Omar Rodríguez Saludes

22 results arranged by date

Blog   |   Cuba, Journalist Assistance, Spain

Expelled from Cuba jails, journalists languish in Spain

Ricardo González Alfonso (left) and Julio César Gálvez Rodríguez at a press conference in Vallecas in July 2010. (AFP/Dominique Faget)

In 2010, following midsummer negotiations between the Catholic Church and the government of President Raúl Castro, Cuban authorities began releasing imprisoned journalists, sending them into forced exile with their families. In April 2011, the last of more than 20 journalists arrived in Spain. They had been granted liberty and respite, and were promised support from Spanish authorities while they settled into the new country. But almost two years after the first crop of journalists arrived in Spain, the four who remain in the country are living under extremely difficult conditions, struggling even to feed themselves.

Blog   |   Cuba

Unexpected departure: From jail to exile

Saludes in Spain. It was about 4 in the afternoon on July 8 when the official assigned to me at Toledo Prison, where I'd been locked up for nearly five years, came running to get me. He was in such a hurry that that he tripped and almost fell to the ground. "Saludes, we're going upstairs," he said, breathless and sweating. He didn't give me any more details, but I soon found out that he was taking me up to the director's office where State Security was waiting for me. "They've come to talk to me," I told myself. And they had.

At the chief's desk sat an agent of the political police. I didn't recognize his face, but he had the same harshness and arrogance as all members of that repressive body. As soon as I entered the office, the agent signaled me silently to pick up the telephone receiver lying unhooked on the desk.   

December 28, 2010 10:00 AM ET

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Alerts   |   Cuba

Two more Cuban journalists freed, arrive in Spain

Freed journalists Normando Hernández González, right, and Omar Rodríguez Saludes hug on arrival in Madrid. (AP/Arturo Rodriguez)

New York, July 14, 2010—Two more Cuban journalists were freed from prison and flown to Madrid today, a day after the arrival there of six colleagues, as part of an extensive release of imprisoned dissidents by the Cuban government.

December 8, 2009 12:00 PM ET

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December 4, 2008 9:28 AM ET

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Dangerous Assignments   |   Cuba

Cuba's Long Black Spring

Five years after the Castro government cracked down on the independent press, more than 20 journalists remain behind bars for the crime of free expression.

Imprisoned

2006 prison census: 134 journalists jailed

ALGERIA: 2

Djamel Eddine Fahassi,
Alger Chaîne III
IMPRISONED: May 6, 1995

Fahassi, a reporter for the state-run radio station Alger Chaîne III and a contributor to several Algerian newspapers, including the now-banned weekly of the Islamic Salvation Front, Al-Forqane, was abducted near his home in the al-Harrache suburb of the capital, Algiers, by four well-dressed men carrying walkie-talkies. According to eyewitnesses who later spoke with his wife, the men called out Fahassi's name and then pushed him into a waiting car. He has not been seen since, and Algerian authorities have denied any knowledge of his arrest.

Attacks on the Press   |   Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Colombia, Cuba, Eritrea, Ethiopia, France, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Iran, Iraq, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, USA, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam

Attacks on the Press 2006: Countries That Have Jailed Journalists

ALGERIA: 2

Djamel Eddine Fahassi,
Alger Chaîne III
IMPRISONED: May 6, 1995

Fahassi, a reporter for the state-run radio station Alger Chaîne III and a contributor to several Algerian newspapers, including the now-banned weekly of the Islamic Salvation Front, Al-Forqane, was abducted near his home in the al-Harrache suburb of the capital, Algiers, by four well-dressed men carrying walkie-talkies. According to eyewitnesses who later spoke with his wife, the men called out Fahassi's name and then pushed him into a waiting car. He has not been seen since, and Algerian authorities have denied any knowledge of his arrest.

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