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The most repressive nations use imprisonment, Internet restrictions, and other tactics to censor the press. Eritrea and North Korea top the list. PortuguêsEspañolالعربيةFrançaisРусский

Alerts   |   Vietnam

Vietnamese editor faces anti-state charges for reporting on corruption

Bangkok, May 13, 2015--Authorities in Vietnam today levied anti-state charges against a former news editor who published reports on official corruption, according to news reports. The accusations mark a trend of legal harassment against journalists who probe sensitive corruption issues in Vietnam, the Committee to Protect Journalists said.

May 13, 2015 10:14 AM ET

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Impact   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, China, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Latvia, Myanmar, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam

News from the Committee to Protect Journalists, April 2015

CPJ launches annual publication Attacks on the Press


At a U.N. press conference on April 27 to launch CPJ's annual publication Attacks on the Press, CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon called on the U.N. Security Council to include in its May 27 debate on Journalist Safety a warning to states that they should not use national security as an excuse to jail, harass, or censor journalists.

The last three years have been the most deadly for the press, according to CPJ research. One of the reasons is the developing "terror dynamic"--non-state actors targeting journalists with violence while governments restrict civil liberties and press freedom in response. This phenomenon was amply documented in essays published in this year's edition of Attacks on the Press.

The book, which emphasizes reporting and analysis by CPJ staff and outside experts, features essays on multiple threats facing the press: the conflict in Syria, where freelancers and local journalists must adapt to an environment in which they are targets; terror and criminal groups, in countries as Syria, Nigeria, and Mexico, which document their own atrocities and disseminate them through social media; and crackdowns on the press in Ethiopia and Egypt, where governments use the threat of terror to justify repression. Several essays in the book also look at the impact of surveillance in more democratic societies, including those in Europe. The book also includes CPJ's list of the 10 Most Censored Countries.

The print edition of Attacks on the Press is published by Bloomberg Press, an imprint of Wiley, and is available for purchase.

May 7, 2015 4:24 PM ET

Attacks on the Press   |   China, Cuba, Eritrea, Hungary, Iran, Poland, South Africa, Sudan, Syria, Vietnam

Journalists overcome obstacles through crowdfunding and determination

The rubble of a school bombed by the Sudanese government in 2012. To set up a news agency to cover the conflict, humanitarian worker Ryan Boyette used crowdfunding. (AP/Ryan Boyette)

During South Africa's Boer War, at the turn of the 20th century, a determined news organization relocated reporters, copy editors, and printing presses to the front line to ensure accurate reporting. In the Warsaw Ghetto, during World War II, a literal underground press, established to counter Nazi propaganda, required the nightly movement of cumbersome printing equipment to evade capture.

Blog   |   Vietnam

In Vietnam, arrests dash hopes that crackdown on bloggers will end

Protesters in Hanoi hold up pictures of jailed bloggers and activists in May 2014. Hopes that authorities would end the repression of bloggers have faded with the arrest of three more writers. (Reuters/Nguyen Huu Vinh)

What one hand gives, the other takes in Vietnam. Last October's early release of jailed blogger Nguyen Van Hai, more commonly known as Dieu Cay, has proven to be an anomaly as authorities have subsequently ramped up their repression of other independent bloggers.

Reports   |   Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Cameroon, Cuba, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Mexico, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Vietnam

China is world's worst jailer of the press; global tally second worst on record

More than 200 journalists are imprisoned for their work for the third consecutive year, reflecting a global surge in authoritarianism. China is the world’s worst jailer of journalists in 2014. A CPJ special report by Shazdeh Omari

An Egyptian protester calls for the release of freelance photographer Mahmoud Abou Zeid, also known as Shawkan, who has been imprisoned since August 2013. (AP/Amr Nabil)

Alerts   |   Vietnam

Blogger detained in Vietnam amid clampdown on dissent

Bangkok, December 8, 2014--Nguyen Quang Lap was detained on Saturday by police in Ho Chi Minh City, the second blogger to be arrested in as many weeks in Vietnam, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the mounting crackdown on dissent and calls for the immediate release of all journalists held behind bars in Vietnam.

Alerts   |   Vietnam

Vietnamese blogger detained on anti-state charges

Bangkok, December 2, 2014--An independent blogger was detained in Vietnam on Saturday on anti-state charges for online postings deemed critical of the government, according to news reports. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the arrest and calls on Vietnam's government to cease its campaign of persecution against journalists and bloggers.

Alerts   |   Vietnam

Vietnamese blogger 'Mother Mushroom' fears arrest for Facebook activity

New York, November 7, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is greatly concerned about the safety of Vietnamese blogger Nguyen Ngoc Nhu Quynh, who has been repeatedly questioned by local police in Nha Trang about her activity on Facebook, and says that she fears arrest. Vietnam currently imprisons 17 journalists, most of them bloggers, according to CPJ research.

Statements   |   Vietnam

CPJ welcomes release of Vietnamese prisoner Nguyen Van Hai

New York, October 21, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is pleased by the release from prison of Vietnamese blogger Nguyen Van Hai, who is also known by the name of his blog, "Dieu Cay," and who had been jailed since April 2008.

October 21, 2014 6:15 PM ET
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