Thein Sein

23 results arranged by date

Letters   |   Burma, USA

Obama: Burma must improve its media environment

Dear President Obama: The Committee to Protect Journalists is writing to express its deep concern about the recent killing, jailing, and harassment of journalists in Burma. During your upcoming visit to the country on November 11-12, we urge you to impress upon Burmese President Thein Sein that future U.S. engagement will be predicated on a renewed and genuine commitment to press freedom.

Alerts   |   Burma

Burma's Irrawaddy threatened, hit by cyberattacks

Bangkok, October 3, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists strongly condemns recent threats and cyberattacks against The Irrawaddy, an independent media group dedicated to Burma news and analysis.

Alerts   |   Burma

In a growing clampdown, three editors detained in Burma

Bangkok, July 23, 2014--Burmese authorities should drop national security-related charges brought against journalists and staff members of the Bi Mon Te Nay (Bi-Midday Sun) news journal, and release them from pre-trial detention immediately, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Alerts   |   Burma

Burma takes another step toward repressing its media

New York, July 10, 2014--Donor countries should bring diplomatic pressure on Burma's government and reconsider their economic support for the country following Thursday's sentencing of four journalists of a magazine and the publication's chief executive to 10 years of hard labor in prison, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Alerts   |   Burma

Burma deports Australian reporter covering protests

New York, May 8, 2014--An Australian journalist covering protests in Burma was deported by authorities today, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the move.

Alerts   |   Burma

Amid rising repression, Burmese journalist given jail term

Bangkok, April 7, 2014--A Burmese journalist was sentenced to one year in prison today on charges of "trespassing" and "disturbing an on-duty civil servant" while reporting a news story, according to local reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists calls for the verdict to be overturned on appeal. 

Letters   |   Burma

Passage of Burma media bill would reverse free press gains

Dear President Thein Sein: We are writing to express our concern about shrinking press freedom in Burma and urge you to veto media legislation that was passed this month by your country's parliament. The bill, which awaits your signature, maintains a censorship role for state authorities and threatens to reverse several of the gains achieved to date under your democratic reform program.

Blog   |   Burma

Burma clampdown gathers pace as legislation passed

In a clear step backwards for press freedom in Burma, new legislation will give the government censorship powers and the sole authority to issue and revoke news publication licenses. While the legislation enshrines into law broad press freedom guarantees, specific provisions will give the Ministry of Information ultimate power over what news is permissible for publication.

Reports   |   Burma

Burma falters, backtracks on press freedom

The media landscape in Burma is more open than ever, as President Thein Sein releases imprisoned journalists and abolishes the former censorship regime. But many threats and obstacles to truly unfettered reporting remain, including restrictive laws held over from the previous military regime. The wider government’s commitment to a more open reporting environment is in doubt. A CPJ special report by Shawn W. Crispin

Villagers protest a copper mine project in the Latpadaung region in March 2013. (Reuters/Soe Zeya Tun)

Reports   |   Burma

Online and in danger in Burma

Early moves by Thein Sein to ease Internet censorship are viewed as a limited concession to press freedom, since Burma has one of the lowest Internet penetration rates in the world. Now, planned foreign investments in mobile infrastructure promise to expand access, but a draft telecommunications law would leave intact many of the vague legal restrictions used to curb online freedoms in the past. By Shawn W. Crispin

Burmese citizens use an Internet café in Rangoon. The country has one of the lowest Internet penetration rates in the world. (AFP)

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