Alerts   |   Myanmar

Burmese government allows dailies to resume publishing

Customers buy weekly news journals at a roadside shop in Yangon, Myanmar, Friday. Authorities said they will allow private daily newspapers starting in April for the first time since 1964. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

New York, December 28, 2012--Burmese authorities' decision to allow private daily newspapers to resume publication is a welcome change to a policy that has stifled press freedom in the country for decades, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Letters   |   Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand, USA

Obama should address media rights in Southeast Asia

Dear President Obama: We are pleased that you will begin your second term as U.S. president with a trip to Southeast Asia. As you visit Burma, Cambodia, and Thailand from November 17 through 20 while attending the 21st Association of Southeast Asian Nations Summit and related meetings in Phnom Penh, we hope that your commitment to human rights and the fundamental right to free expression remains an important aspect of your agenda.

Alerts   |   Myanmar

Burma ends pre-publication censorship; harsh laws remain

Two men chat at a roadside weekly journal shop in Rangoon on Monday. Burma's government said it would abolish the practice of censoring publications before they are printed. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

Bangkok, August 20, 2012--Burma should dismantle its censorship agency and repeal all laws that continue to allow suppression of news in the name of national security, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The government announced today that it would abolish pre-publication censorship, a step CPJ welcomes but considers a partial measure in addressing the country's restrictive practices.

Alerts   |   Myanmar

Burmese authorities suspend two news publications

Two weekly news publications have been suspended indefinitely in Burma. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

Bangkok, August 1, 2012--Two weekly news publications were suspended indefinitely in Burma on Tuesday, marking a significant reversal of the government's earlier loosening of media restrictions and pre-publication censorship, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Attacks on the Press   |   Myanmar

Attacks on the Press in 2011: Burma

Burma's news media remained among the most restricted in the world, despite the transition from military to civilian rule and President Thein Sein's vow to adopt a more liberal approach. The Press Scrutiny and Registration Department reviewed all local news journals prior to publication, censoring a vast array of topics. Criticism of the government and military was forbidden, although censors allowed more coverage of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and some political and economic topics. Authorities exercised control with a vengeance: The nation was still among the world's worst jailers of the press. Exile-run media continued to fill the news gap, but at a high cost: At least five undercover reporters for exile media were imprisoned. Regulations adopted in May banned the use of flash drives and VoIP communication services in Internet cafés.

February 21, 2012 12:14 AM ET

Alerts   |   Myanmar

In mass amnesty, nine journalists released in Burma

Burmese online journalist Nay Phone Latt is one of nine journalists released in a mass amnesty today. The journalist, 28, had been sentenced to 20 and a half years in prison. (AFP/Soe Than Win)

Bangkok, January 13, 2012--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the release of nine journalists who were freed as part of a mass release of at least 600 political prisoners in Burma on Friday, but calls on President Thein Sein to release reporters still being held in detention and to implement press reforms that would end the country's repressive media environment.

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