Attacks on the Press in 2008

Attacks on the Press in 2008: Morocco

February 10, 2009 12:22 AM ET

Morocco continued to backslide on press freedom as independent journalists and news outlets were targeted in a series of politicized court cases. In May, the National Syndicate for Moroccan Press noted a "dangerous trend" in which authorities were "imposing exaggerated fines in defamation cases, resorting to preventive arrest of journalists...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Nepal

February 10, 2009 12:21 AM ET

Nepal made a historic shift in 2008 from a monarchy to a coalition-ruled democratic republic under the leadership of a former Maoist guerrilla. Journalists’ uncertainty about the ex-rebel leader’s newfound legitimacy was apparent as they struggled to find a way to refer to him in print. Most hedged their bets...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Niger

February 10, 2009 12:20 AM ET

With a simmering insurgency in the north, a split within the ruling government, and talk of a constitutional amendment to allow President Mamadou Tandja to run for a third term in 2009, authorities increasingly tightened restrictions on the press. The high-profile imprisonment of Moussa Kaka, a reporter well known for...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Pakistan

February 10, 2009 12:19 AM ET

Military leader Pervez Musharraf resigned as president in August under threat of impeachment, leaving a decidedly mixed legacy on press freedom. As his power waned in late 2007, Musharraf shut down all independent broadcasters for a time and then tried to impose a rigid “code of conduct” on the stations....

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Philippines

February 10, 2009 12:18 AM ET

Four years after President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo moved to create a police task force dedicated to investigating journalist murders, CPJ research showed the impunity rate in these cases remained about 90 percent, one of the highest in the world. A CPJ study into slain journalists worldwide found that the absence of...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Russia

February 10, 2009 12:17 AM ET

When Vladimir Putin's handpicked successor, Dmitry Medvedev, won 68 percent of the vote in Russia's presidential election March 2, many saw in the new leader a moderate technocrat who might liberalize the country's press policies. In his May 7 inauguration speech, Medvedev declared that the protection of human rights and...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Rwanda

February 10, 2009 12:16 AM ET

On paper, Rwanda had more private newspapers and radio stations than at any point in its history. In practice, independent news coverage was minimal due to business woes and government intimidation. One critical editor was forced to flee the country, and a second was deported. Legislation pending in late year...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Senegal

February 10, 2009 12:15 AM ET

Conditions deteriorated in Senegal, once considered a haven for press freedom. With contemptuous rhetoric, threats, physical violence, and criminal prosecutions, supporters of President Abdoulaye Wade and members of his government retaliated against critical journalists. The June 21 beating of two sports journalists covering a World Cup qualifying match in Dakar...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Serbia

February 10, 2009 12:14 AM ET

Nationalists suffered a series of political defeats in 2008 and responded by lashing out against independent journalists and liberal reformers with threats and physical attacks. A reformist-nationalist coalition government led by the conservative Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica during the first half of the year and by liberal President Boris Tadic...

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Attacks on the Press in 2008: Somalia

February 10, 2009 12:13 AM ET

Anarchic violence gripped a nation sadly accustomed to chaos and suffering as a weak federal government sought to fend off insurgencies in the south and central parts of the country. Two reporters were killed in the southern port city of Kismayo in 2008, continuing a national pattern of violence against...

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