India

Road to justice: Breaking cycle of impunity

Despite increased international attention to the murders of journalists, governments fail to take action to reduce the high rates of targeted violence and impunity, the Committee to Protect Journalists finds. In the past 10 years, 370 journalists were murdered; in 90 percent of cases, there are no convictions. The unchecked, unsolved murders of journalists is one of the greatest threats to press freedom today.
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Attacks on the Press   |   India

Indian businesses exert financial muscle to control press

A man reads a newspaper in front of closed shops along the roadside in Delhi, India, on October 10, 2014. (Reuters/Ahmad Masood)

In the late summer of 2014, Indian freelance journalist Keya Acharya found herself embroiled in her own version of the War of the Roses. That August, Acharya was forced to respond to a nine-page legal notice demanding that she pay a staggering 1 billion rupees ($16.3 million) to a company whose owner was upset about her article on India's lucrative rose industry.

Blog   |   India

Five-day ban for Al-Jazeera in India, one year after map error

Viewers wanting to watch Al-Jazeera in India this week are greeted with a message, above, explaining the news outlet has been banned for five days. (AFP/Chandan Khanna)

On Wednesday, Al-Jazeera was forced off the air in India after the government demanded the Qatar-based news broadcaster be suspended for five days for broadcasting images of maps between 2013 and 2014 that did not display Pakistan-controlled Kashmir as separate territory.

April 23, 2015 4:48 PM ET

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Blog   |   India

Mission Journal: Challenges for India's press increase as Modi marks first year in office

Indian papers announce the election victory of Narendra Modi in May 2014. Journalists say reporting on government issues has become challenging in the past year. (AFP/Prakash Singh)

"Modi has tightened the screws on information." This statement from Bangalore-based journalist Subir Ghosh underscores a common challenge repeated to me by several of India's journalists, who say the space for criticism is shrinking under Narendra Modi's rule. Since a landslide victory made him leader of the world's largest democracy nearly one year ago, the prime minister has worked to distance his government from independent reporters, they said.

Blog   |   India, Internet

India's landmark online speech ruling is step toward greater press freedom

Aseem Trivedi speaks to the media after his arrest in 2012. Charges against the cartoonist have been dropped after India overturned part of its Information Technology Act. (Reuters/Danish Siddiqui)

In an historic decision, India's Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down part of a law used to silence criticism and free expression. While this marks a pivotal victory that has been welcomed in many quarters, many challenges remain for press freedom in the country.

Statements   |   India

CPJ welcomes Indian Supreme Court decision protecting online speech

Manila, March 24, 2015--The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the judgment by the Indian Supreme Court today that struck down as unconstitutional Section 66A of the country's Information Technology Act. Section 66A criminalized, among other types of speech, the transmission of "grossly offensive" information, as well as information for the purpose of causing "annoyance" or "inconvenience," according to reports. Individuals convicted under the provision faced up to three years in prison. The court held that Section 66A "arbitrarily, excessively and disproportionately invades the right of free speech" and that upholding it would lead to a "total" chilling effect on free expression.

Case   |   India

Bombs thrown at Indian TV station in Chennai

Assailants threw two homemade bombs at the offices of Puthiya Thalaimurai, an independent Tamil television station in Chennai, the capital city of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu, early on March 12, 2015, according to news reports. No one was injured, and the offices did not suffer any damage.

March 13, 2015 12:55 PM ET

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Blog   |   Burkina Faso, China, France, India

Ban of India's Daughter and other films silences debate on key issues

A poster advertises a screening of Timbuktu at the Pan-African Film Festival in Burkina Faso. The Oscar-nominated film on Islamic militancy was barred from a Paris suburb. (AFP/Ahmed Ouoba)

What do Delhi, Beijing, and Villiers-sur-Marne have in common, but Ouagadougou does not? The first three recently banned access to films their governments deemed inappropriate. But a film festival in the fourth, the capital of Burkina Faso in West Africa, is stepping up security to show an acclaimed but controversial movie about Islamic militancy in neighboring Mali.

Blog   |   India

In India, laws that back the offended force editor into hiding

A sand sculpture in Mumbai for victims of the Charlie Hebdo attack. An editor arrested after complaints over her decision to publish an image of the French magazine's cover has gone into hiding in India. (Reuters/Danish Siddiqui)

Mumbai may be 7,000 kilometers from Paris but the debate on freedom of expression sparked by coverage of the January 7 attack on French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is close to home for large parts of the Indian press.

February 9, 2015 3:45 PM ET

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Blog   |   China, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Kenya, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, South Africa, Turkey

After Charlie Hebdo attack, vigils, protests and publishing bans

Click on the image above to view a StoryMap of reaction to the Charlie Hebdo attack. (StoryMap/Samantha Libby)

Protests against the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo were held in Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Middle East and parts of Africa over the weekend, as crowds demonstrated against the magazine's portrayal of the Prophet Muhammad, according to news reports.

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