Features & Analysis

  

As ruling party fans spew online abuse, Pakistan’s female journalists call for government action

On August 16, Ramsha Jahangir should have been celebrating a journalistic triumph, the release of a long, deeply reported cover story for the weekend magazine of Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper on the government’s social media strategy and image-building. Instead, she spent the day watching in horror as a torrent of abuse filled her social media feeds. Eventually, she went offline. …

Read More ›

A man is shown in profile against a window holding a camera up to take a photo.

CPJ joins call to revise Nigeria’s draft data protection bill

The Committee to Protect Journalists has joined Paradigm Initiative, a Nigeria-based digital rights group, and the NetRights Coalition of over 100 global civil society groups to submit comments on Nigeria’s draft data protection bill, which is undergoing a public consultation process. The submission said that the bill should “protect those fulfilling their duty as journalists”…

Read More ›

Crimean Tatar civic journalists risk persecution to cover their community in Russian-annexed Crimea

After Russia annexed Crimea in 2014, some Crimean Tatars–the indigenous population of the Crimean peninsula–had to flee for the Kyiv-controlled part of Ukraine. But most have chosen to remain. As the Russian-appointed new authorities established blanket censorship, squeezing out independent media outlets, a new phenomenon emerged–civic journalism. Members of the Crimean Tatar community–who had not…

Read More ›

Lawmakers are shown seated at desks in rows facing a podium and EU flags in a large parliamentary building.

CPJ reminds EU that ‘e-evidence’ rules should protect journalists

CPJ today prompted the European Parliament to safeguard press freedom and human rights in a proposed regulation known as the ‘e-evidence’ proposal, co-signing a letter with European Digital Rights and other digital and media organizations.  CPJ has expressed concern about the lack of safeguards in the proposed Regulation on European Production and Preservation Orders, which…

Read More ›

In an era of global protest, France and Israel stand out for use of dangerous ammunition

With the world gripped in a historic wave of unrest, journalists in no fewer than 65 countries – about a third of the world – have been attacked covering protests since 2015, according to a report I authored for a U.N. agency that was published today. One thing that stood out during my research for the report Safety…

Read More ›

When police patrol protests in military gear, journalists face a hostile reporting environment

When St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer David Carson was covering protests against police violence in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014, he said other reporters often asked him what it was like to get teargassed night after night. These days, he told CPJ, he rarely gets asked that question: “Now all of my journalist friends have been teargassed.” Tear gassings, rubber…

Read More ›

Australia’s journalist union on Facebook, Google, and who should pay for news

Facebook threatened to prevent Australian users and publishers from posting news on its platform last week, raising questions about who benefits when people share journalism on social media—and who has the power to stop them. The company was responding to drafts of a news media bargaining code and related legislation published on July 31 by…

Read More ›

Four press freedom trends to watch amid Belarus’s antigovernment protests

The images coming out of Belarus look like scenes from a blockbuster film: A president clinging to power striding out of a helicopter holding a Kalashnikov assault rifle, while his gun-toting teenage son and heir apparent walks alongside him in a helmet and military vest; the protesters calling for the president’s removal singing songs, playing music, and taking off their…

Read More ›

With colleagues sentenced to prison, Algerian journalists fear their new president’s attitude toward the press

Two weeks after the imprisonment of a high-profile Algerian journalist, a former reporter has been sentenced to prison for his online commentary, cementing fears that Algeria’s new president, Abdelmadjid Tebboune, is on track to match his predecessor’s record of enacting restrictive policies toward the press even as he has promised democratic reforms.    On August 24,…

Read More ›

Belarusian photographer Tatsiana Tkachova quit her state-owned newspaper when it failed to cover violence against protesters

As anti-government protests continue to engulf Belarus after the August 9, 2020 election, there’s a revolt brewing inside some state media outlets, where journalists are striking and quitting over what they see as their employers’ failure to accurately cover the protest movement and the government’s harsh response. Thousands of people have been detained at the demonstrations including…

Read More ›