Katherine Jacobsen

Katherine Jacobsen is CPJ's U.S. and Canada program coordinator. Before joining CPJ as a news editor in 2017, Jacobsen worked for The Associated Press in Moscow and as a freelancer in Ukraine, where her writing appeared in outlets including Businessweek, U.S. News and World Report, Foreign Policy, and Al-Jazeera.

Seeking ‘answers and accountability’: Reporters cover Uvalde shooting amid police obstruction

False narratives, threats of arrest, and a biker group blocking access. These are just a few of the challenges journalists have faced while covering the aftermath of the May 24 shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Threats to press freedom are hardly the main story in Uvalde, where police failed to stop the…

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As Russia’s war in Ukraine drags on, Ukrainian journalists get help from Polish colleagues 

On a recent April morning in Warsaw, Joanna Krawczyk was sitting inside a café in the city center, her phone pinging nonstop. The head of Wyborcza Foundation, a Polish media support initiative, Krawczyk was fielding messages from colleagues coordinating the passage of a truckload of reporting equipment from Poland to Ukraine.  “It’s like a rotating menu…

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Many journalists in exile have to leave the profession. This one saved a local Canadian newspaper

When reporters flee their home countries, many are forced to leave the profession after finding few opportunities in journalism and facing other pressures in exile. CPJ recently spoke with a Pakistani refugee reporter who not only stayed in journalism, but saved a local newspaper in his adopted country, Canada. In 2002, Mohsin Abbas was a…

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‘Censor yourself or don’t work at all’: Why squeezed Russian journalists are fleeing in droves

Last week, Taisia Bekbulatova, chief editor of Russian independent news site Holod, began frantically looking for plane tickets. Bekbulatova, who is based in Georgia, wanted to evacuate her Russia-based staff after the country passed legislation threatening up to 15 years in prison for the publication of “fake” information about the invasion of Ukraine.  “It was apparent that the law was…

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‘There will be more repression’: Exiled Russian journalist Irina Borogan on Moscow’s censorship of Ukraine invasion

As the Russian military continues its invasion of Ukraine, the Kremlin is also fighting a different kind of battle at home in its attempts to quash independent news coverage and dissenting narratives about the attack it launched on February 24. Across Russia, journalists have been detained and their outlets investigated, blocked, and restricted from using social media. On…

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The view from Ukraine, through the eyes of local journalists

Updated March 8, 2022 More than two million Ukrainians have fled as Russia continues missile and artillery attacks on Ukraine’s cities. At least one Ukrainian journalist has been killed in the fighting, as the Ukrainian media reports amid rockets, misinformation, and the threat of online attacks.  CPJ rounded up some of the most poignant commentary…

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CPJ calls on US Justice Department to stop compelling media outlets to register as foreign agents

On February 11, 2022, the Committee to Protect Journalists submitted comments to the United States Department of Justice concerning problems presented by labeling media organizations as “foreign agents” under the Foreign Agents Registration Act. The comments were submitted to the Justice Department in response to a public request from the department for feedback on proposed…

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Iowa, Kansas lawmakers bar media from Senate floors, stymieing newsgathering

Lawmakers’ whispers, eyerolls, and other hints about the course of debate are no longer visible to journalists covering the state Senates in Kansas and Iowa.   In a break with decades of precedent, journalists in both states have been barred from the Senate floors, instead relegated to designated media galleries upstairs. Mike Pirner, communications director…

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Former Capital Gazette editor on justice and healing after worst newsroom shooting in U.S. history

When CPJ interviewed Rick Hutzell at a café in Annapolis, Maryland, in July, he acknowledged that the decision to open up about his experiences as the former editor of the Capital Gazette, the site of the worst newsroom shooting in U.S. history, was a shift. Hutzell had been wary of giving interviews in the three…

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Capital Gazette shooter found criminally responsible, while questions of justice linger

In a county courthouse in Annapolis, Maryland, a scaled model of the old Capital Gazette newsroom was perched at an angle on a table toward the jury. One by one, four reporters, a photojournalist, and an advertising sales representative, approached the model to show where they were sitting when a loud noise — some thought it was a…

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