbridger

In some parts of the world, it is still possible to silence a journalist with a sharp blow to the side of the head. But as newspapers the world over struggle with the financial disruption of digital technologies, governments are finding new ways of controlling the press. Murder is messy. Money is tidy.

Attacks on the Press   |   North Korea

Supervised Access

North Korea masks deep censorship by admitting foreign reporters
By Jessica Jerreat

North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un's absolute grip on the flow of public information and deadly approach to dissent have made the country one of the most brutally censored in the world.

Attacks on the Press   |   Cuba

Connecting Cuba

Outdated laws and limited, expensive internet access slow the island nation's progress
By Carlos Lauría

Cuba's media landscape has begun opening up in recent years, transformed by a lively blogosphere, an increasing number of news websites carrying investigative reporting and news commentary, and an innovative breed of independent reporters who are critical of, yet still support, socialist ideas.

Attacks on the Press   |   Belgium, France, Spain

Self-Restraint vs. Self-Censorship

How much should journalists hold back when covering terrorism in Europe?
By Jean-Paul Marthoz

European journalists are on edge. Since the brutal execution of eight colleagues at the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on January 7, 2015, they have become acutely aware that they are in the firing line of extremists.

Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico

Edited by Drug Lords

Mexican journalists navigate threats and censorship by cartels
By Elisabeth Malkin

Adrián López Ortiz, the general director of Grupo Noroeste, a media group that owns the newspaper Noroeste in the northwestern Mexican city of Culiacán, was driving home from the airport in April 2014 when an SUV intercepted him. Two armed men got out and grabbed him, and he feared that he was going to be kidnapped. But they had other plans. One of them drove off in his car and the other stayed behind, kicked López and then shot him in both legs.

Attacks on the Press   |   Turkey

Willing Accomplice

Collusion by the Turkish media compounds the country's crisis
By Andrew Finkel

Turkey's bloody, failed military coup on July 15, 2016, and the ruthless crackdown that followed are testament to the country's escalating crisis of democracy. Though the crisis had been developing for years, with journalists and independent media outlets facing intense legal pressures from a government intent on serving elite interests rather than a free and open society, recent events illustrate a grave, new peril: the compliance and even complicity of the nation's mainstream media in its own emasculation and the suppression of objective news coverage.

Attacks on the Press   |   China, Russia

Chinese Import

Russia tries to emulate Beijing's model of information control
By Emily Parker

Russia has embarked on an ambitious social experiment. Just a few years ago, Russians had a mostly free internet. Now Moscow is looking toward Beijing, trying to imitate the Chinese model of internet control. Yet the Kremlin will likely find that once you give people internet freedom, it isn't so easy to completely take it away.

Attacks on the Press   |   China

Discredited

Journalists' online activity could hurt their financial standing under a new Chinese plan
By Yaqiu Wang

In what would be a uniquely daunting form of censorship, the Chinese government is making plans to link journalists' financial credibility to their online posts.

Attacks on the Press   |   Ecuador, Mexico

Disrupting the Debate

Governments use copyright laws and Twitter bots to curb criticism on social media
By Alexandra Ellerbeck

On July 10, 2016, Ecuadoran journalist Bernardo Abad tweeted that the former vice-president of Ecuador, Lenin Moreno, had not paid income taxes for the year before. A week later, Abad received a message from Twitter saying his account had been blocked for violating its terms of service. Within 24 hours, at least five others' accounts were temporarily suspended after they tweeted about Moreno's taxes. By the end of the week, nine accounts had been temporarily suspended, according to the freedom of expression advocacy group Fundamedios. Twitter declined to comment on the suspensions.

Attacks on the Press   |   USA

Case in Point

A journalist details one fight over records requests in the United States
By Michael Pell

In December 2010, Robin Gordon faced an ultimatum. She had found that a debt collection company had purchased a $291 tax lien on an apartment she owned in Atlanta, Georgia, after her mortgage company failed to pay a small portion of her Fulton County taxes five years earlier. Now, she could either pay the debt collection company $8,200, a 2,700 percent increase, or the sheriff's office would auction her apartment to pay the debt.

Attacks on the Press   |   USA

Thwarting Freedom of Information

Agencies exploit every loophole to evade disclosure requirements
By Jason Leopold

On December 13, 2016, I filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the FBI seeking a wide range of documents about a series of highly controversial decisions the bureau made in the weeks leading up to the U.S. presidential election that Democratic lawmakers and supporters of Hillary Clinton have claimed shifted support to her opponent, Donald Trump.

Attacks on the Press   |   USA

What Is the Worst-Case Scenario?

American journalists grapple with the Trump presidency
By Alan Huffman

The word "unprecedented" is often used to describe Donald Trump's antipathy toward the American media, as it is of many of his other approaches to governance.

Attacks on the Press   |   Egypt

A Loyal Press

Independence means isolation for journalists in Sisi's Egypt
By Ursula Lindsey

When President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi took office in Egypt in 2014, after leading the army's ouster of Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, he promised to restore peace and prosperity through strong leadership.

Attacks on the Press   |   South Sudan

From Fledgling to Failed

Even as the country collapses, South Sudan's government will brook no criticism
By Jacey Fortin

JUBA, South Sudan - The shooting began around 5:15 on a Friday afternoon.

Dozens of journalists had gathered in the pressroom at the Presidential Palace--a walled compound also known as "J1"--in the capital city. Following a few days of rising tensions, culminating in a checkpoint shoot-out just the night before, the president, Salva Kiir and the vice president, Riek Machar, former wartime rivals, were expected to hold a news conference calling for peace.

Attacks on the Press   |   Syria

Where I've Never Set Foot

Barred from Syria, a journalist must make sense of what she's told
By Alessandria Masi

The morning after the attack, my deputy editor and I lit cigarettes as we squatted on the green couch in our closet-size Beirut office, hanging out the window and talking about what we thought had really happened in Syria.

Attacks on the Press

Introduction: The New Face of Censorship

Governments and non-state actors find innovative ways to suppress the media
By Joel Simon

In the days when news was printed on paper, censorship was a crude practice involving government officials with black pens, the seizure of printing presses and raids on newsrooms. The complexity and centralization of broadcasting also made radio and television vulnerable to censorship even when the governments didn't exercise direct control of the airwaves. After all, frequencies can be withheld; equipment can be confiscated; media owners can be pressured.

April 25, 2017 8:01 AM ET

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Statements   |   Cameroon

In Cameroon, Ahmed Abba sentenced to 10 years in jail

Ahmed Abba is serving a 10-year jail sentence. (RFI)

New York, April 24, 2017--A military court in Cameroon today sentenced Ahmed Abba, a correspondent for Radio France Internationale's (RFI) Hausa service, to 10 years in prison and ordered him to make a payment of 55 million Central African francs (US$91,133) Abba's lawyer Clément Nakong, told CPJ. Abba, who has been held in pretrial detention for 635 days, was convicted of "non-denunciation of terrorism" and "laundering of the proceeds of terrorist acts," last week. Nakong said that he will appeal Abba's sentence within the 10 days set by the court.

April 24, 2017 6:23 PM ET

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Blog   |   Yemen

Collapse of state institutions leaves Yemeni journalists vulnerable

Houthis fighters secure a road between Hodeidah and Sanaa in Yemen on April 19, 2017. Journalists have been threatened and attacked in areas controlled by the Houthis. (AP/Hani Mohammed)

A journalist dies mysteriously in Yemen after receiving threats because of his work, and the resulting autopsy raises more questions than answers. A columnist in the same country is sentenced to death on espionage charges in an opaque trial.

Case   |   Brazil

Two photographers arrested for photographing Brazil protest

Striking police officers set fire to coffins to protest plans to cut police pensions in Brasilia, April 18, 2017. (AP/Eraldo Peres)

Police on April 17, 2017, arrested two Brazilian photographers who were taking photographs of a barricade of burning tires in the Jardins neighborhood of São Paulo and accused them of starting the fire, according to one of the photographers and the police report, which CPJ has reviewed.

Alerts   |   Maldives

Blogger stabbed to death in Maldives

A Sri Lankan woman in Colombo points to a photo of murdered Maldivian blogger Yameen Rasheed from his blog, April 23, 2017. (AP/Eranga Jayawardena)

New York, April 24, 2017--Authorities in the Maldives should swiftly identify and bring to justice those responsible for the murder of blogger Yameen Rasheed, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Rasheed died after he was found with multiple stab wounds in the stairway of his apartment building yesterday, according to media reports.

April 24, 2017 1:26 PM ET

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Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 23, 2017

Police detain a protester outside the Supreme Board of Elections in Ankara, April 16, 2017. (AP/Burhan Ozbilici)

German magazine correspondent denied credentials for 'insulting president'
Turkish authorities denied Raphael Geiger, the Turkey, Greece, and Middle East correspondent for the German magazine Stern, an extension of his press credentials, saying he had insulted Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the Turkish service of Deutsche Welle reported on April 26. Geiger, who is currently in Athens, said he did not know which of his articles had caused offense, media reports said.

[April 28, 2017]

Alerts   |   Turkey

Journalists detained in wake of Turkey referendum

Supporters of the 'No' campaign in Turkey's referendum protest in Istanbul on April 17. At least three journalists covering opposition to the vote have been detained. (AFP/Bulent Kilic)

New York, April 21, 2017--The Committee to Protect Journalists today called on Turkish authorities to stop jailing journalists and suppressing dissent in the wake of a referendum to change Turkey's system of governance from parliamentary to presidential. In the past week, police arrested at least three journalists and raided the newsroom of leftist website Sendika for reporting on protests over alleged irregularities in the referendum.

Alerts   |   Somalia

Somaliland editor detained after trading himself for colleague's freedom

New York, April 20, 2017--Somaliland authorities should immediately release Ibrahim Osman Ahmed, editor of Hangool News, who has been held without charge since April 15, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Ibrahim is in custody in Hargeisa Central Police Station after handing himself over to police to secure the release of Abdirahman Arab Da'ud, also from Hangool News, Guleid Ahmed Jama, chairperson of the Human Rights Center in Somaliland, told CPJ.

Statements   |   Cameroon

Cameroonian military court convicts journalist Ahmed Abba of terrorism charges

Ahmed Abba. (RFI)

New York, April 20, 2017--A military court in Cameroon today convicted Ahmed Abba, a journalist for Radio France Internationale's Hausa service, on charges of "non-denunciation of terrorism" and "laundering of the proceeds of terrorist acts," according to his lawyer and RFI. The Committee to Protect Journalists called on Cameroonian authorities not to contest the journalist's appeal and to release him without delay.

April 20, 2017 3:57 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Russia

Russian journalist dies after severe beating

Nikolai Andrushchenko poses for a photograph in St. Petersburg, October 9, 2016. (Denis Usov)

New York, April 20, 2017-- Russian federal authorities should swiftly bring to justice all those responsible for the murder of Nikolai Andrushchenko, co-founder of the weekly newspaper Novy Peterburg, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The journalist, known for his reporting on corruption and police brutality, died in a St. Petersburg hospital yesterday of injuries sustained in a beating last month. His killing marks the first CPJ has recorded of a journalist in Russia since 2013.

April 20, 2017 3:50 PM ET

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Blog   |   Germany

Proposed German legislation threatens broad internet censorship

A German legislator uses a mobile device during a session of the Bundestag in Berlin, March 1, 2013. (AP/Gero Breloer)

The German cabinet on April 5 approved a "Draft Law to Improve Law Enforcement in Social Networks" (Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz), ostensibly aimed at combatting disinformation and hate speech, that raises concerns about restrictions on free expression and the privatization of censorship. The law would compel social media companies to remove content or risk fines as high as 50 million euros. Human rights and press freedom groups, including CPJ, joined several social media companies that have been at the center of the debate over "fake news" and hate speech to express concern over the proposed law.

April 20, 2017 9:53 AM ET

Blog   |   Macedonia

In Macedonia, anti-press rhetoric leaves journalists feeling vulnerable

Election posters for Nikola Gruevski, of Macedonia's VMRO-DPMNE party, in Skopje in December. Gruevski, who is struggling to form a coalition government, accuses critical media of being foreign mercenaries. (AP/Boris Grdanoski)

As the political crisis in Macedonia, triggered by allegations of mass surveillance by intelligence agencies, deepens the environment is increasingly unsafe for journalists who report critically on the ruling Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization-Democratic Party for Macedonian National Unity (VMRO-DPMNE) and its leader, Nikola Gruevski.

Statements   |   Russia

Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta receives white powder in mail

A man leaves the editorial office of Novaya Gazeta in Moscow, January 26, 2009. (AP/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

New York, April 19, 2017--The independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta received an envelope containing an unidentified white powder this morning, the newspaper reported. The envelope's only return address was "Grozny," the capital of Chechnya, where preachers and political officials have recently threatened the newspaper for reporting on the alleged torture and detention of men suspected of homosexuality. The Committee to Protect Journalists called on Russian authorities to swiftly bring to justice those responsible for the threat.

April 19, 2017 1:11 PM ET

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Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 16, 2017

Opposition protesters shout slogans in Istanbul, April 17, 2017. (Reuters/Yagiz Karahan)

Wire reporter jailed
The Supreme Court of Appeals on April 14 upheld the Second Mardin Court for Serious Crimes' November 2016 sentence of two years and four months in prison against Meltem Oktay on charges of "making propaganda for a terrorist organization," the news website Dihaber reported yesterday.

Blog   |   USA

CPJ joins Fly Don't Spy campaign to protect journalists and their sources

(Access Now)

Over the past several months, the Committee to Protect Journalists has raised concerns over U.S. border agents' use of secondary searches of journalists and their devices at U.S. borders, and government proposals to require travelers to hand over social media account passwords as a condition of entry to the U.S. That is why today CPJ joined with 29 organizations to launch the Fly Don't Spy campaign. CPJ supports the rights of journalists to protect confidential information when traveling and is concerned about proposals that could undermine these values.

Statements   |   Ecuador, Peru

Journalist facing charges in Ecuador files for asylum in Peru

New York, April 18, 2017--Ecuadoran journalist Fernando Villavicencio, director of the news website Focus Ecuador and a critic of outgoing President Rafael Correa, today filed a petition for political asylum in Lima, Peru. A statement from the regional press group Instituto Prensa y Sociedad (IPYS) said the journalist, who fled to Lima after presidential elections on April 2, is not guaranteed a fair trial in Ecuador, where he faces charges of distributing allegedly confidential emails sent by public officials.

April 18, 2017 4:52 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Maldives

CPJ calls on Maldives to drop case against Raajje TV journalist

New York, April 18, 2017--The Committee to Protect Journalists today called on the Maldives' prosecutor general to drop the legal case against Raajje TV journalist Mohamed Wisam, who was acquitted last month of obstructing police at an anti-government protest in 2015. The prosecutor general lodged an appeal with the high court on April 5.

April 18, 2017 4:34 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Mexico

Mexican crime reporter murdered

A man attaches crosses to the fence of the attorney general's office (PGR) in Mexico City to protest the murder of journalists, April 1, 2017. (Reuters/Edgard Garrido)

Mexico City, April 17, 2017--Mexican authorities should swiftly and credibly investigate the murder of crime reporter Maximino Rodríguez, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Unknown assailants shot and killed Rodríguez on April 14 in the northern Mexican city of La Paz, according to his employer.

April 17, 2017 5:13 PM ET

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Statements   |   Russia

Russian journalist flees Moscow following threats

People lay flowers made of newspapers to pay respects to slain Novaya Gazeta journalist Anna Politkovskaya outside the newspaper's office in Moscow, October 7, 2014. (AP/Ivan Sekretarev)

New York, April 17, 2017--Russian authorities should immediately and thoroughly investigate threats made against Elena Milashina, an investigative journalist for the independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta and a former correspondent for the Committee to Protect Journalists, CPJ said today. In an April 15 interview with The Washington Post, Milashina said that she left Moscow following threats to Novaya Gazeta's staff since she reported earlier this month that gay men were being detained and tortured in Chechnya.

Alerts   |   Belarus

Journalists face trial for covering protests in Belarus

Belarusian police detain a man at a March 25, 2017, protest in Minsk. (AFP/Vasily Maximov)

New York, April 12, 2017--Belarusian authorities should immediately drop all charges against journalists for covering protests and should allow the news media to work unobstructed, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Alerts   |   Venezuela

Journalists covering Venezuela protests harassed, attacked, and news websites blocked

A Reuters photojournalist runs as Venezuelan National Guard soldiers charge during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Caracas on March 31. Several journalists have been injured covering the unrest. (AP/Ariana Cubillos)

New York, April 12, 2017--Venezuelan authorities should ensure that journalists can cover protests safely, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Several reporters have been detained, injured, or had equipment seized while covering ongoing protests over a Supreme Court ruling to strip the opposition-led National Assembly of its lawmaking powers, according to news reports and local press freedom organizations. Access to at least three independent news websites that broadcast footage of the protests is blocked in Venezuela, according to reports.

Blog   |   Egypt

Egypt's state of emergency may act to further silence press

Egypt's President Sisi, pictured in Cairo in March 2017, has declared a state of emergency and said the press needs to be more responsible. (AFP/Khaled Desouki)

Hours after two bombs ripped through packed Palm Sunday services in Coptic Churches in Alexandria and Tanta on April 9, killing nearly 50 people, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi announced a three-month state of emergency. The measure is in many ways an extension of what has already been in place in parts of the Sinai Peninsula since 2014, and a further sign of Sisi's determination to control the flow of information in the country.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 9, 2017

Opposition politicians and press freedom advocates call for the release of journalists jailed in Turkey in an April 9, 2017, protest in Istanbul. (AFP/Yasin Akgul)

Erdoğan vows jailed Die Welt correspondent will never return to Germany
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan last night vowed that Die Welt Turkey correspondent Deniz Yücel, a dual citizen of Germany and Turkey would never be allowed to return to Germany so long as he was president, the online newspaper Diken reported.

Case   |   Brazil

In Brazil, attacker fires at political blogger's car

Political blogger Márcio Prado was at his home in Rio Grande da Serra, one of the municipalities that ring Brazil's biggest city São Paulo, in the early hours of April 1, 2017, when he heard gunshots, he told CPJ in a telephone interview. The blogger said he went downstairs to see what was going on but the streets in front and behind his house were empty and he did not see where the shots came from or who or what the attacker might be shooting at.

Statements   |   Ethiopia

Ethiopia Supreme Court says two Zone 9 bloggers should face incitement charges

Members of the Zone 9 blogging group. (Endalkachew H/Michael)

New York, April 6, 2017--Ethiopia's Supreme Court today ruled that two bloggers from the Zone 9 collective, previously acquitted of terrorism charges, should be tried instead on charges of inciting violence through their writing. If convicted of the charge, Atnaf Berhane and Natnail Feleke would face a maximum prison sentence of 10 years, according to the Addis Standard newspaper.

Blog   |   Brazil

In Brazil, outdated defamation laws and costly court cases used to pressure critics

Brazilian journalist Erik Silva never imagined that printing information from a municipal government website would see him accused of defamation and lead to a drawn-out court case. But almost a year after writing about the size of salary earned by a municipal accountant in Corumbá, a city of just under 100,000 people on Brazil's western border with Bolivia, he is still fighting to clear his name.

Impact

CPJ Highlights: March edition

Standing in solidarity with the U.S. press

In recent months, CPJ has documented charges brought against at least 10 journalists who were covering protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota and Lee County, Iowa. We have consistently called on authorities to drop the charges against the journalists, most recently in a letter sent to the Morton County State's Attorney office in early March. The letter was co-signed by a coalition of free press organizations and others, including representatives from the Native American Journalists Association, Reporters Without Borders, and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.

April 5, 2017 12:29 PM ET

Alerts   |   Libya

AFP photographer repeatedly harassed by Libyan security forces

Libyans attend a candlelit concert in Benghazi to mark "Earth Hour," on March 25, 2017. Security forces have detained AFP photographer Abdullah Doma twice since he covered the event. (AFP/Abdullah Doma)

New York, April 4, 2017--Security forces in Benghazi should stop harassing AFP photojournalist Abdullah Doma and ensure that he can work safely and without fear of reprisal, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. Security forces in the eastern Libyan city have twice detained Doma in the last week, according to AFP and other news reports.

April 4, 2017 4:46 PM ET

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Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 2, 2017

Security forces stand guard atop a building in Istanbul as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan gives a speech in favor of amendments to the constitution that would increase his powers, March 26, 2017. (Reuters/Murad Sezer)

Cumhuriyet journalists respond to indictment

Cumhuriyet journalists Kadri Gürsel and Murat Sabuncu, who were listed in an indictment against the Turkish daily earlier this week, reacted to the accusations presented to the court, online newspaper Demokrat Haber and Cumhuriyet reported yesterday.

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