Case   |   Syria

Four French journalists released in Syria

Four French journalists who had been missing in Syria for 10 months were released on April 18, 2014, according to news reports. The journalists returned home in good health on April 20, 2014, the reports said.

Case   |   Spain, Syria

Two Spanish journalists freed from captivity in Syria

Two Spanish journalists were freed after being held captive in Syria for more than six months, according to news reports. The journalists--Javier Espinosa and Ricardo Garcia Vilanova--are back in Spain, according to news sources

Media Advisories   |   Syria

Syria, the most dangerous place for journalists

Three-year anniversary of the Syrian uprising

New York, March 13, 2014--Syria ranks as the most dangerous country in the world for journalists, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Since the start of the bloody uprising against President Bashar al-Assad, at least 65 journalists have been killed, more than 80 have been abducted, and approximately 30 are still missing. According to CPJ's most recent prison census, 12 journalists remain behind bars.

CPJ experts are available in New York for interviews in Arabic and English in the lead-up to and on the day of the anniversary.

March 13, 2014 5:08 PM ET

Alerts   |   Canada, Syria

Two journalists killed in two days in Syria

New York, March 10, 2014--Two journalists were killed over the weekend while covering the conflict in Syria, the deadliest country for the press.

Attacks on the Press   |   Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Liberia, Pakistan, Poland, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, UK, Uganda

Putting Press Freedom at the Heart of Anti-Poverty Efforts

Economists and political scientists acknowledge that journalism is vital to development and democracy. By Robert Mahoney

Pakistani investigative journalist Umar Cheema has exposed corruption in Parliament. (AFP/Aamir Qu)

Attacks on the Press   |   Bangladesh, China, Ecuador, Egypt, Liberia, Russia, Syria, Turkey, UK, USA, Vietnam, Zambia

CPJ Risk List

Surveillance, restrictive Internet legislation, and cyberattacks compel CPJ to add cyberspace to the list of places trending in the wrong direction. By Maya Taal

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood try to push a journalist, center, away from the police academy where ousted President Mohamed Morsi was on trial on the outskirts of Cairo, November 4, 2013. Perhaps nowhere did press freedom decline more dramatically in 2013 than in polarized Egypt. (Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

Attacks on the Press   |   Syria

Syrian Journalists Strive to Report, Despite Shifting Dangers

They call themselves citizen journalists, media workers, or media activists. Amid the chaos of conflict, they are determined to gather and distribute the news. By María Salazar-Ferro

Journalists Bryn Karcha, center, of Canada, and Toshifumi Fujimoto, right, of Japan, run for cover with an unidentified fixer in Aleppo's district of Salaheddine on December 29, 2012. (Reuters/Muzaffar Salman)
Journalists Bryn Karcha, center, of Canada, and Toshifumi Fujimoto, right, of Japan, run for cover with an unidentified fixer in Aleppo's district of Salaheddine on December 29, 2012. (Reuters/Muzaffar Salman)

Attacks on the Press   |   Syria

Attacks on the Press in 2013: Syria

For the second year in a row, CPJ ranked Syria the deadliest country in the world for journalists. Journalists also faced new threats in 2013 as radical Islamist groups strengthened their influence in rebel-held territory and rebel groups saw increased infighting. An unprecedented number of journalists were abducted during the year; many of them were believed to be held by the Al-Qaeda affiliate Islamic State of Iraq and Sham. But the blame did not fall solely with extremist groups. Armed factions affiliated with both the regime and the rebels were implicated in anti-press violations including detention and killing. Throughout the year, as the groups succeeded in silencing dissenting voices with complete impunity, fewer journalists were willing to take on the risks of reporting from Syria. Many international journalists refused to enter the country, and local journalists fled into exile, fearing for their lives.

February 12, 2014 1:02 AM ET

Statements   |   Sweden, Syria, Turkey

Three abducted journalists released in Syria

New York, January 8, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the news that three abducted journalists in Syria have been freed this week. The Swedish Foreign Ministry confirmed today that freelance Swedish journalists Magnus Falkehed and Niclas Hammarstrom, both of whom were abducted in November, were released. On Sunday, Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu said Turkish intelligence services had helped secure the release of Milliyet photojournalist Bünyamin Aygün, who had been held for more than a month.


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