Allah Noor

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Reports   |   Pakistan

Roots of Impunity

Appendix

Journalists Killed 2003-2012: Motive Confirmed

CPJ research has determined that 42 journalists were killed in Pakistan in direct relation to their work from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. An additional 12 journalists were killed in unclear circumstances during the time period. Capsule reports on each death follow, beginning with cases in which CPJ has confirmed a work-related motive.


Alerts   |   Pakistan

News OutletPakistani officials pledge review of journalist killingsDateNameNews outlet




CPJ Pakistan Cases: 2002-2006

I. JOURNALISTS KILLED: 8
Date
Name
News outlet

February 21, 2002Daniel Pearl The Wall Street Journal

Attacks on the Press   |   Pakistan

Attacks on the Press 2005: Pakistan

PAKISTAN

Striking contradictions emerged during the sixth year of Gen. Pervez Musharraf's rule. Baton-wielding police attacked journalists in several high-profile incidents, including two on World Press Freedom Day in May, even as the administration publicly proclaimed its commitment to press freedom. Journalists faced new threats of imprisonment for defamation and programming deemed "vulgar," while the broadcast sector blossomed with the launch of numerous commercial television and radio stations.
February 16, 2006 11:14 AM ET

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Alerts   |   Qatar

WHO KILLS JOURNALISTS AND WHY? Report by the Committee to Protect Journalists to the Committee of Inquiry


Doha, Qatar, Monday, May 23, 2005
—The Committee to Protect Journalists has analyzed the deaths of journalists across the world for many years, producing two recent reports that highlight alarming trends in the circumstances, locations, and motives.

At least 339 journalists were killed on duty between 1995 and 2004, according to CPJ research compiled in January. But the vast majority did not die on any battlefield, or while covering a dangerous assignment. They were murdered in cold blood, in reprisal for their work or to prevent them from doing their jobs.

Alerts   |   Pakistan

Pakistani journalist acquitted of treason charges

New York, April 25, 2005—The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomes the decision of an antiterrorism court in the southwestern city of Quetta to acquit Khawar Mehdi Rizvi and his two associates, Allah Noor and Abdullah Shakir, of treason. Judge Shaukat Ali Rakhshani acquitted the three on Saturday because of lack of evidence by the prosecution, the state-run Pakistan Newswire reported.

April 25, 2005 12:00 PM ET

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Case   |   Pakistan

PAKISTAN

FEBRUARY 7, 2005
Posted: March 14, 2005

Amir Nowab, or Mir Nawab, Associated Press Television News, Frontier Post
Allah Noor, Khyber TV

KILLED-CONFIRMED
Anwar Shakir, Agence France-Presse
Zardad Khan, Al-Jazeera

February 7, 2005 12:00 PM ET

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Alerts   |   Pakistan

Two journalists killed, two others wounded in gun attack

New York, February 7, 2005—Gunmen in Pakistan's tribal area of South Waziristan fatally shot two journalists today and wounded two others. Amir Nowab, also known as Mir Nawab, a freelance cameraman for Associated Press Television News and a reporter for the Frontier Post newspaper, and Allah Noor, who was working for Peshawar-based Khyber TV, became the first journalists in 2005 to be killed in the line of duty.
February 7, 2005 12:00 PM ET

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  |   Pakistan

Allah Noor

Gunmen in South Waziristan fatally shot Allah Noor, a journalist for Peshawar-based Khyber TV, and Amir Nowab, a freelance cameraman for Associated Press Television News and a reporter for the Frontier Post newspaper. The journalists were riding with colleagues in a bus transporting them from the town of Sararogha, where they had covered the surrender of a suspected tribal militant, Baitullah Mehsud.

A car overtook the bus about 7:30 p.m. near the town of Wana, and assailants opened fire with AK-47 assault rifles, according to The Associated Press, which quoted Mahmood Shah, chief of security for Pakistan's tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. Two other journalists riding in the bus were injured. Anwar Shakir, a stringer for Agence France-Presse, was wounded in the back during the attack, according to news reports. Dilawar Khan, who was working for Al-Jazeera, suffered minor injuries. Nowab was also known professionally as Mir Nawab.

Days later, a group calling itself Sipah-e-Islam, or Soldiers of Islam, claimed responsibility for the killings in a letter faxed to newspapers. It accused some journalists of "working for Christians" and of "being used as tools in negative propaganda ... against the Muslim mujahideen."

Local journalists blamed officials for not doing more at the time of the murders. They said no attempt was made to stop the gunmen's vehicle even though the attack took place in an area under government control. They also said no real investigation into the murders took place.

The Pakistani military had begun an offensive against suspected Al-Qaeda fighters in South Waziristan in early 2004. 


February 7, 2005 12:05 AM ET

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  |   Pakistan

Amir Nowab

AP

Gunmen in South Waziristan fatally shot Allah Noor, a journalist for Peshawar-based Khyber TV, and Amir Nowab, a freelance cameraman for Associated Press Television News and a reporter for the Frontier Post newspaper. The journalists were riding with colleagues in a bus transporting them from the town of Sararogha, where they had covered the surrender of a suspected tribal militant, Baitullah Mehsud.

A car overtook the bus about 7:30 p.m. near the town of Wana, and assailants opened fire with AK-47 assault rifles, according to The Associated Press, which quoted Mahmood Shah, chief of security for Pakistan's tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. Two other journalists riding in the bus were injured. Anwar Shakir, a stringer for Agence France-Presse, was wounded in the back during the attack, according to news reports. Dilawar Khan, who was working for Al-Jazeera, suffered minor injuries. Nowab was also known professionally as Mir Nawab.

Days later, a group calling itself Sipah-e-Islam, or Soldiers of Islam, claimed responsibility for the killings in a letter faxed to newspapers. It accused some journalists of "working for Christians" and of "being used as tools in negative propaganda ... against the Muslim mujahideen."

Local journalists blamed officials for not doing more at the time of the murders. They said no attempt was made to stop the gunmen's vehicle even though the attack took place in an area under government control. They also said no real investigation into the murders took place.

The Pakistani military had begun an offensive against suspected Al-Qaeda fighters in South Waziristan in early 2004. 

February 7, 2005 12:00 AM ET

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