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Blog   |   Mexico

Why the governor of Veracruz should resign

Men carry the casket of murdered photojournalist Ruben Espinosa in Mexico City on August 3, 2015. (AP/Marco Ugarte)

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was originally published, in Spanish, on Univision.com.

The state of Veracruz has become one of the world's most lethal regions for the press. According to research by the Committee to Protect Journalists, when you include the case of Anabel Flores Salazar, whose body was found on Tuesday, at least 12 journalists have been murdered in Veracruz since Javier Duarte de Ochoa become governor in 2010. Three more have disappeared, their whereabouts unknown. Other free expression groups, using different criteria, have documented higher numbers.

Blog   |   Malaysia

Amid financial scandal, Malaysia increases pressure on media

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, standing, has been cleared of wrongdoing, but the independendent media are tenaciously challenging the official narrative. (AP/Joshua Paul)

A financial scandal involving a state investment fund created and overseen by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, exposed in turns by investigative journalists, has put a parallel spotlight on the country's deteriorating press freedom situation. A suggestion by the government's top lawyer to strengthen the 1972 Official Secrets Act to penalize journalists who decline to divulge confidential sources with life imprisonment and judicial caning aims to squelch by threat a stream of official leaks that have sustained the politically sensitive story for the past eight months.

Blog   |   India

'I kept telling them I'm a journalist but they kept beating me': Photographer beaten at Delhi protest

Rahul says he heard police give the order to charge before rushing at students at the Delhi protest. (Rahul M.)

As police cracked down on protesters in Delhi during recent protests over the treatment of Dalits, who occupy the lowest rungs of India's caste ladder, journalists were caught in the fray. The protests were sparked by the suicide of Rohith Vemula, a student who had been barred from halls of residence and parts of campus, according to news reports.

February 9, 2016 11:24 AM ET

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Blog   |   Colombia

Claims police spied on two journalists revive surveillance fears of Colombia's press

When Claudia Morales's six-year-old daughter asks about her mother's bodyguards, the Colombian journalist tells her they are colleagues. "She's too young to understand," Morales, who works for the Bogotá-based Caracol Radio in the city of Armenia, told CPJ in a telephone interview. Vicky Dávila, the news director of LA Fm Radio who also has private security, said that her 14-year-old son is afraid and has asked why they don't leave their home in Bogotá.

Blog   |   Internet

CPJ raises concerns over UN agenda on preventing violent extremism

Preventing and countering violent extremism has been a major issue on the international agenda in the past year, prompting the United Nations Secretary-General to launch a Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism in December and the UN Human Rights Council to adopt a resolution last fall.

Blog   |   Venezuela

Venezuela's national assembly reopens to the press after five-year ban

Journalists gather in the press gallery of Venezuela's National Assembly, after a five-year ban was overturned. (AP/Fernando Llano)

When security guards opened the doors to Venezuela's colonial-era National Assembly building last Wednesday, I was among the dozens of reporters who swarmed inside. Even though the day's legislative session would not be called to order for another three hours, every seat in the press galley, located on the second-floor balcony overlooking the chamber, was quickly occupied.

Blog   |   China

As editor-informant Li Xin disappears, journalists share their experiences with China's security services

Li Xin talks to the AP over Skype in November. The journalist, who says he worked as an informant for Chinese authorities, went missing on January 10. (AP/Saurabh Das)

The case of Li Xin, a journalist who disappeared in Thailand in January after telling the international press in November he had fled China after being forced to work for years as a government informant, has shed light on the pressures some journalists face to provide information to the authorities.

Blog   |   Ecuador

How U.S. copyright law is being used to take down Correa's critics in Ecuador

On December 30, César Ricaurte, the executive director of Fundamedios, received a copyright complaint with the potential to close his entire website. The complaint, filed on behalf of Ecuador's communications regulator SECOM by a company called Ares Rights, ordered the independent press freedom group to remove an image of President Rafael Correa from its website, he told CPJ.

Blog   |   China, Taiwan

We're live from Taipei! Please don't tell China's censors

Tsai Ing-wen, center, declares victory in the presidential election in Taipei on January 16, 2016. (AP/Wally Santana)

Typically, news organizations like to promote original reporting. When an outlet covers a breaking news event at the time and from the place where the event is happening, they want their audience to know. However, for Chinese commercial media that covered this weekend's presidential election in Taiwan, this was apparently not the case.

Blog   |   Syria, Turkey

For journalists fleeing Islamic State, Turkey 'is as dangerous as Syria'

Pictures of filmmaker Naji Jerf are held up at his funeral in Gaziantep in December. Syrian media activists based in Turkey say the murder of Jerf and two other journalists makes the country feels less secure. (STR/AFP)

For the past two years, activists and journalists seeking refuge from Islamic State repression in Raqqa would take sanctuary across the border in southern Turkey, setting up safe houses and offices, and darting back to Syria regularly with camera equipment and other vital supplies. But that sanctuary is now under threat.

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