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  |   Syria

Al-Moutaz Bellah Ibrahim

Ibrahim, a correspondent for the independent Shaam News Network and a freelance reporter, was killed in Tel Abyad, a Syrian town north of the city of Raqqa, on May 4, according to Shaam and the Beirut-based SKeyes Center for Media and Cultural Freedom. Ibrahim was kidnapped by the Islamic State militant group (then called Islamic State in Iraq and Sham) in March, two months before his death, according to news reports and local press groups. His family received his body on May 7, 2014.

A loose coalition of rebel forces captured almost the entire city of Raqqa in March 2013, according to news reports. Since then, Islamic State pushed out other rebel groups and began exerting increased control over the city. By the time of Ibrahim's killing, Raqqa had become the group's de facto headquarters for the vast terrain it controlled.

Ibrahim had reported widely on the presence of Islamist militants in Raqqa in the months before he was kidnapped. His reports included coverage of Islamist militant groups who he said had imposed taxes on Christians and who he said had prevented aid from being delivered to the city.

As part of his work for Shaam News Network, Ibrahim also appeared on the opposition-based TV channels Syria al-Hur and Syria al-Ghad. He also worked for an online campaign called "Raqqa is being slaughtered silently," which posts news and photos of events in Raqqa and has criticized the harsh rule imposed by the Islamic State.

Abu Ibrahim Ar-Raqqawi, a Raqqa citizen who runs the campaign, told the Wall Street Journal that Ibrahim was killed because Islamic State militants caught him with material belonging to the campaign.

Ar-Raqqawi told CPJ that he and Ibrahim would meet in secret repeatedly to share news and information for the campaign because Islamic State had placed media restrictions on journalists covering Raqqa.

Islamic State has imposed restrictions on independent voices and journalists, according to CPJ research. Since the group came to power, it has kidnapped many journalists and raided numerous media centers. Islamic State has also ordered journalists and media workers to pledge allegiance to the group, according to the Syrian Journalists Association. As a result, journalists have fled territories controlled by the group, submitted to self-censorship, or continued their work anonymously at great risk.

May 4, 2014 4:02 PM ET

  |   Américas, Brasil, Colombia, Europa/Ásia Central, México, Oriente Médio / Norte da África, Relatórios, África, Ásia

Crimes sem Castigo

O ĺndice global de Impunidade 2014 do CPJ destaca os países onde os jornalistas são mortos e os assassinos ficam livres

Jornalistas protestam no aniversário de um ano da morte da jornalista Regina Martínez Pérez. Ataques contra a imprensa são tão comuns que as autoridades mexicanas aprovaram uma lei autorizando as autoridades federais a processarem os crimes contra jornalistas. (AP/Felix Marquez)
abril 16, 2014 12:01 AM ET

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  |   Afrique, Asie, Europe & Asie centrale, Les Amériques, Moyen-Orient/Afrique du Nord, Nigeria, Rapports, Somalie

Meurtres de journalistes restés impunis

L'Indice d'impunité du CPJ en 2014 : un rapport qui met en lumière les pays dans lesquels les assassins de journalistes échappent à la justice.

En Somalie, La presse est confrontée à des risques croissants. Sur la photo, les journalistes patientent devant le palais présidentiel. (Reuters/Feisal Omar)
16 avril 2014 0h01 ET

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  |   Américas, Brasil, Colombia, Europa y Asia central, Informes, México, Oriente Medio y África del Norte, África

Eludir los asesinatos

El Índice Global de Impunidad 2014 del CPJ se enfoca en países donde los periodistas son asesinados y los responsables quedan libres

Periodistas protestan en el primer aniversario del asesinato de la periodista Regina Martínez Pérez. Los ataques contra la prensa son tan comunes que las autoridades mexicanas aprobaron una ley que dio mayor jurisdicción a las autoridades federales para enjuiciar crímenes contra periodistas. (AP / Felix Marquez)
16 de Abril 2014 12:01 AM ET

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Français, Português, العربية, English

Reports   |   Afghanistan, Brazil, Colombia, India, Iraq, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Syria

Getting Away With Murder

CPJ’s 2014 Global Impunity Index spotlights countries where journalists are slain and the killers go free

Iraq

Unsolved Murders: 100

Population: 32.6 million

Rank: 1

Somalia

Unsolved Murders: 26

Population: 10.2 million

Rank: 2

The Philippines

Unsolved Murders: 51

Population: 96.7 million

Rank: 3

Sri Lanka

Unsolved Murders: 9

Population: 20.3 million

Rank: 4

Syria

Unsolved Murders: 7

Population: 22.4 million

Rank: 5

Afghanistan

Unsolved Murders: 5

Population: 29.8 million

Rank: 6

Mexico

Unsolved Murders: 16

Population: 120.8 million

Rank: 7

Colombia

Unsolved Murders: 6

Population: 47.7 million

Rank: 8

Pakistan

Unsolved Murders: 22

Population: 179.2 million

Rank: 9

Russia

Unsolved Murders: 14

Population: 143.5 million

Rank: 10

Brazil

Unsolved Murders: 9

Population: 198.7 million

Rank: 11

Nigeria

Unsolved Murders: 5

Population: 168.8 million

Rank: 12

India

Unsolved Murders: 7

Population: 1,237 million

Rank: 13

Impact

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, June 2013

Syrians take shelter at a refugee camp near the border with Turkey. (Reuters/Muhammad Najdet Qadour/Shaam News Network)

CPJ releases report on journalists in exile

Fifty-five journalists fled their homes fearing threats of violence and imprisonment in the past year, according to CPJ's annual survey, which is based on cases the organization has supported, from which it derives global trends. The report, "Journalists in Exile," was released on June 19, ahead of World Refugee Day.

The report found that Iran and Somalia were the top two countries driving out journalists, with nine and eight journalists fleeing, respectively, in the past 12 months. EthiopiaSyriaEritreaMexico, and Sri Lanka are also high on the list of countries from which journalists were forced to flee.

Journalists who CPJ assisted cited fear of violence as the top reason for deciding to leave their countries. Others pointed to threats of imprisonment when asked why they fled into exile. In nearly all of the cases, the journalists moved as a last resort, leaving behind their careers, livelihoods, and families to escape intimidation.

June 26, 2013 4:59 PM ET

  |   Informes, Iran, Oriente Medio y África del Norte, Somalia, Syria, África

Periodistas en el exilio 2012-2013

La violencia obliga a los periodistas somalíes y sirios a marcharse al exilio; se intensifica la represión en Irán

Durante los últimos 12 meses, 55 periodistas huyeron de sus hogares con la ayuda del Comité para la Protección de los Periodistas (CPJ, por sus siglas en inglés). La razón más común para marcharse al exilio fue la amenaza de violencia, como por ejemplo en Somalia y en Siria, dos de las naciones con mayores índices de violencia contra la prensa en todo el mundo. Otros periodistas huyeron ante la amenaza de cárcel, particularmente en Irán, donde el gobierno intensificó la represión en el período previo a las elecciones. Un informe especial del CPJ por Nicole Schilit

Ciudadanos sirios se resguardan en un campo de refugiados cerca de la frontera con Turquía. (Reuters/Muhammad Qadour/Shaam News Network)
19 de Junio 2013 12:01 AM ET

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English, Français, العربية

Reports   |   Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Kenya, Mexico, Rwanda, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Turkey, Uganda

Journalists in exile 2013

Somalis, Syrians flee violence; Iran crackdown deepens

Fifty-five journalists fled their homes in the past year with help from the Committee to Protect Journalists. The most common reason to go into exile was the threat of violence, such as in Somalia and Syria, two of the most deadly countries in the world for the profession. Others fled the threat of prison, especially in Iran, where the government deepened its crackdown ahead of elections. A CPJ special report by Nicole Schilit

Syrians take shelter at a refugee camp near the border with Turkey. (Reuters/Muhammad Najdet Qadour/Shaam News Network)

  |   Syria

Ghaith Abd al-Jawad

Al-Jawad documented clashes and protests for the Qaboun Media Center, a group of opposition citizen journalists who film clashes in the neighborhood of Qaboun and publish the unattributed videos online, according to international broadcaster Al-Jazeera and the local press freedom group Syrian Journalists Association.

Al-Jawad, who was known locally as "Abu Teem," was killed with Amr Badir al-Deen Junaid, the head of the Qaboun Media Center, by a mortar shell fired by pro-Assad forces in Qaboun, according to Shaam News Network and other reports. The Qaboun Media Center posted a video of a shell landing close to one of its other photographers, who was uninjured, on the same day. Qaboun and surrounding neighborhoods on the outskirts of Damascus witnessed intense fighting that day.

There were conflicting reports on the circumstances surrounding al-Jawad's death. The Syrian Journalists Association said al-Jawad was hit while on his way to cover civilians in a makeshift hospital injured by shelling from pro-Assad forces. But Al-Jazeera said he was hit while filming shelling in the area. Neither source provided further details.

The Qaboun Media Center has published hundreds of videos since it established its YouTube account in July 2011. Similar media centers have sprung up all across Syria as citizen journalists and opposition activists document how the unrest has affected their communities. The Qaboun Media Center's videos have been broadcast by local and international news outlets, including the New York Times, Al-Jazeera, and the Daily Mail.

The documentation provided by citizen journalists has been crucial in the international understanding of the Syrian conflict because of extreme government restrictions and danger that prevent widespread news media coverage.

According to Baraa al-Shami, a member of a network of opposition groups in Damascus called the Revolution Leadership Council, al-Jawad had worked for the Qaboun Media center through the uprising and civil war and had filmed battles and protests in the outskirts of suburbs. Pictures of al-Jawad's burial depicted a Qur'an and video camera resting on his body.

March 10, 2013 2:40 PM ET

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