Myanmar

2011

Alerts   |   Myanmar

Blogger released in mass amnesty in Burma

The Burmese comedian and blogger known as Zarganar arrives at the Yangon international airport Wednesday. (AP)

Bangkok, October 12, 2011 - The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes today's release of Burmese blogger and comedian Maung Thura, but reiterates its call for the immediate and unconditional release of at least 13 other journalists on CPJ's imprisoned list.

October 12, 2011 9:57 AM ET

Tags:

Alerts   |   Myanmar

Burmese journalist given additional 10-year sentence

Bangkok, September 15, 2011--The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the 10-year jail sentence handed down to Burmese journalist Sithu Zeya, a photographer with the Norway-based, exile-run Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB), and calls on the government to reverse the ruling and stop its retaliation against exile-affiliated journalists.

September 15, 2011 1:11 PM ET

Tags:

Alerts   |   Myanmar

Australian editor convicted, released in Burma

In this June 2007 photo, Ross Dunkley poses with narcotics to be destroyed in Burma. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

Bangkok, July 1, 2011--Ross Dunkley, founder and editor of the Myanmar Times newspaper, was convicted of assault and set free for time already spent in detention by a Burmese court on Thursday. 

July 1, 2011 2:57 PM ET

Tags:

Alerts   |   Australia, Myanmar

Australian editor released on bail, faces trial in Burma

New York, March 29, 2011--Ross Dunkley, founder and editor of the Myanmar Times weekly newspaper, was released on bail from a Burmese prison today, according to international news reports. Dunkley, an Australian citizen arrested February 10 amid tense negotiations over the future of the weekly, had been denied several earlier requests for release on bail. 

March 29, 2011 12:31 PM ET

Tags:

Attacks on the Press   |   Afghanistan, China, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam

Attacks on the Press 2010: Asia Analysis

Partisan Journalism and the Cycle of Repression

With journalists in their midst, police and protesters clash in Bangkok. (Reuters/Chaiwat Subprasom)

by Bob Dietz and Shawn W. Crispin

Lal Wickramatunga's family and publishing house, Leader Publications, have paid dearly in Sri Lanka's highly charged political climate. While Leader's newspapers, including the weekly Sunday Leader, are widely known for tough, independent reporting, they have been caught up in a partisan media environment, one filled with violence and censorship. Wickramatunga's brother has been murdered, his company has been sued, and his journalists face intimidation.

Attacks on the Press   |   Myanmar

Attacks on the Press 2010: Burma

Top Developments
• Junta bars foreign reporters, censors speech prior to national election.
• Aung San Suu Kyi freed, but government still jails journalists, critics.

Key Statistic
13: Journalists imprisoned as of December 1, the fourth‐highest figure in the world.


After nearly five decades of uninterrupted military rule, Burma moved toward an uncertain new era in November when it staged national elections and freed the pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The new parliament, although dominated by the military junta's chosen candidates, was the first civilian government in the country since 1962. Military leaders, notorious for their international isolation, sought international legitimacy through the election. "But the vote was so rigged, it had the opposite effect," The Washington Post noted in an editorial. "Rules were written so that, no matter how people voted, the military would retain control; but even so, the regime could not resist Election Day intimidation and ballot-box stuffing."

February 15, 2011 12:43 AM ET

Alerts   |   Australia, Myanmar

Australian publisher detained in Burma

In this June 2007 photo, Ross Dunkley poses with narcotics to be destroyed in Burma. Dunkley is currently being held on immigration charges. (AP/Khin Maung Win)

Bangkok, February 14, 2011--The Committee to Protect Journalists is concerned that authorities have detained Ross Dunkley, editor-in-chief and chief executive officer of the Myanmar Times newspaper, on immigration-related charges in Burma.  

February 14, 2011 12:55 PM ET

Tags:

Alerts   |   Myanmar

Burmese video journalist given 13 years in jail

New York, February 11, 2011--Burma's new government under Prime Minister Thein Sein must put an end to the former military junta's despicable policy of imprisoning independent journalists, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. The most recent case to come to light is the 13-year sentencing of Maung Maung Zeya in a trial held within Insein Prison on February 4. Staff at the Oslo-based Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB), for which the journalist worked, confirmed the decision to CPJ. Maung Maung Zeya was convicted for contacting Burmese exiled media and violating the Electronics Act. The court's sentence came on the same day Thein Sein was sworn into office. 

February 11, 2011 4:27 PM ET

Tags:

« 2010 | 2012 »