Europe & Central Asia

2003

Romania

Attacks on the Press 2002: Romania

Government officials, wary of any media coverage that could potentially threaten the country's efforts to join NATO and the European Union, used threats and intimidation to promote docile reporting--resulting in increased self-censorship in 2002.
March 31, 2003 12:03 PM ET

Tags:

Russia

Attacks on the Press 2002: Russia

Russian president Vladimir Putin, along with his coterie of conservative former intelligence officials, pressed ahead in 2002 to impose his vision of a "dictatorship of the law" in Russia to create a "managed democracy." Putin's goal of an obedient and patriotic press meant that the Kremlin continued using various branches of the state apparatus to rein in the independent media.

Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, UK, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia

Attacks on the Press 2002: Slovenia

Press freedom is generally respected in Slovenia, but journalists investigating sensitive issues continue to face occasional intimidation or pressure in retaliation for their coverage.
March 31, 2003 12:02 PM ET

Tags:

Tajikistan

Attacks on the Press 2002: Tajikistan

The devastating legacy of the civil war (1992-1997) between President Imomali Rakhmonov's government and various opposition parties for control over the country continued to haunt the Tajik media in 2002. Because of widespread poverty--a result of the war and a subsequent string of natural disasters--reporters often work in run-down offices with outdated equipment. Only a small fraction of the population can access or afford the Internet. Moreover, the media community remains small, since many of the country's leading journalists either fled during the civil war or perished in it. (Tens of thousands died during the conflict, including at least 24 journalists.) Scarred by the violent murders of their colleagues, many journalists heavily censor themselves to avoid retribution. And the government's failure to effectively investigate cases of murdered journalists only deepens the press' sense of insecurity.
March 31, 2003 12:01 PM ET

Tags:

Turkey

Attacks on the Press 2002: Turkey

In November, the Islamist-oriented Justice and Development Party won parliamentary elections in Turkey. The new prime minister, Abdullah Gul, and influential party head Recep Tayyip Erdogan affirmed that joining the European Union would be a top government priority. To that end, they promised greater democratic reform, including an easing of long-standing restrictions on freedom of expression that remain in place despite changes implemented by the outgoing government of Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit.
March 31, 2003 12:01 PM ET

Tags:

Turkmenistan

Attacks on the Press 2002: Turkmenistan

The magnitude of President Saparmurat Niyazov's cult of personality might even astonish the Soviet tyrant Joseph Stalin. A golden statue in Turkmenistan's capital, Ashgabat, honors Niyazov, who is called "Turkmenbashi," or "the Father of All Turkmen," and his portrait graces the country's currency. In 2002, Niyazov's birthday was declared a national holiday, and he renamed the months of the year, dubbing January "Turkmenbashi" in his own honor.
March 31, 2003 12:01 PM ET

Ukraine

Attacks on the Press 2002: Ukraine

During 2002, President Leonid Kuchma's relationship with the United States hit an all-time low over suspicions that he sold a sophisticated radar system to Iraq. At home, his presidency was threatened by court rulings that opened a criminal case against him (and that were later overturned) for alleged involvement in the 2000 murder of journalist Georgy Gongadze. Increasingly isolated, Kuchma lashed out at critics in the press.

Attacks on the Press   |   Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mauritania, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, UAE, Yemen

Attacks on the Press 2002: United Arab Emirates

In the autocratic city-states that comprise the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), local media face both the promise of new technology and the burdens of long-standing state restrictions.
March 31, 2003 12:00 PM ET

Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, UK, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia

Attacks on the Press 2002: United Kingdom

Press freedom is generally respected in the United Kingdom, but CPJ was alarmed by a legal case in which Interbrew, a Belgium-based brewing group, and the British Financial Services Authority (FSA), a banking and investment watchdog agency, demanded that several U.K. media outlets turn over documents that had been leaked to them. The case threatened to erode the media's ability to protect sources, and to deter whistle-blowers from talking with the press.
March 31, 2003 12:00 PM ET

2003

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 or all
« Previous Page   Next Page »
« 2002 | 2004 »