Roberto Javier Mora García

7 results arranged by date

Case   |   Mexico

Mexican man sentenced to 16 years for journalist's murder

On June 3, 2009, Mexican Judge José Alberto Ciprés Sánchez sentenced Hiram Oliveros Ortiz to 16 years in prison for the 2004 murder of journalist Roberto Javier Mora García, editorial director of the Nuevo Laredo-based daily El Mañana, the paper reported. The following day, Oliveros' attorney appealed the decision to the Supreme Court of the State of Tamaulipas, according to local news reports.

July 23, 2009 4:25 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico

Attacks on the Press 2006: Mexico


MEXICO

Gunmen stormed the offices of the Nuevo Laredo daily El Mañana in February, firing assault rifles, tossing a grenade—and setting the tone for another dangerous year for Mexican journalists. The shocking assault, which seriously injured reporter Jaime Orozco, spurred the federal government to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate crimes against the press. The 2006 blotter was long: U.S. documentary filmmaker Bradley Will was murdered during civil unrest in the southern state of Oaxaca in October; Veracruz crime reporter Roberto Marcos García was slain in November; and Monclova journalist Rafael Ortiz Martínez went missing in July after exposing widespread problems related to prostitution. CPJ is investigating five other journalist murders to determine whether they were work-related.

Reports

Mexico: Dread on the Border

By Carlos Lauria and Sauro Gonzalez Rodriguez 

February 24, 2006 7:01 PM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico, Venezuela

Attacks on the Press 2005: Americas Analysis

All the News That Can't Be Printed
By Carlos Lauría

Good investigative reporters know more than they can write. The problem in some Latin American countries is that good reporters are barely writing anything. From Brazil to the U.S.-Mexico border, journalists are looking over their shoulders before sitting down at their computers or going on the air. Most reporters in the region's big cities can still take on corruption and criticize the authorities without fearing for their lives. But in isolated rural areas where the power of the central government is either weak or nonexistent, journalists are at the mercy of anyone with a gun.

February 16, 2006 11:56 AM ET

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Attacks on the Press   |   Mexico

Attacks on the Press 2005: Mexico

MEXICO

Journalists working along the U.S.-Mexico border were under siege
from organized criminals targeting them for coverage of drug trafficking. One reporter was killed for her work and another went missing, making northern Mexico one of the most dangerous spots for journalists in Latin America. Facing intimidation and attack, journalists in the northern states reported greater self-censorship.

Alerts   |   Mexico

Reporter seriously wounded; border city plagued by violenceGunmen storm Mexican newspaper

New York, February 7, 2006—The Committee to Protect Journalists condemns Monday's vicious attack against the offices of the newspaper El Mañana in Nuevo Laredo, a city on the U.S.-Mexican border that is plagued by drug-related violence. Unidentified assailants fired assault rifles and tossed a grenade at the newspaper's offices, causing considerable damage and seriously wounding one reporter. The paper's editor was murdered just two years ago.
February 7, 2006 12:00 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Mexico

CPJ asks for information about journalist's murder

New York, March 25, 2004—The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) sent a letter today to Tomás Yarrington Ruvalcaba, governor of the State of Tamaulipas in northern Mexico, inquiring about the investigation into the murder of Roberto Javier Mora García, editorial director for the Nuevo Laredo­based daily El Mañana. Mora, 42, was stabbed to death on Friday, March 19.

Local authorities discovered Mora's body next to his vehicle, which was parked in front of his house, just before dawn last Friday. According to local press reports, Mora had arrived home from work at around 2 a.m. on March 19. He was stabbed more than 25 times. Police said that none of Mora's belongings were taken.
March 25, 2004 12:00 PM ET

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7 results