Togo / Africa

Journalists attacked in Togo since 1992

  
A billboard of President Faure Gnassingbe is seen in Lome, Togo, on February 19, 2020. CPJ recently joined a letter calling for the Togolese government to maintain internet access throughout the upcoming election. (Reuters/Luc Gnago)

CPJ joins letter calling on Togo government not to shut down internet

The Committee to Protect Journalists joined 27 other press freedom and human rights organizations in a letter dated February 19 calling for authorities in Togo to maintain the stability and openness of the internet and social media platforms.

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Togolese journalists at Saturday's protest. (Sylvio Combey)

Togo journalists protest purported security threats

Dozens of Togolese journalists marched in the capital, Lomé, on Saturday to call attention to reported allegations that government security agents planned to retaliate against critical reporters. The allegations themselves are in dispute–the government called them “fabricated”–but they are set against a recent U.N. report expressing concern over the official use of arbitrary detention and…

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Didier Ledoux snapped this photo minutes before Lt. Colonel Romuald Létondot, seen here, confronted him. (Courtesy Didier Ledoux)

French officer proves ‘allergic’ to photos in Togo

It has been a week since Togolese photojournalist Komi Agbedivlo, better known as “Didier Ledoux,” was verbally abused by a military officer from France as he covered a political demonstration in the capital, Lome. The incident might have gone unnoticed, if not for social media and a year charged with historical symbolism for Togo, which is celebrating 50 years of independence from France. So the…

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The author in the studios of TVT in 1976. (TVT)

Togo’s press suffers malaise 50 years after independence

In the year marking the 50th anniversary of Togo’s independence, the Togolese press is suffering from an obvious malaise—a malaise perceived by the informed citizen and not by communications professionals themselves. This malaise transpires in the daily practice of journalism through the lack of professionalism. If elsewhere the media is stifled under the heel of…

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Angolan police escort the Togolese team bus in the aftermath of the deadly attack. (Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

In Angola, censorship shrouds journalist’s killing

On January 8, while Angola was hosting the African Cup of Nations, the country made worldwide headlines after a deadly attack on the Togolese national soccer team, which left a coach and a journalist dead. With international attention turning to the story, a shroud of state censorship and self-censorship by the Angolan media obscured the…

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