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Blog   |   Germany

Proposed German legislation threatens broad internet censorship

A German legislator uses a mobile device during a session of the Bundestag in Berlin, March 1, 2013. (AP/Gero Breloer)

The German cabinet on April 5 approved a "Draft Law to Improve Law Enforcement in Social Networks" (Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz), ostensibly aimed at combatting disinformation and hate speech, that raises concerns about restrictions on free expression and the privatization of censorship. The law would compel social media companies to remove content or risk fines as high as 50 million euros. Human rights and press freedom groups, including CPJ, joined several social media companies that have been at the center of the debate over "fake news" and hate speech to express concern over the proposed law.

April 20, 2017 9:53 AM ET

Blog   |   Macedonia

In Macedonia, anti-press rhetoric leaves journalists feeling vulnerable

Election posters for Nikola Gruevski, of Macedonia's VMRO-DPMNE party, in Skopje in December. Gruevski, who is struggling to form a coalition government, accuses critical media of being foreign mercenaries. (AP/Boris Grdanoski)

As the political crisis in Macedonia, triggered by allegations of mass surveillance by intelligence agencies, deepens the environment is increasingly unsafe for journalists who report critically on the ruling Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization-Democratic Party for Macedonian National Unity (VMRO-DPMNE) and its leader, Nikola Gruevski.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 16, 2017

Opposition protesters shout slogans in Istanbul, April 17, 2017. (Reuters/Yagiz Karahan)

Wire reporter jailed
The Supreme Court of Appeals on April 14 upheld the Second Mardin Court for Serious Crimes' November 2016 sentence of two years and four months in prison against Meltem Oktay on charges of "making propaganda for a terrorist organization," the news website Dihaber reported yesterday.

Blog   |   USA

CPJ joins Fly Don't Spy campaign to protect journalists and their sources

(Access Now)

Over the past several months, the Committee to Protect Journalists has raised concerns over U.S. border agents' use of secondary searches of journalists and their devices at U.S. borders, and government proposals to require travelers to hand over social media account passwords as a condition of entry to the U.S. That is why today CPJ joined with 29 organizations to launch the Fly Don't Spy campaign. CPJ supports the rights of journalists to protect confidential information when traveling and is concerned about proposals that could undermine these values.

Blog   |   Egypt

Egypt's state of emergency may act to further silence press

Egypt's President Sisi, pictured in Cairo in March 2017, has declared a state of emergency and said the press needs to be more responsible. (AFP/Khaled Desouki)

Hours after two bombs ripped through packed Palm Sunday services in Coptic Churches in Alexandria and Tanta on April 9, killing nearly 50 people, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi announced a three-month state of emergency. The measure is in many ways an extension of what has already been in place in parts of the Sinai Peninsula since 2014, and a further sign of Sisi's determination to control the flow of information in the country.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 9, 2017

Opposition politicians and press freedom advocates call for the release of journalists jailed in Turkey in an April 9, 2017, protest in Istanbul. (AFP/Yasin Akgul)

Erdoğan vows jailed Die Welt correspondent will never return to Germany
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan last night vowed that Die Welt Turkey correspondent Deniz Yücel, a dual citizen of Germany and Turkey would never be allowed to return to Germany so long as he was president, the online newspaper Diken reported.

Blog   |   Brazil

In Brazil, outdated defamation laws and costly court cases used to pressure critics

Brazilian journalist Erik Silva never imagined that printing information from a municipal government website would see him accused of defamation and lead to a drawn-out court case. But almost a year after writing about the size of salary earned by a municipal accountant in Corumbá, a city of just under 100,000 people on Brazil's western border with Bolivia, he is still fighting to clear his name.

Blog   |   Turkey

Turkey Crackdown Chronicle: Week of April 2, 2017

Security forces stand guard atop a building in Istanbul as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan gives a speech in favor of amendments to the constitution that would increase his powers, March 26, 2017. (Reuters/Murad Sezer)

Cumhuriyet journalists respond to indictment

Cumhuriyet journalists Kadri Gürsel and Murat Sabuncu, who were listed in an indictment against the Turkish daily earlier this week, reacted to the accusations presented to the court, online newspaper Demokrat Haber and Cumhuriyet reported yesterday.

Blog   |   Egypt

As Egypt-U.S. relationship moves forward, jailed Egyptian journalists left behind

A child poses for a picture with a poster of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in Cairo, August 6, 2015, as supporters cheered improvements to the Suez Canal.

Among the things Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi and U.S. President Donald Trump are scheduled to discuss during their April 3 meeting in Washington is Egypt's fight against terrorism. Egypt's government has broadly interpreted this fight to include jailing dozens of journalists, including photographer Abdelrahman Yaqot, who a few days before el-Sisi arrives in Washington will have checked in at the local police station, as he must every month to meet the terms of his release from prison.

Blog   |   Kyrgyzstan

In pivotal election year Kyrgyz media face verbal assaults from president and legal action

President Almazbek Atambayev, pictured at a press conference in 2013. In recent weeks, the Kyrgyz leader verbally assaulted several critical journalists during a speech to foreign ambassadors. (AFP/Vyacheslav Oseldko)

In Kyrgyzstan, once Central Asia's most liberal country, President Almazbek Atambayev is tightening his grip on critical voices, including independent journalists and foreign media.

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