Case   |   USA, Yemen

Cleric's threat forces Seattle cartoonist into hiding

Molly Norris, a political cartoonist for Seattle Weekly, went into hiding in September 2010 because of threats made after her tongue-in-cheek call for an "Everybody Draw Muhammad Day," according to Seattle Weekly. The call was included in a cartoon Norris drew to protest a decision by the cable television network Comedy Central not to broadcast an episode of "South Park" that tested the Islamic taboo against depicting images of the Prophet.

September 30, 2010 4:34 PM ET


Letters   |   Yemen

Yemen should free Shaea, repudiate abuse

Your Excellency: The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on you to ensure the immediate release of Abdulelah Hider Shaea, a Yemeni journalist known for his coverage of Islamist groups, including Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. We also call on you to publicly repudiate the abusive treatment to which Shaea has been subjected while in state custody.

September 23, 2010 3:28 PM ET


Alerts   |   Yemen

Yemeni court gives five journalists suspended jail terms

New York, May 25, 2010—The Sana'a appeal court in Yemen should overturn suspended jail sentences given to an editor and four reporters, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The sentences come just a few days after local media reported that President Ali Abdullah Saleh pardoned all journalists being tried or convicted of press offenses to mark the 20th anniversary of Yemen's unification.

Alerts   |   Yemen

Yemen jails editor in ongoing media onslaught

 New York, May 12, 2010—The Committee to Protect Journalists today called on the Yemeni government to end its campaign of intimidation, violence, and politicized prosecutions against journalists in the wake of yet another prison sentence for a journalist.

Statements   |   Yemen

Muhammad al-Maqaleh released in Yemen

We issued the following statement in response to local and international press reports that Muhammad al-Maqaleh, editor of the Yemeni Socialist Party news Web site Aleshteraki, has been released for what the reports described as “health and humanitarian reasons.” Al-Maqaleh was kidnapped in September 2009 but appeared in government custody in February and alleged that he had been tortured. The release comes one week after CPJ called on President Saleh of Yemen to release a number of journalists who are in custody. At least two other journalists remain in custody...

March 25, 2010 4:31 PM ET


Statements   |   Yemen

CPJ welcomes editor's release in Yemen

We issued the following statement after learning that Hisham Bashraheel, editor of the daily Al-Ayyam, who has been in custody since January 6, was released today for what colleagues described as “health reasons.” The release comes one week after CPJ called on President Saleh of Yemen to release a number of journalists who are in custody but have not been charged with a crime. At least three other journalists remain in government custody...

March 24, 2010 4:54 PM ET


Alerts   |   Yemen

Yemeni reporter who covered reputed crime gang is slain

New York, February 16, 2010—The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the murder on Saturday of Muhammad al-Rabou'e, a Yemeni reporter for the monthly Al-Qahira who wrote several articles about the alleged activities of a reputed criminal group. Al-Jazeera and other news outlets said five individuals burst into Al-Rabou'e home in the district of Beni Qais, in Yemen’s northern province of Hajja, and shot him multiple times.

February 16, 2010 4:50 PM ET


Attacks on the Press   |   Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen

Human rights coverage spreads, despite government pushback

Reports of Egyptian police torture spark protests in Cairo. (Reuters/Mona Sharaf)By Mohamed Abdel Dayem and Robert Mahoney

The media in the Middle East loved the Intifada. Every detail of Israel’s violations of human rights in the late 1980s in the West Bank and Gaza appeared in the Arabic and Farsi press. The governments that owned or controlled these media outlets loved it, too. When pan-Arab satellite television stations emerged in the 1990s, they looped hours of footage of Israeli soldiers and Jewish settlers repressing Palestinians.
February 16, 2010 12:53 AM ET


Attacks on the Press   |   Yemen

Attacks on the Press 2009: Yemen

Top Developments
• Government censors newspapers, establishes new press court.
• Two journalists jailed without charge; one missing after being abducted.

Key Statistic
8: Newspapers banned for periods beginning in May due to their coverage of unrest in the south.

Continuing a steady years-long decline, Yemen became one of the most repressive countries in the region for the press. Journalists covering clashes in the country’s restive south faced severe restrictions. Government repression reached its peak in May, when at least eight newspapers that had covered violent protests were barred from distribution, several papers faced criminal charges, and one paper came under direct attack from state security agents. Government officials established a special court for perceived news media offenses.

February 16, 2010 12:05 AM ET


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