Ecuador

Ecuador bullies press into silence

Since Ecuador's restrictive Communications Law was implemented in 2013, it has acted as a straitjacket for the media. Newspapers are fined, editors self-censor, and President Rafael Correa sues and constantly ridicules journalists--including one prominent cartoonist--in his broadcasts. Partly due to government hostility, one magazine shut down last year, while one newspaper stopped publishing its print edition.

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Paper stops printing
Cartoonist adjusts to pressure
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Alerts   |   Ecuador

Ecuador court paves way for media regulation under constitution

Bogotá, November 5, 2014--The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by a decision by Ecuador's highest court that has paved the way for a constitutional amendment that would categorize the news media as a "public service" subject to government regulation.

November 5, 2014 3:17 PM ET

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Blog   |   Ecuador

Pressured by government, Ecuadoran cartoonist is forced to adjust

Called to testify before a government media oversight commission, editorial cartoonist Xavier Bonilla--known by his penname Bonil--showed up with a pair of four-foot-long mock pencils. But rather than having a small eraser on the tip, one of Bonil's giant pencils was nearly all eraser.

Blog   |   Ecuador

Ecuador newspaper shutters its presses, citing government pressure

Blaming government harassment and a related advertising slowdown, the daily newspaper Hoy ceased its Quito-based print edition Monday, and said it would transform into an online-only newspaper.

Blog   |   Ecuador

Ecuador's year-old media law stifles in-depth reporting

Rafael Correa is awarded an honorary doctorate by Santiago University in Chile on May 14, 2014. Four newspapers face fines for not covering the event sufficiently. (Reuters/Ivan Alvarado)

Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa generated little actual news during a two-day trip to Chile last month. So Ecuador's four main newspapers did the obvious: They published short wire service dispatches about his visit.

Attacks on the Press   |   Ecuador

Attacks on the Press in 2013: Ecuador

Bolstered by a landslide re-election, President Rafael Correa continued his offensive against Ecuador's critical press. His victory allowed him a significant win: the approval of a communications law that establishes regulation of editorial content and gives authorities the power to impose arbitrary sanctions and censor the press, according to CPJ research. At least one investigative newsmagazine shut down after the passage of the law, though economic concerns were also at issue. But while the president battered the press at home, he ran up against challenges abroad. In a serious blow to Correa, the Organization of American States voted to discard proposals introduced by Ecuador that would seriously weaken the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights  and its special rapporteur for freedom of expression. Although none of these proposals passed, a last-minute change to the resolution meant the debate would be allowed to continue. Local press freedom organizations documented dozens of anti-press violations throughout the year, including attacks, threats, harassment, obstruction, and arbitrary lawsuits.

February 12, 2014 1:50 AM ET

Attacks on the Press Press Releases   |   Bangladesh, Ecuador, Egypt, Liberia, Russia, Turkey, Vietnam, Zambia

Press freedom deteriorates in Cyberspace, Egypt, Russia

Risk List underlines mass surveillance, fatalities, and censorship

New York, February 6, 2014--Mass surveillance programs by the U.S. and U.K., as well as restrictive Internet legislation by various governments and a wave of cyberattacks globally, are among the disturbing developments that have landed cyberspace on the Committee to Protect Journalists' Risk List, released today.

February 6, 2014 4:48 PM ET

Alerts   |   Ecuador

Cartoonist sanctioned under Ecuador's communications law

Bogotá, February 3, 2014- The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns the decision by Ecuador's media oversight agency on Friday to use the country's communications law to sanction the leading local daily El Universo over a critical cartoon. The agency fined the daily and demanded that the cartoonist "correct" the cartoon within 72 hours, according to news reports.

Blog   |   Ecuador

Correa steps up fight; hacking alleged on both sides

Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, on a visit to Moscow in October 2013. (Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin)

Seven months after Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa flirted with the idea of offering asylum to former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, intercepted communications and leaked emails are again making headlines in the Andean country. This time, the story is not about international surveillance but a window onto the latest front in the ever-escalating war between the president and his critics.

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