Viktor Nikulin

5 results arranged by date

Attacks on the Press 2003: Tajikistan

March 11, 2004 12:01 PM ET

The Tajik media continued to be haunted in 2003 by the devastating legacy of the 1992-1997 civil war, which pitted the People's Front, a paramilitary organization led by the current president, Imomali Rakhmonov, against a coalition of Islamic and nationalist...

Read More ›

CPJ requests information on 29 murdered journalists

August 27, 2003 12:00 PM ET

Dear Mr. Imomov: Joel Simon, Josh Friedman, and I appreciated the opportunity to meet with you on July 21 to discuss the Committee to Protect Journalists' (CPJ) list of 29 journalists who were murdered during and after Tajikistan's civil war.

Read More ›

SUSPECTS CONVICTED OF MURDERING TWO JOURNALISTS DURING TAJIKISTAN'S CIVIL WAR

July 29, 2003 12:00 PM ET

New York, July 29, 2003—Tajikistan's Supreme Court today convicted two suspects in the murders of Muhiddin Olimpur, head of the BBC's Persian Service bureau, and Viktor Nikulin, a correspondent with the Russian television network ORT, both of whom were killed...

Read More ›

CPJ DELEGATION CALLS FOR GREATER PRESS ACCESS AND AN END TO IMPUNITY IN TAJIKISTAN

July 24, 2003 12:00 PM ET

Dushanbe, July 24, 2003—A delegation from the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) called on the government of Tajikistan to combat the culture of fear and self-censorship lingering from its bloody 1992-1997 civil war by investigating and prosecuting those responsible for...

Read More ›

CPJ sends letter to foreign minister requesting information on press freedom abuses

May 8, 2002 12:00 PM ET

Your Excellency: Joel Simon and I enjoyed the opportunity to meet with you and Ambassador Rashid Alimov on April 19 to discuss press freedom conditions in Tajikistan. We very much appreciate Your Excellency's commitment to review a letter from us outlining our concerns and a number of press freedom cases we have documented. Unfortunately, government harassment, intimidation, and censorship regularly stifle press freedom in Tajikistan. The political factionalism that erupted during the 1992-1993 civil war, as well as the murders of many journalists killed during the conflict, has lead to widespread self-censorship.

Read More ›